Tag Archives: Picatinny Arsenal

Armament engineers use ultrasound to develop safer, better ordnance

Viral Panchal and Rajen Patel, engineers at the U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center, display the pieces that make up the ultrasound technology for propellants. (U.S. Army photo by Todd Mozes)

By Lauren Poindexter and Ed Lopez, Picatinny Arsenal Public Affairs

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (Oct. 7, 2015) — Engineers are using ultrasound technology to more easily find defects during the manufacture of ordnance as a way to lower costs, produce more effective ordnance and provide an added measure of safety for Soldiers in the field.

At the U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center, or ARDEC, engineers want to remove the “black box” that surrounds the production of energetic materials. In the context of defense research, “energetics” is a short-hand term for materials such as explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics.

“We have this black box and it’s currently hard to see inside with the technology that is available,” said chemical engineer Viral Panchal.

“Ultrasound gives us the ability to open up the box, leading to more effective research, development and manufacturing,” Panchal added.

ARDEC engineers have been working with Wes Cobb at the University of Denver, who has decades of experience developing ultrasound technology for the food, oil and medical industries.

Army research center graduates first armament graduate students

Hats off to the first graduates of the Armament Graduate School at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. The first class of the Armament Graduate School, part of the U.S. Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center graduates Sept. 10 at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. Joining the students (center left ) Mr. John F. Hedderich III, director of ARDEC and (center right) Maj. Gen. John F. Wharton, Commanding General, U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command. (U.S. Army photo by Erin Usawicz)

Hats off to the first graduates of the Armament Graduate School at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. The first class of the Armament Graduate School, part of the U.S. Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center graduates Sept. 10 at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. Joining the students (center left ) Mr. John F. Hedderich III, director of ARDEC and (center right) Maj. Gen. John F. Wharton, Commanding General, U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command. (U.S. Army photo by Erin Usawicz)


By Audra Calloway, Picatinny Arsenal Public Affairs

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (Sept. 10, 2015) — A new chapter in developing and educating world-class armament engineers and scientists took place here Sept. 10th when eight students were recognized during the Armament Graduate School’s first commencement ceremony.

The school is unique: No other graduate school science and engineering curriculum is known to exist specifically to address armaments. Armament Graduate School course titles include esoteric topics such as “Gun-Hardened Electronics and Components,” “Warheads & Fuzing,” and “Lethality Analysis and War Gaming.”

The Armament Graduate School is part of the U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center, or ARDEC at Picatinny, whose mission is to empower, unburden, and protect the Warfighter by providing superior armaments solutions that dominate the battlefield. The center reports to the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, or RDECOM.

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Army program secures critical component for artillery, mortar ammunition

Soldiers assigned to Bulldog Battery, Field Artillery Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment load a M777A2 Howitzer during 2CR's Maneuver Rehearsal Exercise at Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany, Feb. 13, 2013. The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition.

Soldiers assigned to Bulldog Battery, Field Artillery Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment load a M777A2 Howitzer during 2CR’s Maneuver Rehearsal Exercise at Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany, Feb. 13, 2013. The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition, officials said.

Because of changes in the global cotton industry, the United States no longer has a domestic source of quality raw material for manufacturing nitrocellulose for combustible cartridge cases that are used extensively by the military. A domestic source is necessary to ensure a sufficient supply of quality cartridge cases, which is vital to maintaining readiness of the armed forces, according to Army experts.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/ZtYJ

Secretary of the Army visits Picatinny, assesses sequestration impact on R&D

Secretary of the Army John McHugh looks at a technology display during a visit to Picatinny Arsenal, N.J. McHugh visited the New Jersey military installation, which has been designated the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition, Sept. 26, 2013, to assess the effect of sequestration on the installation's efforts in research, development, acquisition and lifecycle management of weapon systems and ammunition. (U.S. Army photo by Erin Usawicz)

Secretary of the Army John McHugh looks at a technology display during a visit to Picatinny Arsenal, N.J. McHugh visited the New Jersey military installation, which has been designated the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition, Sept. 26, 2013, to assess the effect of sequestration on the installation’s efforts in research, development, acquisition and lifecycle management of weapon systems and ammunition. (U.S. Army photo by Erin Usawicz)

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (Sept. 26, 2013) — Secretary of the Army John McHugh was at the Picatinny Arsenal Thursday, to assess the effect of sequestration on the installation’s efforts in research, development, acquisition and lifecycle management of weapon systems and ammunition.

“This is a unique facility with a critically important mission; there really is no other government or industry counterpart to Picatinny,” McHugh said, underscoring the arsenal’s contribution to national security. “The workforce possesses knowledge and expertise that increases the lethality of the joint services warfighter.”

Picatinny Arsenal was designated the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition, providing products and services to all branches of the U.S. military.

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Picatinny advances ‘computer chip of the future’

The Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) at Picatinny recently won the 2013 Federal Laboratory Consortium Northeast Region Award for its excellence in technology transfer as demonstrated by its HyperX chip technology.

The Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center at Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., recently won the 2013 Federal Laboratory Consortium Northeast Region Award for its excellence in technology transfer as demonstrated by its HyperX chip technology.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (September 25, 2013) — As the power and popularity of mobile devices grows, so does the desire for faster data processing without consuming much power.

The HyperX computer chip technology, under development by researchers at Picatinny Arsenal holds the promise to deliver that goal for both commercial and military users.

The small, HyperX chip was intentionally designed to meet high volume, low power processing requirements.

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New guided munition sensors are greater than sum of their parts

A sensor array next to a quarter to reflect relative size.

A sensor array next to a quarter to reflect relative size.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (September 18, 2013) — When preparing to face a more talented opponent, coaches tell their players that the path to victory is pulling together as a team to somehow obtain more than a sum of each player’s talents.

For Army scientists, that same concept may have been expressed in the form of an advanced algorithm that gets optimum performance from a team of inertial sensors, which could be used to guide cannon-fired munitions to a target with near precision, even without Global Positioning Satellite navigation.

In addition to high performance, a big advantage to the team of sensors is greatly reduced cost.

Click here to read more.

Former “Cheers” actor visits Picatinny to learn military manufacturing techniques

During a tour of Picatinny Sept. 4, James Zunino (right), Picatinny Materials Engineer, shows actor John Ratzenberger a modular tool that can be added onto the Multi-Axis Modular Manufacturing Platform for additive manufacturing. Different tools allow the machine to perform different manufacturing techniques. Photo Credit: Erin Usawicz

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Actor John Ratzenberger, best known for his iconic role as postal worker Cliff Clavin on the TV show “Cheers,” is promoting manufacturing in the U.S.

His interest led him to visit Picatinny Arsenal Sept. 4, where he saw first-hand a number of the advanced manufacturing techniques the installation uses to equip the nation’s warfighters.

Ratzenberger’s interest in manufacturing previously inspired him to produce and host shows like “Made in America,” a Travel Channel TV production highlighting manufacturing companies that produce interesting products across the nation.

Click here to read more.

Picatinny to remove tons of toxins from lethal rounds

Belts of .50 caliber ammunition await U.S. Soldiers with the 6th Engineer Battalion, 2nd Engineer Brigade, as they prepare to conduct qualifications on the M2 .50 caliber machine gun at a range in Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Aug. 14, 2012. The Pyrotechnics Division of the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center, at Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., is developing an alternate formula for certain armor-piercing incendiary projectiles that is friendlier to the environment than the chemicals currently being used.

Belts of .50 caliber ammunition await U.S. Soldiers with the 6th Engineer Battalion, 2nd Engineer Brigade, as they prepare to conduct qualifications on the M2 .50 caliber machine gun at a range in Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Aug. 14, 2012. Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (August 22, 2013) — An enemy convoy transporting a supply of fuel rumbles across the desert floor, an ideal target for armor-piercing incendiary projectiles.

These projectiles are most useful for “after-armor effects,” such as an incandescent flash immediately after penetrating a hard target. The resulting plume may be useful for devastating any fuel-storage facilities by igniting the fuel vapors.

The Army uses a formulation called IM-28 that is charged into certain armor-piercing incendiary projectiles, which can be fired from such weapons as the M2, M3, and M85 machine guns.

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High school graduate gets personal tour of Picatinny labs

This high school graduate (right) impressed us so much with his research on nanotechnology that he got invited for a personal tour of our nanotechnology labs.

This high school graduate (right) impressed us so much with his research on nanotechnology that he got invited for a personal tour of our nanotechnology labs.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — So there was this high school student who just graduated this year who presented a paper at the Monmouth Junior Science Symposium that was so thorough with his independent research on nanotechnology that we just had to get him a personal invite to come and tour our labs. Seriously exciting.

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Picatinny cultivates today’s teacher’s, tomorrow’s innovators

So much learning going on here.

So much learning going on here.


PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Why stop at just getting students more interested in science, technology, engineering and mathematics when we can get local teachers involved and excited as well? Well that’s just what we did and we’re quite pleased with the results.

Click here to read more.

Picatinny to grant doctoral degrees

Soon we'll have people who have earned their PhD from Picatinny Arsenal.

Soon we’ll have people who have earned their PhD from Picatinny Arsenal.


PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Sure we’re already the Joint Center of Excellence for Armaments and Munitions. Now we’ll also be known as a degree granting institution. Who will be the first to earn their PhD from Picatinny Arsenal?

Click here to read more.

Picatinny and NJIT invite middle school girls to get excited about science and technology

Njit_seal

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Picatinny Arsenal and the New Jersey Institute of Technology coordinated a visit here for middle school girls to get them excited about careers in science and technology. How’d it go? You’ll have to find out yourself.

Click here to read more.

External validation helps us realize how good we really are

Yessss.

Yessss.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — The Armament Software Engineering Center at the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center here was recently recognized as one of the top organizations within the federal government by earning a CMMI-DEV Maturity Level 5 distinction. We are the only U.S. Federal Government organization to currently hold that. To find out more about what a big deal that is, click here to read the whole story.

Picatinny engineers help West Point cadets patent their inventions

This man wants to help you patent your invention.

This man wants to help you patent your invention.

WEST POINT, N.Y. — Two West Point cadets invent something suspiciously similar to Batman’s grappling hook gun. Picatinny engineers rush to help cadets secure patents ahead of Wayne Enterprises.

Click here to read more.

Digital howitzer still requires some manual work to achieve maximum utility.

Digital howitzer fielded by 82nd Airborne Division

Digital howitzer still requires some manual work to achieve maximum utility.

Digital howitzer still requires some manual work to achieve maximum utility.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — The digital M119A3 105 mm howitzer was fielded by Soldiers of the 82nd Airborne Division. It was a PEO Ammunition project, but ARDEC helped out too.

Click here to read more.

RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, or RFAST-C, engineers and technicians discuss prototype integration facility capabilities with senior noncommissioned officers from the 18th Engineer Brigade at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, in June 2012.

Army team spans globe for science, technology solutions

RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, or RFAST-C, engineers and technicians discuss prototype integration facility capabilities with senior noncommissioned officers from the 18th Engineer Brigade at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, in June 2012.

RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, or RFAST-C, engineers and technicians discuss prototype integration facility capabilities with senior noncommissioned officers from the 18th Engineer Brigade at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, in June 2012.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — U.S. Army science advisors are embedded with major units around the world to speed technology solutions to Soldiers’ needs.

The Field Assistance in Science and Technology program’s 30 science advisors, both uniformed officers and Army civilians, provide a link between Soldiers and the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s thousands of subject matter experts.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/T9Gd

 

A 1st Battalion, 175th Infantry Soldier practices camouflage, cover and concealment with the fire-resistant ghillie suit during training at Fort A.P. Hill, Va., in November 2012. The fire-resistant ghillie suit was acquired for U.S. Army and Marine Corps snipers in record time through the Defense Acquisition Challenge Program.

Fire-resistant ghillie suit, enhanced rocket fuze win DoD awards

 

A 1st Battalion, 175th Infantry Soldier practices camouflage, cover and concealment with the fire-resistant ghillie suit during training at Fort A.P. Hill, Va., in November 2012. The fire-resistant ghillie suit was acquired for U.S. Army and Marine Corps snipers in record time through the Defense Acquisition Challenge Program.

A 1st Battalion, 175th Infantry Soldier practices camouflage, cover and concealment with the fire-resistant ghillie suit during training at Fort A.P. Hill, Va., in November 2012. The fire-resistant ghillie suit was acquired for U.S. Army and Marine Corps snipers in record time through the Defense Acquisition Challenge Program.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — U.S. Army program managers earned Department of Defense acquisition awards recently for rapidly fielding a fire-resistant ghillie suit and an enhanced fuze rocket warhead.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/2wtB

 

Girls, meet engineering.

Picatinny introduce girls to engineering

Girls, meet engineering.

Girls, meet engineering.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Local area high school students were invited to our “Introduce a Girl to Engineering” night. We like to think it went well.

Click here to read more.