Tag Archives: technology

Army technology team helps field robot

The PackBot 510 robot undergoes final testing at the Robot Logistics Support Center. (U.S. Army photo)

By Dan Lafontaine, RDECOM Public Affairs

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Dec. 18, 2015) — U.S. Army science and technology advisors have initiated a project to field a robot capable of assessing chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, explosives, or CBRNE, threats from a safe distance.

Several Army organizations combined on a new variant of the PackBot 510 robot with enhanced CBRNE detection capabilities.

“These robots are one-of-a-kind and filled a critical gap for Soldiers on the front lines in Korea,” said Lt. Col. Mark Meeker, field assistance in science and technology advisor assigned to U.S. Forces Korea.

Drones swarm U.S. Army’s Network Integration Evaluation

By John Hamilton

WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE, N.M. (Sept. 30, 2015) — In this season’sNetwork Integration Evaluation, or NIE, taking place on White Sands Missile Range, or WSMR, and Fort Bliss, Texas, coordinated units of remotely-operated and automated aircraft will be used to represent a possible threat on tomorrow’s battlefields.

Members of the Targets Management Office with U.S. Army Program Executive Office for Simulation Training and Instrumentation, or PEO STRI, are using off-the-shelf quad and octocopters and flying them in groups. The endeavor is part of an U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command, or ATEC, program to study possible use, effectiveness and countermeasures for the deployment of large numbers of synchronized drone aircraft.

“ATEC is our customer, they tasked us to come out and look at swarming, the variations and the payloads we can apply to this,” said James Story, an engineer with the Targets Management Office, PEO STRI. “We saw this as a threat that wasn’t being addressed and ATEC agreed.”

While drones are seeing expanded use, with many different countries building, deploying, and selling large airplane-sized drones for military purposes, small-scale drones are still gaining a foothold, mostly due to the technical limitations involved. That technology is expected to improve, and the small-scale drone become more viable as a possible weapon, and it’s that preparation for the future that is driving the swarming project.

“Right now there’s hardly anyone doing swarms, most people are flying one, maybe two, but any time you can get more than one or two in the air at the same time, and control them by waypoint with one laptop, that’s important,” Story said. “You’re controlling all five of them, and all five of them are a threat.”

Army official: Innovate to win in a complex world; Invest in science, technology to confront future threats

Takeoff and landing are the two most dangerous periods for any aircraft, a danger that is particularly intense for a helicopter caught in a brownout. Army researchers are developing technology solutions to help pilots in Degraded Visual Environments. (U.S. Army photo)

Takeoff and landing are the two most dangerous periods for any aircraft, a danger that is particularly intense for a helicopter caught in a brownout. Army researchers are developing technology solutions to help pilots in Degraded Visual Environments. (U.S. Army photo)


By Heidi Shyu, Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology

Heidi Shyu, Army Acquisition Executive (U.S. Army photo)

Heidi Shyu, Army Acquisition Executive (U.S. Army photo)

In October 2014, the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command rolled out the latest Army Operating Concept, or AOC, entitled “Win in a Complex World.”

It details how the Army of the future will strengthen capabilities across multiple domains as part of a joint partnership to ensure dominance against “determined, elusive, and increasingly capable enemies.”

Simultaneously, it challenges our forces to “conduct expeditionary maneuver through rapid deployment and transition to operations.

The increasing proliferation of technologies to diverse and capable enemies means the Army must be prepared for a wider and more varied threat picture than ever before. This issue of Army AL&T explores ways the Army employs innovative solutions to ensure our continued dominance, including science and technology (S&T) investments valued at approximately $2.5 billion per year. This includes research performed in Army laboratories, individual research projects at universities, the work of university-affiliated research centers and innovations from small and large companies.

The Army funds critical S&T investments not available in commercial products to enable us to develop breakthrough products that will shape the Army of the future.

I will highlight two examples in Army aviation: the Improved Turbine Engine Program, or ITEP, and the Degraded Visual Environment Mitigation, known as DVE-M.

Army to enlist robots to pull Soldiers off battlefield

One day, unmanned vehicles, similar to but larger than this small unmanned ground vehicle, may roll onto battlefields to rescue downed Soldiers, said the commander of the Army Medical Department Center and School. (U.S. Army photo by Stephen Baack)

One day, unmanned vehicles, similar to but larger than this small unmanned ground vehicle, may roll onto battlefields to rescue downed Soldiers, said the commander of the Army Medical Department Center and School. (U.S. Army photo by Stephen Baack)

WASHINGTON (Army News Service, Sept. 22, 2015) — Most Americans have seen at least one war movie, where at some point a fresh-faced young private is hit with some shrapnel. From the ground, he calls out for the unit medic — another young guy, from another small town, whose quick reaction and skill just may save his life.

In the near future, however, it may no longer be another Soldier, who comes running to his side. Instead, it might be an Army-operated unmanned aerial or ground vehicle, said Maj. Gen. Steve Jones, commander of the U.S. Army Medical Department Center and Schooland chief of the Medical Corps.

“We have lost medics throughout the years because they have the courage to go forward and rescue their comrades under fire,” Jones said. “With the newer technology, with the robotic vehicles we are using even today to examine and to detonate IEDs [improvised explosive devices], those same vehicles can go forward and retrieve casualties.

Jones spoke at an Association of the U.S. Army-sponsored medical conference near the Pentagon, Sept. 22.

“We already use robots on the battlefield today to examine IEDs, to detonate them,” he said. “With some minor adaptation, we could take that same technology and use it to extract casualties that are under fire. How many medics have we lost, or other Soldiers, because they have gone in under fire to retrieve a casualty? We can use a robotics device for that.”

Jones said unmanned vehicles used to recover injured Soldiers could be armored to protect those Soldiers on their way home. But the vehicles could do more than just recover Soldiers, he said. With units operating forward, sometimes behind enemy lines, the medical community could use unmanned aerial vehicle systems, or UAVs, to provide support to them.

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American science team visits Nigeria

(From left to right)Lt. Cmdr. US Edom, lab officer, Ministry of Defence Health Implementation Programme; Wing Commander EK Ojemen, pharmacist/logistics, MODHIP; Robert Nelson, U.S. DOD Walter Reed Program-Nigeria; Brig. Gen. NA Hussain, director general, MODHIP; and Army Maj. Brian Hannah, science advisor, Field Assistance in Science and Technology for the U.S. Africa Command. (Courtesy photo)

(From left to right)Lt. Cmdr. US Edom, lab officer, Ministry of Defence Health Implementation Programme; Wing Commander EK Ojemen, pharmacist/logistics, MODHIP; Robert Nelson, U.S. DOD Walter Reed Program-Nigeria; Brig. Gen. NA Hussain, director general, MODHIP; and Army Maj. Brian Hannah, science advisor, Field Assistance in Science and Technology for the U.S. Africa Command. (Courtesy photo)

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Sept. 25, 2015) — A U.S. Army science advisor traveled to Nigeria Sept. 16, 2015, along with a team of U.S. Department of Defense medical officials to evaluate laboratory operations.

Army Maj. Brian Hannah, science advisor from the Field Assistance in Science and Technology for the U.S. Africa Command, said his goal on the trip was to access the Nigerian military’s capacity “to respond to another infectious disease outbreak and develop a comprehensive plan to build capacity.”

Also on the team: Col. Steven Thomas, Deputy Commander Walter Reed Army Institute of Research; Col. Nelson Michael, Director US Military HIV Research Program; Navy Capt. Patrick Blair, executive officer for Naval Medical Research Unit 3; Robbie Nelson, Walter Reed Program-Nigeria Country Director; Lt. Col. Julie Ake, deputy director Military HIV Research Program; Col. Matt Hepburn, program manager Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency; and Lt. Joe Diclaro, technical advisor for the Liberian Institute for Biomedical Research.

(Courtesy photo)

“Our team engaged with our partners from the Nigerian Ministry of Defence Health Implementation Programme and toured the Defence Reference Laboratory (in Abuja), 445 Nigerian Air Force Hospital and Laboratory (in Lagos) and the 68 Nigerian Army Reference Hospital Yaba,” Hannah said.

Hannah said he is developing a recommendation to AFRICOM for a health diplomacy package, which is currently in the draft stage.

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Army maximizes efficient fire strikes

Looking at their chest-mounted screens, Soldiers practice accessing the Leader/Soldier Effects Tool Suite during a hands-on demonstration in July on Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey. The three Soldiers are assigned to the Experimental Force, Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment in Fort Benning, Georgia. (U.S. Army photo by Edric Thompson)

Looking at their chest-mounted screens, Soldiers practice accessing the Leader/Soldier Effects Tool Suite during a hands-on demonstration in July on Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey. The three Soldiers are assigned to the Experimental Force, Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment at Fort Benning, Georgia. (U.S. Army photo by Edric Thompson)

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (Sept. 8, 2015) — Crouched on the desert floor, a Soldier watches an enemy vehicle rolling in the distance and gauges its range to her platoon. However, when she’s calculated the distance, rather than radio her platoon leader, the Soldier grabs her phone and relays the information with a software system called the Leader/Soldier Effects Tool Suite.

The tool suite, also known as LETS, is designed to provide the dismounted Soldier the capability to plan, coordinate and execute fires quickly and efficiently.

LETS functions on hand-held devices, such as mobile phones, and vehicle platforms. Its users can share firing details including range assessment, battle damage assessment, weapon emplacement, and control measures.

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Army science, technology team advances language translation in Africa

Members of the Zambian Defense Force march with U.S. Army soldiers during the opening day ceremony for Exercise Southern Accord in Lusaka, Zambia on Aug. 4. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Brian Kimball)

Members of the Zambian Defense Force march with U.S. Army soldiers during the opening day ceremony for Exercise Southern Accord in Lusaka, Zambia on Aug. 4. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Brian Kimball)

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Aug. 5, 2015) — A U.S. Army team is testing and helping to develop a language translator to enable Soldiers communicate with their African counterparts.

Improving the ability of American service members to communicate in foreign languages, particularly in French dialects, is becoming critical in Africa, said Maj. Eddie Strimel, the Field Assistance in Science and Technology, or FAST, advisor assigned to U.S. Army Africa, or USARAF.

U.S. Soldiers conduct training and exercises regularly in about 20 of Africa’s 54 countries, he said.

“We believe Africa is a future frontier for technology in the next 10 to 15 years. French is a priority for us. If we can get these dialects developed with this type of system, it will benefit the Army, Air Force and Marines down the road,” he said.

FAST advisors, both uniformed officers and Army civilians, are a link between Soldiers in the field and the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s subject matter experts.

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Exclusive Interview with the Honorable Heidi Shyu

photoAssistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology Heidi Shyu serves as the Army acquisition executive, the senior procurement executive, science advisor to the Secretary of the Army, and the Army’s senior research and development official. She also has principal responsibility for all Department of the Army matters related to logistics. She appoints and manages program executive officers and manages the Army Acquisition Corps and Army Acquisition Workforce.

What is your vision for ASA(ALT) collaboration with industry, academia and other organizations?

I think collaboration is really essential. No single person or organization possesses a monopoly on innovative ideas. It is critical for us to collaborate with industry, academia, federally funded R&D centers and other government organizations to solve difficult problems. So my vision is that we will collaborate across the board to spur innovation.

In the S&T arena, we work closely with academia. We also have the Broad Agency Announcement, small business forums, cross–service collaboration on Research, Development, Test and Evaluation. We collaborate with DARPA and university affiliated research centers. We have individual investigator grants and collaborations with partner nations. Defense companies are willing to invest their R&D dollars to help solve the Army’s challenges, so we need to dialogue with them to inform them of our challenges and stay abreast of their ideas, design and development activities. The goal is to get a multitude of ideas to figure out how to solve problems. Collaboration is critical.

How do you see technology providing Soldiers with the decisive edge?

There are many technologies that can provide Soldiers with the decisive edge. One of our key goals is to develop lighter and stronger armor. Why? Because it will enhance survivability and improve mobility. We’re also developing initiatives like continuous soldier health sensing and monitoring, disruptive energetic materials that could provide increased lethality, bio-inspired sensing to eliminate tactical surprise, and energy harvesting to reduce our dependence on fuel.

How do budget concerns affect your vision?

The Army has by and large protected its S&T budget. The rest of the budget has faced double-digit reductions. The American Soldier is the best equipped in the world – thanks to our materiel enterprise. We must continue to invest in S&T in order to equip our Soldier of the future.

We have focused on a 30-year plan, called the long-range investment requirements analysis, or LIRA, which is enabling us to link S&T efforts to programs of record. This will allow us to focus our research activities to address capability shortfalls.

How does ASA(ALT) partner with U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, its centers and laboratories?

The partnership we have with RDECOM is critical. RDECOM plays a very important role across all of the PEOs and the acquisition community by providing critical functions and skill sets such as research, development, systems engineering, design, performance analysis, modeling and simulation, software, reliability analysis, prototyping, integration and test, and more. For example:

  • CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate S&T provided our Soldiers the ability to dominate the night
  • NSRDEC has provided transportable high energy efficient shower units, kitchen units and shelters
  • AMRDEC has provided critical missile expertise to PEO Missile & Space
  • TARDEC has provided high-fidelity modeling and simulation capabilities that accurately predict blast effects on our vehicles and enable us to design more survivable vehicles to reduce injuries to our Soldiers
  • All of CERDEC has provided technical assessment of the effectiveness of our tactical radios

What are your expectations from Army researchers, scientists and engineers?

It’s important for our Army researchers, scientists and engineers to stay fully abreast of the latest technologies and where the research is going. They really have to be masters of their domain to solve the Army’s difficult problems. We rely on them to give us the next generation of capabilities.

I’d like to see tighter linkages between the S&T community with the PMs, PEOs and the requirements community to ensure relevance, especially in this fiscally challenged environment. Ultimately we must understand the art of the possible and how to structure that for the future. As we look at the S&T capabilities we need to develop, I think it is critical for our researchers to tie into our 30-year road-map.

One of the key things I think the Army needs to do is ensure we provide our people with a research environment where they can innovate. We have world-class scientists and engineers in their field, and they are highly motivated to solve the most difficult problems for our Soldiers. I’ve had the pleasure of meeting many of our outstanding researchers, scientists and engineers, and I really admire their dedication, passion for their work and innovation. I’m very impressed with our caliber of researchers, and they are the critical enablers for us to develop the next generation of capabilities for our Soldiers.

Daniel R. McGauley (left), RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center executive officer, describes a Common Remotely Operated Weapons Station thermal imager protective cover designed and fabricated by his team at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Jan. 15, 2013 during a visit from Maj. Gen. Harold Greene, deputy for acquisition and systems management at ASA (ALT); Heidi Shyu, assistant secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology; and Gen. Dennis L. Via, commanding general, Army Materiel Command. (U.S. Army photo)

Daniel R. McGauley (left), RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center executive officer, describes a Common Remotely Operated Weapons Station thermal imager protective cover designed and fabricated by his team at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Jan. 15, 2013 during a visit from Maj. Gen. Harold Greene, deputy for acquisition and systems management at ASA (ALT); Heidi Shyu, assistant secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology; and Gen. Dennis L. Via, commanding general, Army Materiel Command. (U.S. Army photo)

Biography

Collaboration to Alliance

Industry, academia and government collaboration highlights different approaches

By Joyce Brayboy, ARL Public Affairs

Collaboration

Collaborative Technology and Research Alliances are partnerships between the Army, industry and academia that are focusing on the rapid transition of innovative technologies for the Army’s future force.

The collaboration between industry, academia and the government is a key element of the alliance concept as each member brings with it a distinctly different approach to research.

ARL researchers pull from the expertise of Research, Development and Engineering Command organizations to keep the program oriented toward solving the Army’s technology challenges.

Academia is instrumental for its cutting-edge innovation; the industrial partners are able to leverage existing research results for transition and to deal with technology bottlenecks.

The multidisciplinary research teams bring together world class research and development talent and focus it on the Soldier.

ARL has a history of successful collaborations bringing together the triad of industry, academia and government, dating back to the 1990s.

There are currently four active CTAs:

Two Collaborative Research Alliances, or CRAs, were awarded in 2012: Electronic Materials, and Materials in Extreme Dynamic Environments. Finally, the most recent Collaborative Research Alliance in the area of Cyber Security was announced last year.

Each CTA and CRA has a distinctive mission and focus. The MAST CTA conducts research and transitions technology that will enhance warfighter’s tactical situational awareness in urban and complex terrain through the autonomous systems. The Network Science CTA performs cross-cutting research of common underlying science among social and cognitive, information, and communications networks to enhance effectiveness in network-enabled warfare.

The Robotics CTA enables the creation of future highly autonomous unmanned systems and permits those systems to conduct military operations in mixed environments.

The Cognition and Neuroergonomics CTA conducts research leading to fundamental translational principles of the application of neuroscience-based research and theory to complex operational settings.

The Multi-Scale Multidisciplinary Modeling of Electronic Materials CRA is developing a quantitative understanding of materials from the atomic scales to advance the state of the art in electronic, optoelectronic and electrochemical materials and devices.

The Materials in Extreme Dynamic Environments CRA is establishing the capability to design materials for use in specific dynamic environments, especially high strain-rate applications.

The most recent CRA came about when ARL established a group led by Pennsylvania State University last year. The alliance includes ARL, CERDEC, academia and industry researchers to explore the basic foundations of cyber-science issues in the context of Army networks.

For information about the Collaborative Technology or Research Alliances, call Kelly Foster at (301) 394-5503.

ARL, University partnerships

Bringing together research and development talent to improve the ability of the Army’s Future Force

By Jenna Brady, ARL Public Affairs

To develop revolutionary capabilities for Soldiers on the battlefield, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory brings together world-class research and development talent by leveraging the vast intellectual capital of the nation’s universities.

The lab makes this possible through programs and alliances including University Affiliated Research Centers, Collaborative Technology Alliances and Collaborative Research Alliances.

UARCs are university-led collaborations among universities, industry and Army laboratories that conduct basic, applied and technology demonstration research.

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International partnering is a win-win proposition: RFEC Atlantic

U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command scientists and engineers are stationed around the globe to explore international collaboration opportunities in scientific research and technology development, opportunities that will potentially close capability gaps for the U.S. Army.

Three regional RDECOM Forward Element Commands, known as RFECs, represent this international endeavor:

  • RFEC Atlantic
  • RFEC Americas
  • RFEC Pacific

From basic science to insights on maturing technology, foreign research contributes to the development of U.S. products and provides solutions that improve American capabilities.

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U.S. Army, Australian leaders talk research, development cooperation

Dale A. Ormond (right), director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, discusses his organization with Dr. Alex Zelinsky, Australia’s chief defense scientist, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Jan. 27.

Dale A. Ormond (right), director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, discusses his organization with Dr. Alex Zelinsky, Australia’s chief defense scientist, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Jan. 27.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Jan. 28, 2014) — Australia’s chief defense scientist met with U.S. Army leaders Jan. 27 to explore opportunities for research and development partnerships.

The U.S. Army’s engagement with foreign partners in fostering science and engineering is essential to ensuring that Soldiers, as well as American allies, have access to the world’s best technology, said Dale A. Ormond, director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command.

“We are trying to expand our international outreach,” Ormond said. “Seventy percent of the money spent worldwide on science and technology is outside the U.S. There are great scientists and engineers everywhere. [It's important to] go find out who they are and work with them.”

Read more: http://go.usa.gov/BC6w

Army program secures critical component for artillery, mortar ammunition

Soldiers assigned to Bulldog Battery, Field Artillery Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment load a M777A2 Howitzer during 2CR's Maneuver Rehearsal Exercise at Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany, Feb. 13, 2013. The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition.

Soldiers assigned to Bulldog Battery, Field Artillery Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment load a M777A2 Howitzer during 2CR’s Maneuver Rehearsal Exercise at Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany, Feb. 13, 2013. The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition, officials said.

Because of changes in the global cotton industry, the United States no longer has a domestic source of quality raw material for manufacturing nitrocellulose for combustible cartridge cases that are used extensively by the military. A domestic source is necessary to ensure a sufficient supply of quality cartridge cases, which is vital to maintaining readiness of the armed forces, according to Army experts.

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http://go.usa.gov/ZtYJ

RDECOM discusses contracting opportunities at 2013 APBI

U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command representatives discuss contracting opportunities with visitors during the Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry conference at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Dec. 4.

U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command representatives discuss contracting opportunities with visitors during the Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry conference at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Dec. 4.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Dec. 5, 2013) — The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command presented upcoming contracts Dec. 4 during APG’s second annual Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry conference.

Mary Miller, deputy assistant secretary of the Army for Research and Technology, discussed the current state and the future of Army science and technology during her keynote speech at the APG Post Theater. She emphasized that the research and development community will serve a key role in shaping the Army’s future after 12 years of war.

“It’s important to understand the role of science and technology and the balance we have to strike. Our responsibility is to build the Army of the future, but we still need to take care of the Army that we currently have,” Miller said. “Our balance has been changing as circumstances dictate. In the last decade of war, we have spent a lot of our time and thought equity helping the current force through urgent requirements and needs coming out of theater.

“We determined how to fix those problems that Soldiers have and give them critical solutions. As we’re coming out of war, we’re seeing the need to get back to our roots and look to the Army of the future.”

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RDECOM demonstrates advances in Army power, energy at Pentagon

Katherine Hammack (left), assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, talks with Robert Berlin, a mechanical engineer with RDECOM's Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, in the Pentagon Courtyard Nov. 14.

Katherine Hammack (left), assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, talks with Robert Berlin, a mechanical engineer with RDECOM’s Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, in the Pentagon Courtyard Nov. 14.

WASHINGTON (Nov. 14, 2013) — The U.S. Army showcased how its research and engineering centers are enabling advances in operational energy for Soldiers Nov. 14 at the Pentagon.

Subject matter experts from across the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command discussed their work in technologies that included Soldier-borne electronics, ground-vehicle fuel efficiency and sustainable base camps.

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http://go.usa.gov/WPam

Army bolsters nation’s cybersecurity through STEM outreach

During the "Network and Cyber" week, students first learned about the complexities of computer networks and the steps required for a single e-mail to be sent. In this activity, more than 30 students each represented a step that an e-mail must take to go from one network to another as they sent a message across the classroom. The Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences course took place in July 2013 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

During the “Network and Cyber” week, students first learned about the complexities of computer networks and the steps required for a single e-mail to be sent. In this activity, more than 30 students each represented a step that an e-mail must take to go from one network to another as they sent a message across the classroom. The Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences course took place in July 2013 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Computer networks face persistent cyber threats from the nation’s adversaries. The future defenders of cyberspace, America’s students, honed their skills this summer as they learned from U.S. Army scientists and engineers who are experts in the field.

Cybersecurity practitioners from across the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command joined forces to spark an interest and share their knowledge with high-school students as part of the Army Educational Outreach Program at APG.

Two RDECOM organizations — Army Research Laboratory and the Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center — partnered to develop and deliver two Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences cyber programs in July.

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http://go.usa.gov/WrFC

‘Greening’ brings fresh perspectives for Army scientists, engineers

J.J. Kowal (left) and Walt Rada sit inside a LUH-72 Lakota at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Sept. 25.

J.J. Kowal (left) and Walt Rada sit inside a LUH-72 Lakota at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Sept. 25.

GUNPOWDER MILITARY RESERVATION, Md. — Thirty U.S. Army civilians now have a greater appreciation and understanding of the rigors and challenges associated with Soldier tasks.

Five days of intense training provided first-hand experience of the technical and physical demands on Soldiers.

Maj. Shane Sims, a military deputy at the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s communications and electronics center, led a Greening Course for the civilians from Aberdeen Proving Ground. One of his goals was for participants to think like Soldiers during the training rotations.

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http://go.usa.gov/DtAj

Army engineer helps build U.S., Chilean relationships

Jasmine Serlemitsos participated in the U.S. Army's Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program in Santiago, Chile, from September 2012 to July 2013.

Jasmine Serlemitsos participated in the U.S. Army’s Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program in Santiago, Chile, from September 2012 to July 2013.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. – An exchange program participant has expanded the relationships between the U.S. and Chilean scientists and engineers.

Jasmine Serlemitsos, a U.S. Army environmental engineer, said her goal was to strengthen the countries’ connections in science and technology. At the Chilean Army’s Institute of Research and Control, or IDIC, she worked in surveillance for the safe storage of ammunition.

“I focused my goals primarily on building relations between the people in the U.S. who did work in the ammunition side and learning how to do international agreements. [The Chileans] seemed very receptive to that,” said Serlemitsos, who served in Chile from September 2012 to July 2013 as part of the Army’s Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program.

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go.usa.gov/Dvp5

Army scientist advances biometrics through UK exchange program

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, participated in the Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program from August 2011 to July 2013. He worked at the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory's Sensors and Countermeasures Department.

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, participated in the Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program from August 2011 to July 2013. He worked at the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory’s Sensors and Countermeasures Department.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Oct. 23, 2013) — British and U.S. Army researchers are partnering to enhance biometric and surveillance capabilities as the result of an exchange program between the countries.

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, focused on advancing facial-recognition technologies during his two-year assignment in the United Kingdom.

“How far can we look and see who someone is? How can we help our Soldiers see better and farther?” said Leonard, who was assigned to the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory in Salisbury.

Leonard said he wanted to better understand how different countries approach similar scientific topics. When the DSTL chief executive visited Leonard’s organization to talk about possible collaborations, an area of mutual interest was biometrics. The discussions piqued Leonard’s interest.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/W3kG

Secretary of the Army visits Picatinny, assesses sequestration impact on R&D

Secretary of the Army John McHugh looks at a technology display during a visit to Picatinny Arsenal, N.J. McHugh visited the New Jersey military installation, which has been designated the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition, Sept. 26, 2013, to assess the effect of sequestration on the installation's efforts in research, development, acquisition and lifecycle management of weapon systems and ammunition. (U.S. Army photo by Erin Usawicz)

Secretary of the Army John McHugh looks at a technology display during a visit to Picatinny Arsenal, N.J. McHugh visited the New Jersey military installation, which has been designated the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition, Sept. 26, 2013, to assess the effect of sequestration on the installation’s efforts in research, development, acquisition and lifecycle management of weapon systems and ammunition. (U.S. Army photo by Erin Usawicz)

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (Sept. 26, 2013) — Secretary of the Army John McHugh was at the Picatinny Arsenal Thursday, to assess the effect of sequestration on the installation’s efforts in research, development, acquisition and lifecycle management of weapon systems and ammunition.

“This is a unique facility with a critically important mission; there really is no other government or industry counterpart to Picatinny,” McHugh said, underscoring the arsenal’s contribution to national security. “The workforce possesses knowledge and expertise that increases the lethality of the joint services warfighter.”

Picatinny Arsenal was designated the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition, providing products and services to all branches of the U.S. military.

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