Posts Tagged soldiers

Partnerships for Synergy

A U.S. Army Ranger assigned to 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, transmits information during Task Force Training on Camp Roberts, Calif., Jan. 31, 2014. Rangers constantly train to maintain their technical proficiency. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Steven Hitchcock)

A U.S. Army Ranger assigned to 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, transmits information during Task Force Training on Camp Roberts, Calif., Jan. 31, 2014. Rangers constantly train to maintain their technical proficiency. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Steven Hitchcock)

By Dan Rusin, RDECOM

Over the past 10 years, the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command has been striving to strengthen partnerships and collaborations to develop cutting edge technology for Soldiers.

One example is the technology enabled capability demonstration effort, known as TECDs. Through the synergy of partnerships and cooperation, TECDs are delivering many key technologies to fill official capability gaps identified by TRADOC.

The TECDs partner several independent efforts across and beyond RDECOM with larger Army goals and capability gaps. TECDs started as collective partner efforts by the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology under specific portfolio managers, to develop technology to meet some of the Army’s critical problem areas using solutions that can be demonstrated between 2014 and 2018. A key benefit to the partnership experience links RDECOM’s products to funding and programs of record.

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Army program secures critical component for artillery, mortar ammunition

Soldiers assigned to Bulldog Battery, Field Artillery Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment load a M777A2 Howitzer during 2CR's Maneuver Rehearsal Exercise at Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany, Feb. 13, 2013. The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition.

Soldiers assigned to Bulldog Battery, Field Artillery Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment load a M777A2 Howitzer during 2CR’s Maneuver Rehearsal Exercise at Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany, Feb. 13, 2013. The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition, officials said.

Because of changes in the global cotton industry, the United States no longer has a domestic source of quality raw material for manufacturing nitrocellulose for combustible cartridge cases that are used extensively by the military. A domestic source is necessary to ensure a sufficient supply of quality cartridge cases, which is vital to maintaining readiness of the armed forces, according to Army experts.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/ZtYJ

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RDECOM discusses contracting opportunities at 2013 APBI

U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command representatives discuss contracting opportunities with visitors during the Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry conference at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Dec. 4.

U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command representatives discuss contracting opportunities with visitors during the Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry conference at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Dec. 4.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Dec. 5, 2013) — The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command presented upcoming contracts Dec. 4 during APG’s second annual Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry conference.

Mary Miller, deputy assistant secretary of the Army for Research and Technology, discussed the current state and the future of Army science and technology during her keynote speech at the APG Post Theater. She emphasized that the research and development community will serve a key role in shaping the Army’s future after 12 years of war.

“It’s important to understand the role of science and technology and the balance we have to strike. Our responsibility is to build the Army of the future, but we still need to take care of the Army that we currently have,” Miller said. “Our balance has been changing as circumstances dictate. In the last decade of war, we have spent a lot of our time and thought equity helping the current force through urgent requirements and needs coming out of theater.

“We determined how to fix those problems that Soldiers have and give them critical solutions. As we’re coming out of war, we’re seeing the need to get back to our roots and look to the Army of the future.”

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‘Greening’ brings fresh perspectives for Army scientists, engineers

J.J. Kowal (left) and Walt Rada sit inside a LUH-72 Lakota at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Sept. 25.

J.J. Kowal (left) and Walt Rada sit inside a LUH-72 Lakota at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Sept. 25.

GUNPOWDER MILITARY RESERVATION, Md. — Thirty U.S. Army civilians now have a greater appreciation and understanding of the rigors and challenges associated with Soldier tasks.

Five days of intense training provided first-hand experience of the technical and physical demands on Soldiers.

Maj. Shane Sims, a military deputy at the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s communications and electronics center, led a Greening Course for the civilians from Aberdeen Proving Ground. One of his goals was for participants to think like Soldiers during the training rotations.

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http://go.usa.gov/DtAj

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Army engineer helps build U.S., Chilean relationships

Jasmine Serlemitsos participated in the U.S. Army's Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program in Santiago, Chile, from September 2012 to July 2013.

Jasmine Serlemitsos participated in the U.S. Army’s Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program in Santiago, Chile, from September 2012 to July 2013.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. – An exchange program participant has expanded the relationships between the U.S. and Chilean scientists and engineers.

Jasmine Serlemitsos, a U.S. Army environmental engineer, said her goal was to strengthen the countries’ connections in science and technology. At the Chilean Army’s Institute of Research and Control, or IDIC, she worked in surveillance for the safe storage of ammunition.

“I focused my goals primarily on building relations between the people in the U.S. who did work in the ammunition side and learning how to do international agreements. [The Chileans] seemed very receptive to that,” said Serlemitsos, who served in Chile from September 2012 to July 2013 as part of the Army’s Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program.

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go.usa.gov/Dvp5

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Army scientist advances biometrics through UK exchange program

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, participated in the Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program from August 2011 to July 2013. He worked at the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory's Sensors and Countermeasures Department.

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, participated in the Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program from August 2011 to July 2013. He worked at the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory’s Sensors and Countermeasures Department.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Oct. 23, 2013) — British and U.S. Army researchers are partnering to enhance biometric and surveillance capabilities as the result of an exchange program between the countries.

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, focused on advancing facial-recognition technologies during his two-year assignment in the United Kingdom.

“How far can we look and see who someone is? How can we help our Soldiers see better and farther?” said Leonard, who was assigned to the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory in Salisbury.

Leonard said he wanted to better understand how different countries approach similar scientific topics. When the DSTL chief executive visited Leonard’s organization to talk about possible collaborations, an area of mutual interest was biometrics. The discussions piqued Leonard’s interest.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/W3kG

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Secretary of the Army visits Picatinny, assesses sequestration impact on R&D

Secretary of the Army John McHugh looks at a technology display during a visit to Picatinny Arsenal, N.J. McHugh visited the New Jersey military installation, which has been designated the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition, Sept. 26, 2013, to assess the effect of sequestration on the installation's efforts in research, development, acquisition and lifecycle management of weapon systems and ammunition. (U.S. Army photo by Erin Usawicz)

Secretary of the Army John McHugh looks at a technology display during a visit to Picatinny Arsenal, N.J. McHugh visited the New Jersey military installation, which has been designated the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition, Sept. 26, 2013, to assess the effect of sequestration on the installation’s efforts in research, development, acquisition and lifecycle management of weapon systems and ammunition. (U.S. Army photo by Erin Usawicz)

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (Sept. 26, 2013) — Secretary of the Army John McHugh was at the Picatinny Arsenal Thursday, to assess the effect of sequestration on the installation’s efforts in research, development, acquisition and lifecycle management of weapon systems and ammunition.

“This is a unique facility with a critically important mission; there really is no other government or industry counterpart to Picatinny,” McHugh said, underscoring the arsenal’s contribution to national security. “The workforce possesses knowledge and expertise that increases the lethality of the joint services warfighter.”

Picatinny Arsenal was designated the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition, providing products and services to all branches of the U.S. military.

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Exchange program with Australia focuses on U.S. Army’s chemical protection

Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program participant Steve Carrig and co-worker Julia Freeman operate Chemical Articulated Test Manikin, known as CARTMAN, in the Australian Defense Science and Technology Office's Environmental Test Facility in Melbourne, Australia.

Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program participant Steve Carrig and co-worker Julia Freeman operate Chemical Articulated Test Manikin, known as CARTMAN, in the Australian Defense Science and Technology Office’s Environmental Test Facility in Melbourne, Australia.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Sept. 20, 2013) — Spending two years immersed in the Australian defense science and technology community provided new perspectives for a U.S. Army engineer.

Steve Carrig said his work with the Australian military allowed tremendous access to end users — Soldiers — because of the country’s smaller size.

“Having the chance to work with Soldiers on a more routine basis gives you a sense of who you’re working for,” said Carrig, who participated in the Army’s Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program from July 2011 to June 2013 at the Defense Science and Technology Office. “Having spent two years in a more closely knit environment really drove it home.

“That’s something that I won’t forget. Even if I’m sitting here in an office every day, managing things from afar, it reminds me that’s what I’m doing.”

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Army’s manufacturing improvements yield lighter body armor

Dr. Shawn Walsh (left), Agile Manufacturing Technology team leader at Army Research Laboratory, and Mike Thompson, an ARL contractor technician, unfurl a lightweight ballistic material for integration into body-armor processes at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Aug. 14, 2013.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Aug. 28, 2013) — Soldiers facing rugged terrain and extreme temperatures are continually searching for ways to reduce the weight of their gear.

In a search for solutions to this persistent issue, U.S. Army scientists and engineers have preliminarily demonstrated body armor that is 10 percent lighter through new manufacturing processes.

The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, known as RDECOM, along with its industry partners, has leveraged the Army’s Manufacturing Technology Program to spur the Advanced Body Armor Project.

 Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/D3Zd

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RDECOM Reservists address technology gaps at Ulchi Freedom Guardian

Officers support the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command during Ulchi Freedom Guardian 2012 at Camp Walker in Taegu, South Korea, in August 2012. From left: Lt. Col. Ted Ashford, U.S. Forces Korea science advisor; Lt. Col. Alan Samuels, Army Reserve Sustainment Command, Detachment 8;  Lt. Col. Anthony Lee, Army Reserve Sustainment Command, Detachment 8; and Capt. Scott Christensen, Army Reserve Sustainment Command, Detachment 8.

Officers support the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command during Ulchi Freedom Guardian 2012 at Camp Walker in Taegu, South Korea, in August 2012. From left: Lt. Col. Ted Ashford, U.S. Forces Korea science advisor; Lt. Col. Alan Samuels, Army Reserve Sustainment Command, Detachment 8; Lt. Col. Anthony Lee, Army Reserve Sustainment Command, Detachment 8; and Capt. Scott Christensen, Army Reserve Sustainment Command, Detachment 8.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — U.S. Army Reserve officers are serving a key role in identifying and addressing science and technology needs during a major U.S. Army exercise in the Pacific.

Col. John Olson is leading four officers from the Army Reserve Sustainment Command, Detachment 8, who will deploy to South Korea in August for Ulchi Freedom Guardian 2013.

The team interacts with Soldiers to better understand how Army scientists and engineers can improve capabilities on the peninsula, Olson said.

“These are real-world shortfalls. It’s part of a real-world war plan,” said Olson, who also participated in UFG 2011. “If we don’t begin to address this now, we may not be able to address these issues when a war starts.

“They understand there are important capability gaps that we can begin addressing now prior to actually needing them.”

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http://go.usa.gov/jdBT

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U.S. Army aids France with RPG-defense test data

French Soldiers patrol in a VBCI infantry fighting vehicle equipped with a legacy rocket-propelled grenade defense system. Fighting in Mali spurred the need for increased capabilities to protect French soldiers, and the U.S. Army has transferred technical test data on a new rocket-propelled grenade defense system, Q-Nets II, through an international agreement.

French Soldiers patrol in a VBCI infantry fighting vehicle equipped with a legacy rocket-propelled grenade defense system. Fighting in Mali spurred the need for increased capabilities to protect French soldiers, and the U.S. Army has transferred technical test data on a new rocket-propelled grenade defense system, Q-Nets II, through an international agreement.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. – The U.S. Army has transferred to France technical test data on a rocket-propelled grenade defense system that is vital to its military operations in Mali, officials announced.

The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, known as RDECOM, through its International Technology Center-France, helped to facilitate the exchange between the allies, said Lt. Col. Robert Willis, who led the project for RDECOM.

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http://go.usa.gov/jaa4

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Conformal battery unburdens Army’s networked Soldiers

 

The Conformal Wearable Battery, which is shown being placed into a tactical vest, is flexible and conforms to the body. It provides more power, reduces the need for battery re-charging and spares, and serves as a single source of power for all worn electronic devices.

The Conformal Wearable Battery, which is shown being placed into a tactical vest, is flexible and conforms to the body. It provides more power, reduces the need for battery re-charging and spares, and serves as a single source of power for all worn electronic devices.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army is developing a battery to improve Soldiers’ agility on the battlefield while meeting the demands of an increased power burden stemming from new networked electronic devices.

The Conformal Wearable Battery is flexible and integrates into a Soldier’s body armor. It conforms to the body, which Army officials say is a significant upgrade to traditional batteries that are rectangular and bulky.

The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command and Program Executive Office Soldier have partnered to fulfill the requirements of today’s networked Soldier with the CWB.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/j4yw

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Army leads nation in push to digital manufacturing

 ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The Obama administration has chosen the U.S. Army to launch an institute with a goal to spur innovation in digital manufacturing, officials announced recently.

The Army is enlisting its Manufacturing Technology Program, commonly known as ManTech, to lead the establishment of the Digital Manufacturing and Design Innovation Institute, said Andy Davis, ManTech program manager within the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command.

“This is an RDECOM-led effort. This is an opportunity for the command to drive this area forward,” Davis said.

RDECOM manages ManTech on behalf of the deputy assistant secretary of the Army for Research and Technology, which has overall responsibility for the Army’s program.

Dr. Greg Harris, with RDECOM’s Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center at Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the DMDI Institute program manager for Army. He is leading the effort, with participation from the Air Force, Navy and nine other federal government agencies.

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http://go.usa.gov/jqJF

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Engineers quickly return Kiowa to flight in Afghanistan

An OH-58D Kiowa helicopter sits at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, in this Army file photo. The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, or RFAST-C, reverse engineered and fabricated a Kiowa helicopter's fuselage bracket to return it to flight status.

An OH-58D Kiowa helicopter sits at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, in this Army file photo. The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, or RFAST-C, reverse engineered and fabricated a Kiowa helicopter’s fuselage bracket to return it to flight status.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — When Soldiers needed to replicate a key part of an OH-58D Kiowa helicopter to return it to duty, they turned to the expertise of a deployed U.S. Army civilian engineering team.

After the helicopter’s fuselage bracket supporting the copilot’s seat sustained damage from incoming fire, the 1106th Theater Aviation Sustainment Maintenance Group Task Force 14 at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, sought a quick turn-around solution.

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http://go.usa.gov/bjWC

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RDECOM recognizes 2013 NCO of the Year competition winner

Staff Sgt. Joshua Menninger won the 2013 RDECOM Noncommissioned Officer of the Year competition.

Staff Sgt. Joshua Menninger won the 2013 RDECOM Noncommissioned Officer of the Year competition.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Staff Sgt. Joshua Menninger captured top honors May 23 after a week of competition that tested four noncommissioned officers’ physical abilities, endurance and technical expertise.

Menninger earned recognition as the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s NCO of the Year.

RDECOM Director Dale Ormond and Command Sgt. Maj. Lebert Beharie, RDECOM’s senior enlisted advisor, congratulated Menninger and presented him with an Army backpack, football jersey and coffee mug.

Ormond thanked the four NCOs for their effort during the four days of rigorous competition.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/bCux

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Shoulder-to-shoulder: U.S., Filipino Soldiers train to purify water

Jim Ivey (center), a contractor with the U.S. Army Rapid Equipping Force, trains Soldiers on the Aspen 2000 water-purification system at Fort Magsaysay, Philippines, April 2.

Jim Ivey (center), a contractor with the U.S. Army Rapid Equipping Force, trains Soldiers on the Aspen 2000 water-purification system at Fort Magsaysay, Philippines, April 2.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — A team of U.S. Army Soldiers and civilians helped the Filipino people purify more than 14,000 gallons of water during a joint military exercise in April.

The water-purification project, part of the Balikatan 2013 Exercise, demonstrates the U.S. military’s significant commitment to stand “shoulder-to-shoulder” during military operations as well as humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions in the Pacific region, said Jim Muldoon, the science advisor assigned to U.S. Army Pacific at Fort Shafter, Hawaii.

“When an HA/DR event occurs, the military is typically the one that has the transportation, equipment and personnel that can take anything, anywhere, anytime,” Muldoon said. “Water is an invaluable resource, and you have to secure that from friend, foe and even nature itself.”

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/TJTw

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RDECOM shows off latest Army technology at Armed Forces Day

Leroy Stitz (left), an engineering assistant with RDECOM's Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, explains advancements in the Army's protective masks to students during Armed Forces Day May 15 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

Leroy Stitz (left), an engineering assistant with RDECOM’s Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, explains advancements in the Army’s protective masks to students during Armed Forces Day May 15 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Local students, military veterans and APG community members inspected and explored the Army’s latest advancements in protective masks, body armor, ballistics protection and renewable energy at Armed Forces Day May 15.

Scientists and engineers of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command displayed their work to unburden, empower and protect Soldiers at the APG-North Recreation Center.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/TzRH

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Army scientist discusses developing Soldier solutions ‘at the speed of war’

Mike Anthony (center), who recently completed a six-month deployment in which he served as director of the RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, talks with RFAST-C engineer Nick Merrill (left) and RFAST-C engineering technician Courtney Johnson, about the design of a modified "batwing" command wire detection hook for use with robots at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, April 25, 2013.

Mike Anthony (center), who recently completed a six-month deployment in which he served as director of the RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, talks with RFAST-C engineer Nick Merrill (left) and RFAST-C engineering technician Courtney Johnson, about the design of a modified “batwing” command wire detection hook for use with robots at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, April 25, 2013.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (June 12, 2013) — U.S. Army civilian engineers and engineering technicians have deployed to Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, for the past two years to develop field-expedient solutions for Soldiers.

They comprise the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, or RFAST-C, a forward-deployed prototype integration facility and Energy Initiative Proving Ground.

Mike Anthony recently completed a six-month deployment in which he served as RFAST-C director. He returns to his job as the chief of the Mission Command Capabilities Division at RDECOM’s Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center.

In an interview with the RDECOM public affairs office, Anthony discussed how RFAST-C brings expertise of the command’s scientists and engineers directly to theater to empower, unburden and protect Soldiers.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/b9Zh

 

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Picatinny engineers help West Point cadets patent their inventions

This man wants to help you patent your invention.

This man wants to help you patent your invention.

WEST POINT, N.Y. — Two West Point cadets invent something suspiciously similar to Batman’s grappling hook gun. Picatinny engineers rush to help cadets secure patents ahead of Wayne Enterprises.

Click here to read more.

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Digital howitzer fielded by 82nd Airborne Division

Digital howitzer still requires some manual work to achieve maximum utility.

Digital howitzer still requires some manual work to achieve maximum utility.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — The digital M119A3 105 mm howitzer was fielded by Soldiers of the 82nd Airborne Division. It was a PEO Ammunition project, but ARDEC helped out too.

Click here to read more.

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