Army preparing to produce JLTVs

Three different mission types of Joint Light Tactical Vehicles are driven offroad during the Technology Development phase which concluded in May 2011.

Three different mission types of Joint Light Tactical Vehicles are driven offroad during the Technology Development phase which concluded in May 2011.

 

ARLINGTON, Va. (Army News Service, July 27, 2011) — After refining requirements during a two-year Technology Development phase for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, Army developers are poised to conduct a full and open competition geared toward formal production, service officials said.

The Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, or JLTV, will be a next-generation light vehicle designed to bring Soldiers an unprecedented blend of protection, payload and performance, said Tim Goddette, director of Sustainment Systems.

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Engineering expertise leads to $1.6B savings

U.S. Army Special Operations Soldiers, assigned to the Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force in Afghanistan, arrive in an FMTV at a staging area on an undisclosed Forward Operating Base. Changes to cab procurements for the FMTV A1P2 have resulted in savings of approximately $1.4 billion to the Army. (U.S. Army photo by SPC Daniel Love.)

U.S. Army Special Operations Soldiers, assigned to the Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force in Afghanistan, arrive in an FMTV at a staging area on an undisclosed Forward Operating Base. Changes to cab procurements for the FMTV A1P2 have resulted in savings of approximately $1.4 billion to the Army. (U.S. Army photo by SPC Daniel Love.)

For the ninth consecutive year, the TACOM Life Cycle Management Command (LCMC) surpassed its fiscal year savings goal, amassing a record $1.6 billion in savings and exceeding its target by 884 percent by implementing value engineering proposals.

In June 2011, the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s tank and automotive center’s  Engineering Cost Reduction Team — which manages TACOM LCMC’s VE programs — and Program Manager Medium Tactical Vehicles, were honored with the Department of Defense VE Award for their achievements.

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Out of the classroom and into the field

 

TARDEC Senior Research Scientist for Robotics Dr. Jim Overholt addresses participants during opening ceremonies for the 19th Annual IGVC June 3, 2011. College students from across the world competed in robotics challenges, including a navigational course and an autonomous challenge. The program is part of TARDEC’s ongoing commitment to develop future scientists and engineers and provide students with real-world expertise to prepare them for future careers. (U.S. Army TARDEC photos by Chris Williams).

TARDEC Senior Research Scientist for Robotics Dr. Jim Overholt addresses participants during opening ceremonies for the 19th Annual IGVC June 3, 2011. College students from across the world competed in robotics challenges, including a navigational course and an autonomous challenge. The program is part of TARDEC’s ongoing commitment to develop future scientists and engineers and provide students with real-world expertise to prepare them for future careers. (U.S. Army TARDEC photos by Chris Williams).

Forty teams from around the world converged June 3–6, 2011, on Oakland University’s campus in Rochester, MI, for the 19th Annual Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition, hosted by the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center and the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International. The culmination of many of the Army’s robotics education programs, IGVC allows future scientists and engineers the chance to get their hands dirty developing systems with real-world applications.

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Robotics technology may keep Soldiers far from harm

 

A TALON robot inspects a suspected improvised explosive device. Robots such as TALON allow warfighters to clear routes quickly without having to wait for Explosive Ordnance Disposal teams to do so. Advancements in LDTO technology are making it possible to control these systems even further removed from the battlefield, increasing Soldier standoff distance. (U.S. Army photo by SGT Giancarlo Casem.)

A TALON robot inspects a suspected improvised explosive device. Robots such as TALON allow warfighters to clear routes quickly without having to wait for Explosive Ordnance Disposal teams to do so. Advancements in LDTO technology are making it possible to control these systems even further removed from the battlefield, increasing Soldier standoff distance. (U.S. Army photo by SGT Giancarlo Casem.)

 

Unmanned ground vehicles  allow Warfighters to perform surveillance, route clearance and threat defeat from safer distances. Tele-operation makes it possible for Warfighters to maintain even greater standoff distances while conducting these dangerous tasks.

The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering command’s tank and automotive center’ s advances may make it possible to perform these missions at an even greater distance, possibly far from the battlefield.

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Better vehicle coatings provide desert-ready advantages

 

The Army is using new polymeric-based flattening agents in paints to better camouflage vehicles from enemy IR detectors.

The Army is using new polymeric-based flattening agents in paints to better camouflage vehicles from enemy IR detectors.

When new automobiles are driven onto the showroom floor, manufacturers ensure they are glossy, sparkling and impossible to ignore.

Army ground vehicles demand the opposite approach. Instead of coatings that catch the eye, the Army paints its vehicles to blend in with their surroundings, using colors that mimic the landscapes. Coatings even include flattening agents to dull the finish, which makes tactical vehicles less noticeable to enemies.

“The paint manufacturers said these coatings actually make vehicles 20 degrees cooler. So if you’re in the desert and your ambient temperature is 130 degrees and the sun is glaring down on you, reflecting some of that heat back would be a good thing,” said Carl Handsy, TARDEC Materials and Corrosions Team Senior Engineer.

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DoE-DA Alliance underlines achieving energy security

Maj. Gen. Nick Justice speaks with Sen. Levin

U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command Commanding General Maj. Gen. Nick Justice and Sen. Levin prepare for two days of energy discussions at the AVPT workshop.

As the price of oil continues to fluctuate and the Nation searches for fuel-efficiency and an energy future independent of foreign oil, the U.S. Department of Energy and Department of the Army are collaborating to address this pressing national security issue.

The Advanced Vehicle Power and Technology Alliance aligns experts from across DoE, DA and industry to explore solutions for decreasing petroleum dependence, increasing fuel efficiency and enhancing the Nation’s energy security infrastructure. “We have the same vision,” remarked U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center Director Dr. Grace M. Bochenek. “This is a good partnership that will provide us the opportunity to share capabilities and access resources that we couldn’t alone. It will help us accelerate technology development, drive innovation, increase the value of our research investments and, at the same time, address the national energy need.”

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Media report: Army researchers seek energy savings

Energy innovations in the Armed Forces

The Army Research Laboratory is working on advanced battery research is helping reduce the number of generators and batteries that units need to take into battle.

energyNOW! reports: “The sun is a big part of the Air Force and Army’s plans for alternative fuels. In “Energy Innovations in the Armed Forces,” Correspondent Lee Patrick Sullivan learns how the Air Force is using the largest solar array in the Western Hemisphere to help reach a 20 percent renewable-energy goal by 2020. Lee Patrick dons full battle gear to find out why soldiers are replacing heavy batteries and generators with smaller, lighter ones. He also takes a ride in a prototype extended range electric vehicle and unrolls a solar blanket for charging electronics in a war zone.”

“Cynthia Lundgren of the Army Research Laboratory in Maryland explains how advanced battery research is helping reduce the number of generators and batteries that units need to take into battle. Paul Skalny of the Army’s Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center tells Lee Patrick how hybrid electric vehicles can give U.S. forces an advantage in the field, and how many fewer lives are put at risk with each incremental increase in fuel efficiency.”

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Survivability, Stability, mobility and sustainability drive requirements for Army’s new infantry fighting vehicle



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TARDEC High-Performance Computing/Data Management Engineers Aimee Carper, Nausheen Amir and Ivan Wong work at TARDEC’s Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE). Users stand inside the CAVE wearing special glasses to view 3-dimensional graphics the CAVE generates.

To meet the challenges faced in the continuously evolving combat environment, Soldiers today need an infantry fighting vehicle (IFV) that provides increased levels of protection capable of full-spectrum operations. To achieve this, the Army is focused on developing a versatile, highly survivable ground combat vehicle that will meet an array of anticipated future requirements.

The Ground Combat Vehicle is a key part of the Army’s combat vehicle modernization effort and intended to be the most adaptable IFV in the ground fleet. It will be designed around a 9-man infantry squad to provide highly protected mobile transport to decisive locations on the battlefield. The GCV will also provide the needed force protection against a full spectrum of operational threats, including improvised explosive devices and landmines. No single tactical vehicle available today can provide this combination of capabilities.

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Science, technology NCOs focus on professional development

RDECOM NCOs visit TARDEC

A group of RDECOM Soldiers gets a hands-on demonstration of the latest robotic technology at the U.S. Army Tank, Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center’s Joint Center for Robotics.

WARREN, Mich. — Being warfighter focused is more than just a catch phrase. At the U.S. Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command, the warfighter is central to every mission.

A group of 37 noncommissioned officers from across the command, laboratories and research center met for an intense professional development event at to the U.S. Army Tank, Automotive, Research, Development and Engineering Center March 7-11. The group engaged scientists and engineers discussing the ever-changing technological needs and requirements of today’s Warfighter.

For more, go to http://go.usa.gov/24y

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Top Army Scientists Seek Lighter, Tougher Materials to Increase Survivability

TARDEC Chief Scientist Dr. David Gorsich addresses attendees during the GSID Materials Workshop, held recently at Macomb Community College. During the workshop, associates from throughout the Army’s ground vehicle community gathered to discuss new materials that could make vehicles lightweight, safer and more mission-effective. (U.S. Army TARDEC photo)

“New materials are being developed, and the key question is, ‘What should the Ground Systems Integration Domain follow or support in the material science program?’ We need to make sure we’re paying attention and participating in material science advances. We may find that a better material exists but isn’t being integrated into our ground vehicles, and we need to find out why.” — Dr. David Gorsich, Chief Scientist, U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center

The development and integration of new materials onto the U.S. Army’s ground vehicle fleet is crucial to providing warfighters with survivable, mission-effective systems.

As Army engineers strive to enhance vehicle capabilities without overburdening vehicle space, weight, power and cooling (SWaP-C) requirements, researchers and developers throughout the Army’s GSID are working closely with partners in industry and academia to examine new materials and composites that could provide important solutions to challenges facing the ground vehicle community.

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HTUF Builds Collaborative Momentum to Bring Hybrids to Military

It’s not often you see a hybrid-powered military vehicle leading a convoy that includes a utility bucket truck, a beverage hauler and a parcel delivery van. Yet, this unique combination of vehicles, driving single file outside a hotel and shopping mall in Dearborn, Mich., represented 10 years of collaboration between the U.S. Army, the commercial truck industry and truck users from throughout the country.

The convoy was unique not only for the diverse capabilities of each vehicle and the variety of transportation jobs they represented, but also for the powertrain systems they employed. Together, the vehicles made up the world’s largest convoy of hybrid-electric and hybrid-hydraulic trucks, rolling out to celebrate the closing day of the 10th annual Hybrid Truck Users Forum, supported by the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center’s National Automotive Center and its non-profit transportation industry partner CALSTART, working under contract to the Army.

A record 700 attendees — including fleet users, engineers, industry VIPs and government leaders — convened for HTUF in fall 2010 to discuss the latest needs and solutions in the development of hybrid vehicles and celebrate their accomplishments.

Read more: http://www.tardec.info/gvsetnews/article.cfm?iID=0801&aid=09

Hybrid truck experts from throughout the country converged on Dearborn, Mich., for the 10th Annual Hybrid Truck Users Forum

Army considers the future of wheeled tactical vehicles

Army considers the future of wheeled tactical vehicles

WASHINGTON – People attending the 2010 Association of the United States Army annual meeting are interested in learning about what the future holds.

Imagine a time when a U.S. Army convoy speeds through a road known for sniper attacks. If an attack should occur, Soldiers in this potential future are much better prepared. Touch screen displays, cameras and sensors spread information throughout the convoy giving Warfighters situational awareness and real-time information. Technology keeps leaders informed.

That’s the vision for a team of engineers from the Research, Development and Engineering Command’s tank and automotive center. They’re working the convention floor Oct. 25-27 at the Washington Convention Center to talk about the future of tactical wheeled vehicles.

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RDECOM organizes to maximize integration

RDECOM Town Hall

Maj. Gen. Nick Justices points to the future as he addresses the assembled RDECOM staff. (Photo by Conrad Johnson)

The commander of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, gathered his military and civilian staff at the Edgewood Area Conference Center Oct. 4 to inaugurate the organization’s future.

The emphasis, Maj. Gen. Nick Justice said, is on integration.

“We don’t want an all-star team,” Justice said. “What we want is the best team in the country. We can create greater capacity and greater strength with the sum of the parts of this organization. You can see the power of that integration.”

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Media Advisory: Q&A Session with Under Secretary of the Army, U.S. Senator

Dwayne Calhoun, a Stryker Reset Facility instructor, briefs Under Secretary of the Army (USA) Dr. Joseph W. Westphal during a Joint Base Lewis-McChord tour, Aug. 13. (U.S. Army photo by SFC Raymond Piper.) This image has been cleared for public release.

DETROIT ARSENAL, Mich. — Under Secretary of the Army Joseph Westphal will meet with local military and government officials and automotive company executives here 12 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 26. The meeting is part of a continuing effort to underscore the role the domestic auto industry plays in continuing technology research, development and systems engineering for the Army’s and the Department of Defense’s combat and tactical vehicle fleets.

Hosting Under Secretary Westphal is U.S. Senator Carl Levin (Mich.). Levin serves as the Chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee. During his Michigan visit, Westphal will hear perspectives on Army collaboration initiatives from General Motors and Ford, and he will tour the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center’s research labs and testing facilities at the historic Detroit Arsenal. The Nation’s systems engineering and integration Ground Vehicle Center of Excellence, TARDEC and its collaborative partners influence the life cycle of every military wheeled, tracked and unmanned ground vehicle system. TARDEC Director Dr. Grace Bochenek will lead the by-invitation-only tour.

Currently, government employment at the U.S. Army Detroit Arsenal stands at about 6,900 people today. By 2014, those numbers are expected to swell to 8,400 government positions.

Construction taking place at the Arsenal includes TARDEC’s Ground Systems Power and Energy Laboratory. The Army broke ground on the 30,000-square-foot facility August 2009. The eight-labs-in-one complex will be unlike any other lab in the world. Its research and testing capabilities will advance power and energy for ground vehicles, further research into alternative energy and propulsion systems, and focus efforts to address critical combat vehicle requirements. The new lab is scheduled to open by September 2011.

Media interested in attending the question and answer session must RSVP to TACOM PAO Eric Emerton (586) 282-5663 or Don Jarosz (586) 282-8820.

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Maker Faire Detroit makes a mark

Around Maker Faire Detroit

By ROGER TEEL, Research, Development and Engineering Command Public Affairs

DEARBORN, Mich. — As Maker Faire Detroit becomes a memory, a glow continues to burn in the hearts and minds of all who took part. The event held July 31-Aug. 1 at the spacious Henry Ford here. Organizers describe the event as “a family fun festival to make, create, learn, invent, craft, recycle, build, think, play and be inspired by celebrating arts, crafts, engineering, food, music, science and technology.”

The venue was ideal for visitors as $28 tickets to Maker Faire included entry to The Henry Ford, the world’s premiere history destination and a National Historic Landmark that celebrates American history and innovation.

RDECOM - View my 'Around Maker Faire Detroit' set on Flickriver

Australia, U.S. name finalists in worldwide robotics competition

Australia, U.S. name finalists in worldwide robotics competition

U.S. ARMY DETROIT ARSENAL, Mich. – Six high-tech science and technology teams from four continents have been named finalists in the inaugural Multi Autonomous Ground-Robotic International Challenge. Teams from the United States, Turkey, Japan and Australia have been selected by the U.S. and the Australian departments of defense to compete this November in Australia in an effort to develop the next generation of fully-autonomous ground robots.

Dr. Grace Bochenek, U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center director, announced the finalists today who will compete at the Royal Showground in Adelaide, South Australia, Nov. 8-13.

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Australian, U.S. officials meet to plan robotics challenge

MAGIC 2010 Planning Conference

NAPA VALLEY, Calif. — Australian and American military officials met here July 20-22 to plan for the Multi Autonomous Ground-robotic International Challenge (MAGIC 2010) Nov. 8-12 in Australia. Universities and industries from around the world will compete their robots. MAGIC is jointly sponsored by the Australian and U.S. Departments of Defense.

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U.S. Army technologies to star at inaugural Maker Faire Detroit

The U.S. Army’s Research, Development and Engineering Command will engage Makers – techies and Do-It-Yourself enthusiasts – from all over the nation at Maker Faire Detroit, July 31-Aug. 1.
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