Posts Tagged VIP

Exclusive Interview with the Honorable Heidi Shyu

photoAssistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology Heidi Shyu serves as the Army acquisition executive, the senior procurement executive, science advisor to the Secretary of the Army, and the Army’s senior research and development official. She also has principal responsibility for all Department of the Army matters related to logistics. She appoints and manages program executive officers and manages the Army Acquisition Corps and Army Acquisition Workforce.

What is your vision for ASA(ALT) collaboration with industry, academia and other organizations?

I think collaboration is really essential. No single person or organization possesses a monopoly on innovative ideas. It is critical for us to collaborate with industry, academia, federally funded R&D centers and other government organizations to solve difficult problems. So my vision is that we will collaborate across the board to spur innovation.

In the S&T arena, we work closely with academia. We also have the Broad Agency Announcement, small business forums, cross–service collaboration on Research, Development, Test and Evaluation. We collaborate with DARPA and university affiliated research centers. We have individual investigator grants and collaborations with partner nations. Defense companies are willing to invest their R&D dollars to help solve the Army’s challenges, so we need to dialogue with them to inform them of our challenges and stay abreast of their ideas, design and development activities. The goal is to get a multitude of ideas to figure out how to solve problems. Collaboration is critical.

How do you see technology providing Soldiers with the decisive edge?

There are many technologies that can provide Soldiers with the decisive edge. One of our key goals is to develop lighter and stronger armor. Why? Because it will enhance survivability and improve mobility. We’re also developing initiatives like continuous soldier health sensing and monitoring, disruptive energetic materials that could provide increased lethality, bio-inspired sensing to eliminate tactical surprise, and energy harvesting to reduce our dependence on fuel.

How do budget concerns affect your vision?

The Army has by and large protected its S&T budget. The rest of the budget has faced double-digit reductions. The American Soldier is the best equipped in the world – thanks to our materiel enterprise. We must continue to invest in S&T in order to equip our Soldier of the future.

We have focused on a 30-year plan, called the long-range investment requirements analysis, or LIRA, which is enabling us to link S&T efforts to programs of record. This will allow us to focus our research activities to address capability shortfalls.

How does ASA(ALT) partner with U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, its centers and laboratories?

The partnership we have with RDECOM is critical. RDECOM plays a very important role across all of the PEOs and the acquisition community by providing critical functions and skill sets such as research, development, systems engineering, design, performance analysis, modeling and simulation, software, reliability analysis, prototyping, integration and test, and more. For example:

  • CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate S&T provided our Soldiers the ability to dominate the night
  • NSRDEC has provided transportable high energy efficient shower units, kitchen units and shelters
  • AMRDEC has provided critical missile expertise to PEO Missile & Space
  • TARDEC has provided high-fidelity modeling and simulation capabilities that accurately predict blast effects on our vehicles and enable us to design more survivable vehicles to reduce injuries to our Soldiers
  • All of CERDEC has provided technical assessment of the effectiveness of our tactical radios

What are your expectations from Army researchers, scientists and engineers?

It’s important for our Army researchers, scientists and engineers to stay fully abreast of the latest technologies and where the research is going. They really have to be masters of their domain to solve the Army’s difficult problems. We rely on them to give us the next generation of capabilities.

I’d like to see tighter linkages between the S&T community with the PMs, PEOs and the requirements community to ensure relevance, especially in this fiscally challenged environment. Ultimately we must understand the art of the possible and how to structure that for the future. As we look at the S&T capabilities we need to develop, I think it is critical for our researchers to tie into our 30-year road-map.

One of the key things I think the Army needs to do is ensure we provide our people with a research environment where they can innovate. We have world-class scientists and engineers in their field, and they are highly motivated to solve the most difficult problems for our Soldiers. I’ve had the pleasure of meeting many of our outstanding researchers, scientists and engineers, and I really admire their dedication, passion for their work and innovation. I’m very impressed with our caliber of researchers, and they are the critical enablers for us to develop the next generation of capabilities for our Soldiers.

Daniel R. McGauley (left), RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center executive officer, describes a Common Remotely Operated Weapons Station thermal imager protective cover designed and fabricated by his team at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Jan. 15, 2013 during a visit from Maj. Gen. Harold Greene, deputy for acquisition and systems management at ASA (ALT); Heidi Shyu, assistant secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology; and Gen. Dennis L. Via, commanding general, Army Materiel Command. (U.S. Army photo)

Daniel R. McGauley (left), RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center executive officer, describes a Common Remotely Operated Weapons Station thermal imager protective cover designed and fabricated by his team at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Jan. 15, 2013 during a visit from Maj. Gen. Harold Greene, deputy for acquisition and systems management at ASA (ALT); Heidi Shyu, assistant secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology; and Gen. Dennis L. Via, commanding general, Army Materiel Command. (U.S. Army photo)

Biography

, , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Polish scientists, U.S. Army researchers discuss partnerships

Lester Hitch (left), an engineering technician for the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center's Rapid Technologies Branch, explains additive manufacturing to a group of Polish scientists at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Oct. 2. (U.S. Army photo by Crystal Maynard)

Lester Hitch (left), an engineering technician for the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center’s Rapid Technologies Branch, explains additive manufacturing to a group of Polish scientists at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Oct. 2. (U.S. Army photo by Crystal Maynard)

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Oct. 10, 2013) — A group of Polish scientists traveled to U.S. Army research centers Oct. 2-3 to learn about America’s expertise in robotics and explore potential partnerships.

The delegation, led by retired Col. Jozef Wrona, of 15 scientists from Polish academia and industry will advise their government on advancing the country’s robotics program.

Dale A. Ormond, director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, discussed his organization’s global footprint and emphasized reaching into the international scientific community for technological solutions.

Read more …

, , ,

No Comments

Former “Cheers” actor visits Picatinny to learn military manufacturing techniques

During a tour of Picatinny Sept. 4, James Zunino (right), Picatinny Materials Engineer, shows actor John Ratzenberger a modular tool that can be added onto the Multi-Axis Modular Manufacturing Platform for additive manufacturing. Different tools allow the machine to perform different manufacturing techniques. Photo Credit: Erin Usawicz

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Actor John Ratzenberger, best known for his iconic role as postal worker Cliff Clavin on the TV show “Cheers,” is promoting manufacturing in the U.S.

His interest led him to visit Picatinny Arsenal Sept. 4, where he saw first-hand a number of the advanced manufacturing techniques the installation uses to equip the nation’s warfighters.

Ratzenberger’s interest in manufacturing previously inspired him to produce and host shows like “Made in America,” a Travel Channel TV production highlighting manufacturing companies that produce interesting products across the nation.

Click here to read more.

, , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Army engineering team marks a year of solutions in theater

 

Daniel R. McGauley (left), executive officer of the RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, describes a Common Remotely Operated Weapons Station thermal imager protective cover that was designed and fabricated by the RFAST-C at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Jan. 15. McGauley briefs (from left) Maj. Gen. Harold Greene, deputy for acquisition and systems management at ASA (ALT); Heidi Shyu, assistant secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology; and Gen. Dennis L. Via, commanding general of the U.S. Army Materiel Command.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — A team of U.S. civilian engineers and technicians deployed to Afghanistan recently marked one year of solving Soldiers’ technological hurdles.

The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, or RFAST-C, Forward Deployed Prototype Integration Facility provides a platform for its subject matter experts’ knowledge and talents to be translated into battlefield solutions, said Michael Anthony, the team’s director.

To read more:

 http://go.usa.gov/4krY

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Taiwanese military officials visit U.S. Army research facility

Taiwanese Lt. Gen. Shou-Fong Chin (left) receives a briefing about the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command from Director Dale Ormond at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., June 18.

Taiwanese Lt. Gen. Shou-Fong Chin (left) receives a briefing about the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command from Director Dale Ormond at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., June 18. (U.S. Army photo by David McNally)

A Taiwanese military delegation met with U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command Director Dale Ormond at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., June 18. The group is on a tour of military sites around the nation.

, , , ,

No Comments

Army undersecretary talks business

Undersecretary of the Army Joseph W. Westphal (center) tours a facility at Picatinny Arsenal accompanied by Brig. Gen. Jonathan A. Maddox (right), Program Executive Officer for Ammunition and Picatinny Arsenal senior commander. (Photo by Todd Mozes)

Picatinny Arsenal, N.J. – While the public may associate the U.S. Army with Soldiers and weapons on the battlefield, there is also an “institutional” Army that has functions similar to those of large corporations in the private sector, a top Army official told a business group here April 2.

Speaking before the Morristown Chamber of Commerce, Undersecretary of the Army Joseph W. Westphal said the institutional or “business side” of the Army was responsible for the training, recruiting, staffing, equipping and sustaining of the Army forces.

Click here to read more.

, , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

New command sergeant major assumes role at RDECOM

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command introduced its new senior noncommissioned officer to the community March 16.
Command Sgt. Maj. Lebert O. Beharie assumed duties as the leader of RDECOM’s enlisted Soldiers during a Change of Responsibility ceremony at the Post Theater. About 150 Soldiers and Army civilian employees welcomed Beharie to RDECOM and APG.

MARIN BIDS FAREWELL

Beharie takes over from Command Sgt. Maj. Hector Marin. The Army promoted Marin to the rank of command sergeant major in 1999, and he has served as RDECOM’s senior NCO since Aug. 5, 2007.

A native of Honduras who moved to New York City at age 10, Marin enlisted in September 1981. He described his journey from a child through his three decades as a Soldier stationed across the globe.

“My journey began a long time ago when I first got to this great country. I felt a sense of duty immediately,” Marin said. “I wanted to give back to this nation for what was given to me — an opportunity to get an education, an opportunity to live free in a democratic country, a place where opportunities to excel are endless, an opportunity to serve and sacrifice for the good of all citizens of this nation. I joined the Army as part of this sense of duty. I wanted to ensure those who came before me who may have lost their lives did not do so in vain.

“As a young boy living in Honduras, I used to chase helicopters down the street. I was very fascinated by that piece of machinery. I always wondered, ‘How can something like that hang up in the sky and fly?’ So when I entered the United States and began my studies in New York, I had my eyes on becoming an aviator. Through hard work, perseverance and encouragement from family, I managed to meet the qualifications to enter the Army as an aviator. Here I am today.”

Marin thanked his fellow NCOs for their efforts to interact with RDECOM’s scientists and engineers to ensure the success of the command’s mission to empower, unburden and protect Soldiers.

“Since my arrival here, I quickly got engaged with our noncommissioned officers to ensure we understood our role in providing our engineers and scientists with relevant feedback to assist with the development of new technology and delivering it to the hands of Warfighters,” Marin said. “Our noncommissioned officers have a vital role in making sure that RDECOM is technology driven and always Warfighter focused.”

BEHARIE TAKES OVER AS SENIOR NCO

Beharie will lead the command’s 80 enlisted Soldiers at its APG headquarters and seven research centers with offices around the world. The command sergeant major serves as the principal adviser to the director in enlisted matters. He is responsible for the training, professional development, retention, readiness and discipline of Soldiers under his charge.

Beharie said he has been impressed by the passion of RDECOM scientists and engineers to support those in uniform.

“I have had some great opportunities to serve over my military career. However, serving as RDECOM sergeant major is a dream job,” Beharie said. “This organization and its professional workforce touch the lives of all the men and women in the Armed Forces, as well as our nation.

“Over the last few weeks, I have had the opportunity to visit some of our labs and meet some of our men and women who work tirelessly to give our troops the fighting edge on the battlefield. I was blown away by the technology that they have developed and are currently working on.”

Beharie will report to RDECOM Director Dale Ormond, who replaced Maj. Gen. Nick Justice as the organization’s senior leader Feb. 10. Ormond thanked Marin for his dedication to the Army, RDECOM and Soldiers.

“What a terrific story of Command Sergeant Major Marin. [He is] a terrific Soldier and a leader of Soldiers,” Ormond said. “He wanted to give back for the opportunities that America gave him. He has connected our scientists and engineers to the Soldiers, communicating with Soldiers and talking to them about what their real issues, challenges and needs are. [He made] sure that was funneled back into us so that we have that connection to what is going on in theater.

“[He made] tremendous personal efforts to stand up the RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. He helped put in place how we as RDECOM solve materiel [problems] at the point of need.”

In one of his first official duties, Beharie will oversee RDECOM’s annual Noncomissioned Officer/Soldier of the Year Competition at APG March 26 to 31. Five enlisted Soldiers will compete in a physical fitness test, weapons range, land navigation, obstacle course, 12-mile ruck march, essay and written exam, media interviews, and board appearance.

Beharie has served as the 101st Combat Aviation Brigade’s command sergeant major at Fort Campbell, Ky., since April 2009. He enlisted in 1986 and has four combat tours in the Persian Gulf.

Beharie and his wife, Sabrina, have three children.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Civilian takes charge of RDECOM

 

Dale A. Ormond (left) assumes responsibility for the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command in a ceremony hosted by Army Materiel Command Commanding General Gen. Ann E. Dunwoody at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Feb. 10. Maj. Gen. Nick Justice (right) had served as RDECOM commander since Dec. 4, 2009.

Dale A. Ormond (left) assumes responsibility for the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command in a ceremony hosted by Army Materiel Command Commanding General Gen. Ann E. Dunwoody at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Feb. 10. Maj. Gen. Nick Justice (right) had served as RDECOM commander since Dec. 4, 2009.

 

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command changed leaders Feb. 10, welcoming a civilian executive at the helm for the first time.

Dale A. Ormond assumed responsibility in a ceremony at the APG Post Theater. About 500 Soldiers, Army civilians and local elected officials attended Ormond’s introduction to the community.

ORMOND TAKES REINS

Ormond is the first civilian to lead RDECOM since the Army created the command in 2004. He assumed leadership from Maj. Gen. Nick Justice, the RDECOM and APG installation commander since Dec. 4, 2009.

Ormond thanked Justice for his 42 years of Army service and commitment to the nation.

“[Justice] has built a tremendous organization at RDECOM,” Ormond said. “Now comes our challenge to build upon that foundation.”

RDECOM’s employees must continue to support Soldiers with the best technology for current conflicts, as well as to defeat future adversaries, Ormond said.

“For the RDECOM employees, I have been so incredibly impressed with each of you. Each one of us has the central motivation to help a Soldier in the middle of nowhere execute their mission and come home safely,” Ormond said. “I don’t know that anyone does this more profoundly than our RDECOM employees do.

“To the men and women of RDECOM — we have a lot of work to do. We must continue to accelerate the work that is already in progress to support our Soldiers. I know you are up to the task.”

Ormond comes to RDECOM from the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., where he served as deputy to the commanding general since 2008. He previously served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army (Elimination of Chemical Weapons) and as acting Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Policy and Procurement.

Ormond is a 1985 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and holds a master of science in environmental systems engineering from Clemson University. He was selected for Senior Executive Service in 2004.

FAREWELL FOR JUSTICE

Justice joined the Army as an enlisted Soldier and earned his commission upon graduation from Officer Candidate School in 1977. He was promoted to major general in 2008.

Gen. Ann E. Dunwoody, commanding general of U.S. Army Materiel Command, praised Justice’s work to empower, unburden and protect America’s Soldiers. She also commended his efforts as a trailblazer in Army information technology.

“I was just issued my first Apple iPad. Nick Justice is the only guy in the entire Army who could teach me to use it,” Dunwoody said jokingly.

“The Army quickly recognized that we have a tech genius in Nick Justice,” Dunwoody said. “He had a greater impact on Army information systems and the way Soldiers communicate than anyone in our entire institution.

“Nick is the founding father of Army Knowledge Online. Today, it is the largest intranet in the world, but it all started with this man.”

Dunwoody also recognized Justice’s emphasis on inserting RDECOM’s scientific and engineering expertise into the operational Army. Through this accomplishment, the mission to empower, unburden and protect Warfighters has moved even closer to the battlefield.

“In a time when the need to get the benefits of science and engineering out to our Warfighters was never greater, Nick was there — on point — making sure it happened,” Dunwoody said. “He personally worked with the commanders in Iraq and Afghanistan to get science and technology embedded in our operational units.

“Nick has employed nearly 1,300 members around the globe. Now more than ever, RDECOM has a global presence, a global force and a global voice around the Army.”

Justice echoed Dunwoody’s remarks about RDECOM’s scientific contributions enhancing Soldiers’ capabilities.

“You heard General Dunwoody recognize our deployed capabilities. It will be an enduring presence in the future that will be integrated into the Army’s deployable capabilities,” Justice said. “That recognizes your skills, talents, importance and value to the operational Army.

“We have changed the very essence of war this decade much out of the strength and intellectual capacity of this organization. I salute you, RDECOM, for what you do for me and my brothers in arms.”

Justice thanked many of those in attendance — his fellow Soldiers, civilian employees, Gold Star Families, state and local elected officials, and his wife — for their support during his time at RDECOM and APG.

“We will always have you in our hearts. We will always be involved in the relationships and associations that we have established in this community. Thank you very much for what you done for me.

“This is one of the greatest assignments that a Soldier could ever have.”

RDECOM is made up of nearly 17,000 civilian researchers, scientists, engineers and support personnel. There are about 100 Soldiers assigned to provide important feedback to researchers developing technologies.

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

AMC commander tours Aberdeen Proving Ground

AMC commander tours Aberdeen Proving Ground

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The Army’s senior logistician toured here Sept. 16 meeting with military officials, speaking with Soldiers and civilian employees and viewing the transformation on the installation.

The Army is investing more than $1.4 billion in Aberdeen Proving Ground infrastructure to modernize the installation and prepare it for its new mission as the center for Army science and technology.

General Ann E. Dunwoody, Army Materiel Command commanding general, saw first-hand the state of the installation with a fly-over and a windshield tour.

Read more…

Like us on Facebook!Follow us on  Twitter!Contact us  on Flickr!Subscribe on YouTube!We're on CNN  iReport!Linkedin  discussions!


Bookmark and Share

, , , , ,

No Comments

German Delegation visits Army Research Laboratory

German Delegation visits Army Research Laboratory

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — A senior German defense official visited U.S. Army facilities Sept. 7-8. German Federal Office of Defense Technology and Procurement President Harald Stein met with Army Materiel Command Commanding General Gen. Ann E. Dunwoody at her Fort Belvoir, Va., headquarters Sept. 7. Stein is the general’s counterpart in Germany. Stein saw an overview of AMC operations.

The president toured Army Research Laboratory facilities at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. Sept. 8. Army Research Laboratory Technical Director John Miller hosted a luncheon, and Research, Development and Engineering Command and APG Commanding General Maj. Gen. Nick Justice presented Stein with a memento.

The visit is part of ongoing project agreements between Germany and the United States. Officials said the German delegation will organize a reciprocal visit to materiel technology facilities in Germany in 2011.

RDECOM - View my 'German Delegation visits Army Research Laboratory' set on Flickriver

Like us on Facebook!Follow us on  Twitter!Contact us  on Flickr!Subscribe on YouTube!We're on CNN  iReport!Linkedin  discussions!


Bookmark and Share

, , ,

No Comments

Media Advisory: Q&A Session with Under Secretary of the Army, U.S. Senator

Dwayne Calhoun, a Stryker Reset Facility instructor, briefs Under Secretary of the Army (USA) Dr. Joseph W. Westphal during a Joint Base Lewis-McChord tour, Aug. 13. (U.S. Army photo by SFC Raymond Piper.) This image has been cleared for public release.

DETROIT ARSENAL, Mich. — Under Secretary of the Army Joseph Westphal will meet with local military and government officials and automotive company executives here 12 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 26. The meeting is part of a continuing effort to underscore the role the domestic auto industry plays in continuing technology research, development and systems engineering for the Army’s and the Department of Defense’s combat and tactical vehicle fleets.

Hosting Under Secretary Westphal is U.S. Senator Carl Levin (Mich.). Levin serves as the Chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee. During his Michigan visit, Westphal will hear perspectives on Army collaboration initiatives from General Motors and Ford, and he will tour the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center’s research labs and testing facilities at the historic Detroit Arsenal. The Nation’s systems engineering and integration Ground Vehicle Center of Excellence, TARDEC and its collaborative partners influence the life cycle of every military wheeled, tracked and unmanned ground vehicle system. TARDEC Director Dr. Grace Bochenek will lead the by-invitation-only tour.

Currently, government employment at the U.S. Army Detroit Arsenal stands at about 6,900 people today. By 2014, those numbers are expected to swell to 8,400 government positions.

Construction taking place at the Arsenal includes TARDEC’s Ground Systems Power and Energy Laboratory. The Army broke ground on the 30,000-square-foot facility August 2009. The eight-labs-in-one complex will be unlike any other lab in the world. Its research and testing capabilities will advance power and energy for ground vehicles, further research into alternative energy and propulsion systems, and focus efforts to address critical combat vehicle requirements. The new lab is scheduled to open by September 2011.

Media interested in attending the question and answer session must RSVP to TACOM PAO Eric Emerton (586) 282-5663 or Don Jarosz (586) 282-8820.

Like us on Facebook!Follow us on  Twitter!Contact us  on Flickr!Subscribe on YouTube!We're on CNN  iReport!Linkedin  discussions!

, , ,

No Comments

High-tech radar maps defeat camouflage

High-tech radar maps defeat camouflage
 Kristen Kushiyama, RDECOM CERDEC Public Affairs Office

FORT BELVOIR, Va. — To the untrained eye, U.S. Army radar-generated maps may look like a bird’s-eye view of a city at night; however, these images contain useful intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance information that reveal concealed objects by penetrating foliage, buildings and some terrain while overcoming camouflage, concealment and deception techniques.

These maps, which highlight boundaries not visible to traditional electronic sensors, are made possible by the U.S. Army’s Tactical Reconnaissance and Counter Concealment Enabled Radar, or TRACER. Developed by the Research, Development and Engineering Command’s Communications-Electronics R&D center known as CERDEC, TRACER is a mid-range, long wavelength synthetic aperture radar system that provides all-weather persistent surveillance.

Read more…

CERDEC - View my 'TRACER VIP Presentation' set on Flickriver

Fan us on  Facebook!Follow us on  Twitter!Contact us  on Flickr!Subscribe on YouTube!We're on CNN  iReport!Linkedin  discussions!


Bookmark and Share

, , , , , , ,

No Comments

Army technology comes to life at ICT

CSM Marin visits ICT
INGLEWOOD, Calif. — In what appears to be a small office in an expansive industrial park near the University of Southern California, Army technology springs to life.

The Institute for Creative Technologies is the launch pad for nearly all simulation technologies for the U.S. Army. The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command has the important role of coordinating what is being developed and delivering it to Soldier.

Command Sgt. Maj. Hector Marin, RDECOM’s senior enlisted advisor, visited ICT today and was enthused by what he saw.

Read more…

Fan us on  Facebook!Follow us on  Twitter!Contact us  on Flickr!Subscribe on YouTube!We're on CNN  iReport!Linkedin  discussions!


Bookmark and Share

, , , ,

1 Comment

Army secretary tours research, development facilities

Army secretary visits Night Vision Lab
FORT BELVOIR, Va. — Army Secretary John McHugh toured research and development facilities here March 15. The Army’s senior civilian leader received briefings and hands-on time with high-tech gear, including night vision devices, next generation batteries, extremely accurate mortar rounds, explosive device detection gear and the latest recipes for Soldier cuisine in the field.

During his brief visit to the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s Night Vision and Electronic Sensor facility, the secretary put M-16 rifle rounds on target in near complete darkness using a night vision device. The 90-meter indoor range offers complete control over light conditions.
Read more…

RDECOM - View my 'Army secretary tours research, development facilities' set on Flickriver

Fan us on  Facebook!Follow us on Twitter!Contact us  on Flickr!Subscribe on YouTube!We're on CNN  iReport!Linkedin  discussions!


Bookmark and Share

, , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments