Posts Tagged science

ARL, University partnerships

Bringing together research and development talent to improve the ability of the Army’s Future Force

By Jenna Brady, ARL Public Affairs

To develop revolutionary capabilities for Soldiers on the battlefield, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory brings together world-class research and development talent by leveraging the vast intellectual capital of the nation’s universities.

The lab makes this possible through programs and alliances including University Affiliated Research Centers, Collaborative Technology Alliances and Collaborative Research Alliances.

UARCs are university-led collaborations among universities, industry and Army laboratories that conduct basic, applied and technology demonstration research.

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U.S. Army, Australian leaders talk research, development cooperation

Dale A. Ormond (right), director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, discusses his organization with Dr. Alex Zelinsky, Australia’s chief defense scientist, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Jan. 27.

Dale A. Ormond (right), director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, discusses his organization with Dr. Alex Zelinsky, Australia’s chief defense scientist, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Jan. 27.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Jan. 28, 2014) — Australia’s chief defense scientist met with U.S. Army leaders Jan. 27 to explore opportunities for research and development partnerships.

The U.S. Army’s engagement with foreign partners in fostering science and engineering is essential to ensuring that Soldiers, as well as American allies, have access to the world’s best technology, said Dale A. Ormond, director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command.

“We are trying to expand our international outreach,” Ormond said. “Seventy percent of the money spent worldwide on science and technology is outside the U.S. There are great scientists and engineers everywhere. [It's important to] go find out who they are and work with them.”

Read more: http://go.usa.gov/BC6w

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Army program secures critical component for artillery, mortar ammunition

Soldiers assigned to Bulldog Battery, Field Artillery Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment load a M777A2 Howitzer during 2CR's Maneuver Rehearsal Exercise at Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany, Feb. 13, 2013. The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition.

Soldiers assigned to Bulldog Battery, Field Artillery Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment load a M777A2 Howitzer during 2CR’s Maneuver Rehearsal Exercise at Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany, Feb. 13, 2013. The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition, officials said.

Because of changes in the global cotton industry, the United States no longer has a domestic source of quality raw material for manufacturing nitrocellulose for combustible cartridge cases that are used extensively by the military. A domestic source is necessary to ensure a sufficient supply of quality cartridge cases, which is vital to maintaining readiness of the armed forces, according to Army experts.

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http://go.usa.gov/ZtYJ

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RDECOM discusses contracting opportunities at 2013 APBI

U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command representatives discuss contracting opportunities with visitors during the Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry conference at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Dec. 4.

U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command representatives discuss contracting opportunities with visitors during the Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry conference at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Dec. 4.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Dec. 5, 2013) — The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command presented upcoming contracts Dec. 4 during APG’s second annual Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry conference.

Mary Miller, deputy assistant secretary of the Army for Research and Technology, discussed the current state and the future of Army science and technology during her keynote speech at the APG Post Theater. She emphasized that the research and development community will serve a key role in shaping the Army’s future after 12 years of war.

“It’s important to understand the role of science and technology and the balance we have to strike. Our responsibility is to build the Army of the future, but we still need to take care of the Army that we currently have,” Miller said. “Our balance has been changing as circumstances dictate. In the last decade of war, we have spent a lot of our time and thought equity helping the current force through urgent requirements and needs coming out of theater.

“We determined how to fix those problems that Soldiers have and give them critical solutions. As we’re coming out of war, we’re seeing the need to get back to our roots and look to the Army of the future.”

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RDECOM demonstrates advances in Army power, energy at Pentagon

Katherine Hammack (left), assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, talks with Robert Berlin, a mechanical engineer with RDECOM's Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, in the Pentagon Courtyard Nov. 14.

Katherine Hammack (left), assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, talks with Robert Berlin, a mechanical engineer with RDECOM’s Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, in the Pentagon Courtyard Nov. 14.

WASHINGTON (Nov. 14, 2013) — The U.S. Army showcased how its research and engineering centers are enabling advances in operational energy for Soldiers Nov. 14 at the Pentagon.

Subject matter experts from across the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command discussed their work in technologies that included Soldier-borne electronics, ground-vehicle fuel efficiency and sustainable base camps.

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http://go.usa.gov/WPam

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Army bolsters nation’s cybersecurity through STEM outreach

During the "Network and Cyber" week, students first learned about the complexities of computer networks and the steps required for a single e-mail to be sent. In this activity, more than 30 students each represented a step that an e-mail must take to go from one network to another as they sent a message across the classroom. The Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences course took place in July 2013 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

During the “Network and Cyber” week, students first learned about the complexities of computer networks and the steps required for a single e-mail to be sent. In this activity, more than 30 students each represented a step that an e-mail must take to go from one network to another as they sent a message across the classroom. The Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences course took place in July 2013 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Computer networks face persistent cyber threats from the nation’s adversaries. The future defenders of cyberspace, America’s students, honed their skills this summer as they learned from U.S. Army scientists and engineers who are experts in the field.

Cybersecurity practitioners from across the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command joined forces to spark an interest and share their knowledge with high-school students as part of the Army Educational Outreach Program at APG.

Two RDECOM organizations — Army Research Laboratory and the Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center — partnered to develop and deliver two Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences cyber programs in July.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/WrFC

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‘Greening’ brings fresh perspectives for Army scientists, engineers

J.J. Kowal (left) and Walt Rada sit inside a LUH-72 Lakota at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Sept. 25.

J.J. Kowal (left) and Walt Rada sit inside a LUH-72 Lakota at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Sept. 25.

GUNPOWDER MILITARY RESERVATION, Md. — Thirty U.S. Army civilians now have a greater appreciation and understanding of the rigors and challenges associated with Soldier tasks.

Five days of intense training provided first-hand experience of the technical and physical demands on Soldiers.

Maj. Shane Sims, a military deputy at the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s communications and electronics center, led a Greening Course for the civilians from Aberdeen Proving Ground. One of his goals was for participants to think like Soldiers during the training rotations.

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http://go.usa.gov/DtAj

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Army scientist advances biometrics through UK exchange program

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, participated in the Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program from August 2011 to July 2013. He worked at the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory's Sensors and Countermeasures Department.

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, participated in the Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program from August 2011 to July 2013. He worked at the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory’s Sensors and Countermeasures Department.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Oct. 23, 2013) — British and U.S. Army researchers are partnering to enhance biometric and surveillance capabilities as the result of an exchange program between the countries.

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, focused on advancing facial-recognition technologies during his two-year assignment in the United Kingdom.

“How far can we look and see who someone is? How can we help our Soldiers see better and farther?” said Leonard, who was assigned to the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory in Salisbury.

Leonard said he wanted to better understand how different countries approach similar scientific topics. When the DSTL chief executive visited Leonard’s organization to talk about possible collaborations, an area of mutual interest was biometrics. The discussions piqued Leonard’s interest.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/W3kG

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Exchange program with Australia focuses on U.S. Army’s chemical protection

Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program participant Steve Carrig and co-worker Julia Freeman operate Chemical Articulated Test Manikin, known as CARTMAN, in the Australian Defense Science and Technology Office's Environmental Test Facility in Melbourne, Australia.

Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program participant Steve Carrig and co-worker Julia Freeman operate Chemical Articulated Test Manikin, known as CARTMAN, in the Australian Defense Science and Technology Office’s Environmental Test Facility in Melbourne, Australia.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Sept. 20, 2013) — Spending two years immersed in the Australian defense science and technology community provided new perspectives for a U.S. Army engineer.

Steve Carrig said his work with the Australian military allowed tremendous access to end users — Soldiers — because of the country’s smaller size.

“Having the chance to work with Soldiers on a more routine basis gives you a sense of who you’re working for,” said Carrig, who participated in the Army’s Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program from July 2011 to June 2013 at the Defense Science and Technology Office. “Having spent two years in a more closely knit environment really drove it home.

“That’s something that I won’t forget. Even if I’m sitting here in an office every day, managing things from afar, it reminds me that’s what I’m doing.”

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Army’s manufacturing improvements yield lighter body armor

Dr. Shawn Walsh (left), Agile Manufacturing Technology team leader at Army Research Laboratory, and Mike Thompson, an ARL contractor technician, unfurl a lightweight ballistic material for integration into body-armor processes at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Aug. 14, 2013.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Aug. 28, 2013) — Soldiers facing rugged terrain and extreme temperatures are continually searching for ways to reduce the weight of their gear.

In a search for solutions to this persistent issue, U.S. Army scientists and engineers have preliminarily demonstrated body armor that is 10 percent lighter through new manufacturing processes.

The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, known as RDECOM, along with its industry partners, has leveraged the Army’s Manufacturing Technology Program to spur the Advanced Body Armor Project.

 Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/D3Zd

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New guided munition sensors are greater than sum of their parts

A sensor array next to a quarter to reflect relative size.

A sensor array next to a quarter to reflect relative size.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (September 18, 2013) — When preparing to face a more talented opponent, coaches tell their players that the path to victory is pulling together as a team to somehow obtain more than a sum of each player’s talents.

For Army scientists, that same concept may have been expressed in the form of an advanced algorithm that gets optimum performance from a team of inertial sensors, which could be used to guide cannon-fired munitions to a target with near precision, even without Global Positioning Satellite navigation.

In addition to high performance, a big advantage to the team of sensors is greatly reduced cost.

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Former “Cheers” actor visits Picatinny to learn military manufacturing techniques

During a tour of Picatinny Sept. 4, James Zunino (right), Picatinny Materials Engineer, shows actor John Ratzenberger a modular tool that can be added onto the Multi-Axis Modular Manufacturing Platform for additive manufacturing. Different tools allow the machine to perform different manufacturing techniques. Photo Credit: Erin Usawicz

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Actor John Ratzenberger, best known for his iconic role as postal worker Cliff Clavin on the TV show “Cheers,” is promoting manufacturing in the U.S.

His interest led him to visit Picatinny Arsenal Sept. 4, where he saw first-hand a number of the advanced manufacturing techniques the installation uses to equip the nation’s warfighters.

Ratzenberger’s interest in manufacturing previously inspired him to produce and host shows like “Made in America,” a Travel Channel TV production highlighting manufacturing companies that produce interesting products across the nation.

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High school graduate gets personal tour of Picatinny labs

This high school graduate (right) impressed us so much with his research on nanotechnology that he got invited for a personal tour of our nanotechnology labs.

This high school graduate (right) impressed us so much with his research on nanotechnology that he got invited for a personal tour of our nanotechnology labs.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — So there was this high school student who just graduated this year who presented a paper at the Monmouth Junior Science Symposium that was so thorough with his independent research on nanotechnology that we just had to get him a personal invite to come and tour our labs. Seriously exciting.

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Picatinny cultivates today’s teacher’s, tomorrow’s innovators

So much learning going on here.

So much learning going on here.


PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Why stop at just getting students more interested in science, technology, engineering and mathematics when we can get local teachers involved and excited as well? Well that’s just what we did and we’re quite pleased with the results.

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Picatinny to grant doctoral degrees

Soon we'll have people who have earned their PhD from Picatinny Arsenal.

Soon we’ll have people who have earned their PhD from Picatinny Arsenal.


PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Sure we’re already the Joint Center of Excellence for Armaments and Munitions. Now we’ll also be known as a degree granting institution. Who will be the first to earn their PhD from Picatinny Arsenal?

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RDECOM Reservists address technology gaps at Ulchi Freedom Guardian

Officers support the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command during Ulchi Freedom Guardian 2012 at Camp Walker in Taegu, South Korea, in August 2012. From left: Lt. Col. Ted Ashford, U.S. Forces Korea science advisor; Lt. Col. Alan Samuels, Army Reserve Sustainment Command, Detachment 8;  Lt. Col. Anthony Lee, Army Reserve Sustainment Command, Detachment 8; and Capt. Scott Christensen, Army Reserve Sustainment Command, Detachment 8.

Officers support the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command during Ulchi Freedom Guardian 2012 at Camp Walker in Taegu, South Korea, in August 2012. From left: Lt. Col. Ted Ashford, U.S. Forces Korea science advisor; Lt. Col. Alan Samuels, Army Reserve Sustainment Command, Detachment 8; Lt. Col. Anthony Lee, Army Reserve Sustainment Command, Detachment 8; and Capt. Scott Christensen, Army Reserve Sustainment Command, Detachment 8.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — U.S. Army Reserve officers are serving a key role in identifying and addressing science and technology needs during a major U.S. Army exercise in the Pacific.

Col. John Olson is leading four officers from the Army Reserve Sustainment Command, Detachment 8, who will deploy to South Korea in August for Ulchi Freedom Guardian 2013.

The team interacts with Soldiers to better understand how Army scientists and engineers can improve capabilities on the peninsula, Olson said.

“These are real-world shortfalls. It’s part of a real-world war plan,” said Olson, who also participated in UFG 2011. “If we don’t begin to address this now, we may not be able to address these issues when a war starts.

“They understand there are important capability gaps that we can begin addressing now prior to actually needing them.”

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/jdBT

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Picatinny and NJIT invite middle school girls to get excited about science and technology

Njit_seal

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Picatinny Arsenal and the New Jersey Institute of Technology coordinated a visit here for middle school girls to get them excited about careers in science and technology. How’d it go? You’ll have to find out yourself.

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APG unveils center for STEM, education outreach

U.S. Army officials prepare to cut the ribbon of the Aberdeen Proving Ground STEM and Education Outreach Center July 30. From left: Col. Gregory McClinton, APG Garrison commander; Robert Carter, executive technical director of the Army Test and Evaluation Command; Dr. Thomas Russell, director of the Army Research Laboratory; Maj. Gen. Robert Ferrell, commanding general of the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command and APG senior commander; Nicole Racine, a University of Maryland-Baltimore County sophomore; Dale Ormond, director of the Army Research, Development and Engineering Command; Jeffrey Singleton, director of basic research, laboratory management and educational outreach for the assistant secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology; Suzanne Milchling, program integration director of the Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center; and Robert Zanzalari, associate director of the Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center.

 ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Aspiring scientists and engineers are now exploring their future careers at a unified APG facility dedicated to education outreach.

APG ushered in a new era of partnerships in science, technology, engineering and mathematics for northeast Maryland with a ribbon-cutting ceremony July 30.

The APG STEM and Education Outreach Center brings tenant organizations together to pool resources that will enhance students’ experiences in scientific and engineering disciplines. The facility accommodates up to 200 students.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/jnM4

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U.S. Army aids France with RPG-defense test data

French Soldiers patrol in a VBCI infantry fighting vehicle equipped with a legacy rocket-propelled grenade defense system. Fighting in Mali spurred the need for increased capabilities to protect French soldiers, and the U.S. Army has transferred technical test data on a new rocket-propelled grenade defense system, Q-Nets II, through an international agreement.

French Soldiers patrol in a VBCI infantry fighting vehicle equipped with a legacy rocket-propelled grenade defense system. Fighting in Mali spurred the need for increased capabilities to protect French soldiers, and the U.S. Army has transferred technical test data on a new rocket-propelled grenade defense system, Q-Nets II, through an international agreement.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. – The U.S. Army has transferred to France technical test data on a rocket-propelled grenade defense system that is vital to its military operations in Mali, officials announced.

The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, known as RDECOM, through its International Technology Center-France, helped to facilitate the exchange between the allies, said Lt. Col. Robert Willis, who led the project for RDECOM.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/jaa4

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Conformal battery unburdens Army’s networked Soldiers

 

The Conformal Wearable Battery, which is shown being placed into a tactical vest, is flexible and conforms to the body. It provides more power, reduces the need for battery re-charging and spares, and serves as a single source of power for all worn electronic devices.

The Conformal Wearable Battery, which is shown being placed into a tactical vest, is flexible and conforms to the body. It provides more power, reduces the need for battery re-charging and spares, and serves as a single source of power for all worn electronic devices.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army is developing a battery to improve Soldiers’ agility on the battlefield while meeting the demands of an increased power burden stemming from new networked electronic devices.

The Conformal Wearable Battery is flexible and integrates into a Soldier’s body armor. It conforms to the body, which Army officials say is a significant upgrade to traditional batteries that are rectangular and bulky.

The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command and Program Executive Office Soldier have partnered to fulfill the requirements of today’s networked Soldier with the CWB.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/j4yw

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