Posts Tagged weapons

Army program secures critical component for artillery, mortar ammunition

Soldiers assigned to Bulldog Battery, Field Artillery Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment load a M777A2 Howitzer during 2CR's Maneuver Rehearsal Exercise at Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany, Feb. 13, 2013. The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition.

Soldiers assigned to Bulldog Battery, Field Artillery Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment load a M777A2 Howitzer during 2CR’s Maneuver Rehearsal Exercise at Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany, Feb. 13, 2013. The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition, officials said.

Because of changes in the global cotton industry, the United States no longer has a domestic source of quality raw material for manufacturing nitrocellulose for combustible cartridge cases that are used extensively by the military. A domestic source is necessary to ensure a sufficient supply of quality cartridge cases, which is vital to maintaining readiness of the armed forces, according to Army experts.

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http://go.usa.gov/ZtYJ

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Secretary of the Army visits Picatinny, assesses sequestration impact on R&D

Secretary of the Army John McHugh looks at a technology display during a visit to Picatinny Arsenal, N.J. McHugh visited the New Jersey military installation, which has been designated the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition, Sept. 26, 2013, to assess the effect of sequestration on the installation's efforts in research, development, acquisition and lifecycle management of weapon systems and ammunition. (U.S. Army photo by Erin Usawicz)

Secretary of the Army John McHugh looks at a technology display during a visit to Picatinny Arsenal, N.J. McHugh visited the New Jersey military installation, which has been designated the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition, Sept. 26, 2013, to assess the effect of sequestration on the installation’s efforts in research, development, acquisition and lifecycle management of weapon systems and ammunition. (U.S. Army photo by Erin Usawicz)

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (Sept. 26, 2013) — Secretary of the Army John McHugh was at the Picatinny Arsenal Thursday, to assess the effect of sequestration on the installation’s efforts in research, development, acquisition and lifecycle management of weapon systems and ammunition.

“This is a unique facility with a critically important mission; there really is no other government or industry counterpart to Picatinny,” McHugh said, underscoring the arsenal’s contribution to national security. “The workforce possesses knowledge and expertise that increases the lethality of the joint services warfighter.”

Picatinny Arsenal was designated the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition, providing products and services to all branches of the U.S. military.

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New guided munition sensors are greater than sum of their parts

A sensor array next to a quarter to reflect relative size.

A sensor array next to a quarter to reflect relative size.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (September 18, 2013) — When preparing to face a more talented opponent, coaches tell their players that the path to victory is pulling together as a team to somehow obtain more than a sum of each player’s talents.

For Army scientists, that same concept may have been expressed in the form of an advanced algorithm that gets optimum performance from a team of inertial sensors, which could be used to guide cannon-fired munitions to a target with near precision, even without Global Positioning Satellite navigation.

In addition to high performance, a big advantage to the team of sensors is greatly reduced cost.

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Picatinny to remove tons of toxins from lethal rounds

Belts of .50 caliber ammunition await U.S. Soldiers with the 6th Engineer Battalion, 2nd Engineer Brigade, as they prepare to conduct qualifications on the M2 .50 caliber machine gun at a range in Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Aug. 14, 2012. The Pyrotechnics Division of the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center, at Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., is developing an alternate formula for certain armor-piercing incendiary projectiles that is friendlier to the environment than the chemicals currently being used.

Belts of .50 caliber ammunition await U.S. Soldiers with the 6th Engineer Battalion, 2nd Engineer Brigade, as they prepare to conduct qualifications on the M2 .50 caliber machine gun at a range in Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Aug. 14, 2012. Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (August 22, 2013) — An enemy convoy transporting a supply of fuel rumbles across the desert floor, an ideal target for armor-piercing incendiary projectiles.

These projectiles are most useful for “after-armor effects,” such as an incandescent flash immediately after penetrating a hard target. The resulting plume may be useful for devastating any fuel-storage facilities by igniting the fuel vapors.

The Army uses a formulation called IM-28 that is charged into certain armor-piercing incendiary projectiles, which can be fired from such weapons as the M2, M3, and M85 machine guns.

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Picatinny to grant doctoral degrees

Soon we'll have people who have earned their PhD from Picatinny Arsenal.

Soon we’ll have people who have earned their PhD from Picatinny Arsenal.


PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Sure we’re already the Joint Center of Excellence for Armaments and Munitions. Now we’ll also be known as a degree granting institution. Who will be the first to earn their PhD from Picatinny Arsenal?

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Army leads nation in push to digital manufacturing

 ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The Obama administration has chosen the U.S. Army to launch an institute with a goal to spur innovation in digital manufacturing, officials announced recently.

The Army is enlisting its Manufacturing Technology Program, commonly known as ManTech, to lead the establishment of the Digital Manufacturing and Design Innovation Institute, said Andy Davis, ManTech program manager within the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command.

“This is an RDECOM-led effort. This is an opportunity for the command to drive this area forward,” Davis said.

RDECOM manages ManTech on behalf of the deputy assistant secretary of the Army for Research and Technology, which has overall responsibility for the Army’s program.

Dr. Greg Harris, with RDECOM’s Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center at Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the DMDI Institute program manager for Army. He is leading the effort, with participation from the Air Force, Navy and nine other federal government agencies.

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http://go.usa.gov/jqJF

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Army scientist discusses developing Soldier solutions ‘at the speed of war’

Mike Anthony (center), who recently completed a six-month deployment in which he served as director of the RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, talks with RFAST-C engineer Nick Merrill (left) and RFAST-C engineering technician Courtney Johnson, about the design of a modified "batwing" command wire detection hook for use with robots at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, April 25, 2013.

Mike Anthony (center), who recently completed a six-month deployment in which he served as director of the RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, talks with RFAST-C engineer Nick Merrill (left) and RFAST-C engineering technician Courtney Johnson, about the design of a modified “batwing” command wire detection hook for use with robots at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, April 25, 2013.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (June 12, 2013) — U.S. Army civilian engineers and engineering technicians have deployed to Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, for the past two years to develop field-expedient solutions for Soldiers.

They comprise the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, or RFAST-C, a forward-deployed prototype integration facility and Energy Initiative Proving Ground.

Mike Anthony recently completed a six-month deployment in which he served as RFAST-C director. He returns to his job as the chief of the Mission Command Capabilities Division at RDECOM’s Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center.

In an interview with the RDECOM public affairs office, Anthony discussed how RFAST-C brings expertise of the command’s scientists and engineers directly to theater to empower, unburden and protect Soldiers.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/b9Zh

 

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Digital howitzer fielded by 82nd Airborne Division

Digital howitzer still requires some manual work to achieve maximum utility.

Digital howitzer still requires some manual work to achieve maximum utility.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — The digital M119A3 105 mm howitzer was fielded by Soldiers of the 82nd Airborne Division. It was a PEO Ammunition project, but ARDEC helped out too.

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Army team spans globe for science, technology solutions

RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, or RFAST-C, engineers and technicians discuss prototype integration facility capabilities with senior noncommissioned officers from the 18th Engineer Brigade at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, in June 2012.

RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, or RFAST-C, engineers and technicians discuss prototype integration facility capabilities with senior noncommissioned officers from the 18th Engineer Brigade at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, in June 2012.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — U.S. Army science advisors are embedded with major units around the world to speed technology solutions to Soldiers’ needs.

The Field Assistance in Science and Technology program’s 30 science advisors, both uniformed officers and Army civilians, provide a link between Soldiers and the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s thousands of subject matter experts.

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http://go.usa.gov/T9Gd

 

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Fire-resistant ghillie suit, enhanced rocket fuze win DoD awards

 

A 1st Battalion, 175th Infantry Soldier practices camouflage, cover and concealment with the fire-resistant ghillie suit during training at Fort A.P. Hill, Va., in November 2012. The fire-resistant ghillie suit was acquired for U.S. Army and Marine Corps snipers in record time through the Defense Acquisition Challenge Program.

A 1st Battalion, 175th Infantry Soldier practices camouflage, cover and concealment with the fire-resistant ghillie suit during training at Fort A.P. Hill, Va., in November 2012. The fire-resistant ghillie suit was acquired for U.S. Army and Marine Corps snipers in record time through the Defense Acquisition Challenge Program.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — U.S. Army program managers earned Department of Defense acquisition awards recently for rapidly fielding a fire-resistant ghillie suit and an enhanced fuze rocket warhead.

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http://go.usa.gov/2wtB

 

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Saving time, effort and $$$ with 3-D plans and schematics

When the Ds are 3, things are better all around for manufactures working with our plans and schematics.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — See how the Armament Research Development and Engineering Center teamed up with the Army Research Lab to get our plans and schematics up to speed with the rest of industry saving time, effort, and $$$. Because saving $$$ is kind of a big deal.

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Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, RELOAD!

Reload!

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Because once is never enough, we came up with a solution on what to do with old artillery shells. Click the link to find out where they all went.

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.50 Cal.: Making the best even better

Our mission: to make one of the best weapons ever fielded even better. Challenge accepted (and met).

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — We wanted to know if we could make one of the best weapons ever fielded even better. We did. The result? The latest upgrade to the legendary M2 .50 Calibur Machine Gun.

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Army research centers partner for improved ammunition packaging

 

 U.S. Army research and development centers are collaborating to design new ammunition packaging that could yield significant cost savings and improve battlefield capability, officials said.

Two organizations within the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command — the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center and Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center — are developing a packaging system for 5.56-millimeter ammunition as an alternative to fabric bandoleers.

The new system is being developed for the Project Director Joint Services in support of the Program Manager for Maneuver Ammunition Systems. It could save considerable cost by using lightweight and inexpensive plastic packaging materials with a design that will allow for automated packing at the ammunition manufacturing plant, said Dan Klein, an engineer with ARDEC’s Packaging Division who serves as the program lead.

 To read more:

http://go.usa.gov/g3BC

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Army announces greatest inventions of 2011

Spc. Nicholas Ketchen and Spc. Colt Corbin, mortarmen from Company C, 1st Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, achieved a first in the U.S. Army history by firing a 120mm Mortar Precision Guided Munition for the first time in Afghanistan, and hitting within four meters of the target, on Forward Operation Base Kushamond, Afghanistan, March 26, 2011.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. – U.S. Army officials announced the winners of its greatest inventions competition Sept. 19.

A team of combat veteran non-commissioned officers, as well as U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command field-grade officers, reviewed and voted for the Army Greatest Inventions of 2011.

Dale Ormond, director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, commended the scientists and engineers for their efforts to empower, unburden and protect Soldiers.

“The contributions made by these teams promise to improve the well-being of Soldiers and the Army’s capability to contribute to quality of life and our national security,” Ormond said. “All of the nominated inventions demonstrate significant contributions to the warfighter.

 Read more on Army.mil 

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Solution to weapons development problem: HALO and Mass Effect

Who says spending time playing video games never solved anything?

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Think all that time you spent playing video games didn’t contribute to something much more significant than unlocking acheivements, earning virtual trophies or memorizing the Konami Code? Think again. A software engineer with the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center has stumbled across a potential solution to a weapons development problem thanks to his case of sore thumbs. Thanks, Master Chief.

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SCat Gun tests at Picatinny Arsenal

This is a photo of our SCat Gun here at Picatinny Arsenal. We just can't get enough of our SCat Gun. (SCat Gun)

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Testing new and unique projectiles is an important task that requires some unique equipment. To those ends, the SCat Gun here takes care of business. We think even McKayla Maroney would be impressed. Maybe.

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Precision strikes from Strykers

A Soldier prepares to drop the first Accelerated Precision Mortar Initiative round fired from a Stryker Double-V Hull Mortar Carrier Vehicle in Afghanistan. What happened? A direct hit. The Death Star is no match for this weapon system.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — It’s a mortar system so accurate it can score a direct hit with the first round (which is harder to do than some may think) and now it comes mounted a Stryker. It’s accurate like Rick Barry from the free throw line and that’s cool.

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It’s like that Avatar movie

Motion-capture suits were worn to create avatars for the M777A2 trainer. No blue cat-people were rendered.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Like something out of a Hollywood sci-fi production, Soldiers and Marines donned motion-capture suits and underwent face scans to render computer avatars of themselves. But this was no movie set and there would be no red carpet premiere.

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Lightning storm! Our article has gone viral

This image could only be more popular if we photoshopped a Pikachu in there.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Our article on the laser-induced plasma channel technology has gone viral! We’ve been featured in quite a few media outlets from across the country as well as on international websites.

A slew of technology and science news sites have run the image and have adapted the release for their own.

A few media outlets in the United Kingdom have run it as well.

Here’s one from the Philippines, Russia, and Turkey.

And if I understood Portuguese, Hungarian, German, Lithuanian, and especially the Polish language, I could tell you what they said about the technology.

Oh, and it also appeared here, here, and here.

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