Posts Tagged PEO Ammunition

Army program secures critical component for artillery, mortar ammunition

Soldiers assigned to Bulldog Battery, Field Artillery Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment load a M777A2 Howitzer during 2CR's Maneuver Rehearsal Exercise at Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany, Feb. 13, 2013. The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition.

Soldiers assigned to Bulldog Battery, Field Artillery Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment load a M777A2 Howitzer during 2CR’s Maneuver Rehearsal Exercise at Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany, Feb. 13, 2013. The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition, officials said.

Because of changes in the global cotton industry, the United States no longer has a domestic source of quality raw material for manufacturing nitrocellulose for combustible cartridge cases that are used extensively by the military. A domestic source is necessary to ensure a sufficient supply of quality cartridge cases, which is vital to maintaining readiness of the armed forces, according to Army experts.

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http://go.usa.gov/ZtYJ

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Secretary of the Army visits Picatinny, assesses sequestration impact on R&D

Secretary of the Army John McHugh looks at a technology display during a visit to Picatinny Arsenal, N.J. McHugh visited the New Jersey military installation, which has been designated the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition, Sept. 26, 2013, to assess the effect of sequestration on the installation's efforts in research, development, acquisition and lifecycle management of weapon systems and ammunition. (U.S. Army photo by Erin Usawicz)

Secretary of the Army John McHugh looks at a technology display during a visit to Picatinny Arsenal, N.J. McHugh visited the New Jersey military installation, which has been designated the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition, Sept. 26, 2013, to assess the effect of sequestration on the installation’s efforts in research, development, acquisition and lifecycle management of weapon systems and ammunition. (U.S. Army photo by Erin Usawicz)

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (Sept. 26, 2013) — Secretary of the Army John McHugh was at the Picatinny Arsenal Thursday, to assess the effect of sequestration on the installation’s efforts in research, development, acquisition and lifecycle management of weapon systems and ammunition.

“This is a unique facility with a critically important mission; there really is no other government or industry counterpart to Picatinny,” McHugh said, underscoring the arsenal’s contribution to national security. “The workforce possesses knowledge and expertise that increases the lethality of the joint services warfighter.”

Picatinny Arsenal was designated the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition, providing products and services to all branches of the U.S. military.

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Digital howitzer fielded by 82nd Airborne Division

Digital howitzer still requires some manual work to achieve maximum utility.

Digital howitzer still requires some manual work to achieve maximum utility.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — The digital M119A3 105 mm howitzer was fielded by Soldiers of the 82nd Airborne Division. It was a PEO Ammunition project, but ARDEC helped out too.

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Army ManTech Program bridges gap between lab and Soldier

Dr. Shawn Walsh (left), with Army Research Laboratory's Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, explains ARL's investments in lighter, more efficient ballistic materials and defeat mechanisms to Gen. Dennis Via (center), Army Materiel Command commanding general, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Dec. 3, 2012. ARL and Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center jointly executed an Army ManTech program to overcome the technology barriers associated with performing and rapid thermoforming of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene materials into complex shapes such as helmets.

Dr. Shawn Walsh (left), with Army Research Laboratory’s Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, explains ARL’s investments in lighter, more efficient ballistic materials and defeat mechanisms to Gen. Dennis Via (center), Army Materiel Command commanding general, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Dec. 3, 2012. ARL and Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center jointly executed an Army ManTech program to overcome the technology barriers associated with performing and rapid thermoforming of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene materials into complex shapes such as helmets.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Transitioning a technology prototype from an Army engineer’s laboratory to the Soldier on the ground is filled with potential obstacles.

To overcome challenges associated with manufacturing Soldiers’ equipment, from helicopters to helmets, the U.S. Army enlists the Manufacturing Technology Program, commonly known as ManTech.

Andy Davis, ManTech program manager with the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, said his team is focused on addressing issues in affordability and producibility.

“[Scientists and engineers] develop technologies in the labs. They can make one or two [prototypes] in the lab, but they can’t make them in quantity,” Davis said. “ManTech bridges that gap. In terms of the Warfighter impact, it helps get items more quickly to the [field].”

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http://go.usa.gov/4hPm

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Greater than the sum of its parts

Collectively, we’re the Lucius Fox for the U.S. Army.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Dale Ormond, director of RDECOM, stopped at Picatinny to deliver an important message. Click the link to find out what he had to say.

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Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, RELOAD!

Reload!

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Because once is never enough, we came up with a solution on what to do with old artillery shells. Click the link to find out where they all went.

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Army research centers partner for improved ammunition packaging

 

 U.S. Army research and development centers are collaborating to design new ammunition packaging that could yield significant cost savings and improve battlefield capability, officials said.

Two organizations within the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command — the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center and Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center — are developing a packaging system for 5.56-millimeter ammunition as an alternative to fabric bandoleers.

The new system is being developed for the Project Director Joint Services in support of the Program Manager for Maneuver Ammunition Systems. It could save considerable cost by using lightweight and inexpensive plastic packaging materials with a design that will allow for automated packing at the ammunition manufacturing plant, said Dan Klein, an engineer with ARDEC’s Packaging Division who serves as the program lead.

 To read more:

http://go.usa.gov/g3BC

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It’s like that Avatar movie

Motion-capture suits were worn to create avatars for the M777A2 trainer. No blue cat-people were rendered.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Like something out of a Hollywood sci-fi production, Soldiers and Marines donned motion-capture suits and underwent face scans to render computer avatars of themselves. But this was no movie set and there would be no red carpet premiere.

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Picatinny engineers get howitzers unstuck and back on TrAK

Soldiers of the 172nd Infantry Brigade in Afghanistan work at dislodging their M-777 155mm howitzer from a three-foot deep hole it dug after firing several projectiles. The huge weapon weighs 9,800 pounds and can launch projectiles more than 30 kilometers. picatinny engineers have developed a solution for Soldiers that makes the howitzer easier to maneuver. (Photo by Sgt. Ken Scar)

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — When Soldiers in Afghanistan move their M777A2 howitzers to adjust their aim, they can literally become “stuck in a rut” when the wheels get trapped in the sand and rocks.

To help alleviate this issue, engineers at Picatinny Arsenal have designed the Traverse Assist Kit (TrAK) to make the howitzer faster and easier to move.

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101st Airborne Soldiers help prepare for fielding of upgraded howitzer

Sgt. Jahrahrah Gousby (left) and Spc. Morris Morley were among members of the the 101st Airborne Division who tested the new digitized M119A2 howitzer technical manual during the second phase of the operator Logistics demonstration at Picatinny Arsenal.


PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Soldiers from the 101st Airborne Division recently helped Picatinny Arsenal employees complete the second of three logistics phases required before the digitized M119A2 howitzer can be fielded to troops.

“The upgraded digitized M119A2 will be equipped with a digital fire control system that integrates an inertial navigation system with global positioning system technology that will give the weapon the ability to self locate and accurately place rounds on target,” explained Deborah Le Vitin, Digitized M119A2 105mm Howitzer logistics manager.

Back in November, Soldiers from the 82nd Airborne Division completed the first phase of the logistics testing, the Operator Logistics Demonstration.

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Army undersecretary talks business

Undersecretary of the Army Joseph W. Westphal (center) tours a facility at Picatinny Arsenal accompanied by Brig. Gen. Jonathan A. Maddox (right), Program Executive Officer for Ammunition and Picatinny Arsenal senior commander. (Photo by Todd Mozes)

Picatinny Arsenal, N.J. – While the public may associate the U.S. Army with Soldiers and weapons on the battlefield, there is also an “institutional” Army that has functions similar to those of large corporations in the private sector, a top Army official told a business group here April 2.

Speaking before the Morristown Chamber of Commerce, Undersecretary of the Army Joseph W. Westphal said the institutional or “business side” of the Army was responsible for the training, recruiting, staffing, equipping and sustaining of the Army forces.

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M119A2 Howitzer upgrade provides quicker firepower

By Audra Calloway

PEO Ammunition employees, with help from the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC), recently shipped four M119A2s to various installations for safety testing.

Soldiers are one step closer to receiving a digitized M119A2 howitzer that will make it possible for them to start firing rounds and evade return fire quicker.

The M119A2 is a lightweight 105mm howitzer that provides suppressive and protective fires for Infantry Brigade Combat Teams.

PEO Ammunition employees, with help from the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC), recently shipped four M119A2s to various installations for safety testing.

The upgraded M119A2 will be equipped with a digital fire control system that includes an inertial navigation unit, guided-precision system technology and other features that will give the weapon the ability to determine its precise geographical location on its own.

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Howitzer program helps strengthen Afghan self defense

By Audra Calloway

An inspected D30 howitzer is loaded for delivery to Afghanistan.

Picatinny Arsenal is helping the Afghan National Army develop their indirect fire capability to bolster self-defense.

Picatinny, in conjunction with the Combined Security Transition Command-Afghanistan, will support the acquisition of 194 D30, 122mm Howitzers for the Afghan National Army.

In addition to supporting the acquisition of the howitzers, the Program Executive Office Ammunition, or PEO Ammo, has also helped establish a training and mentoring program at the Central Work Shop in Kabul, Afghanistan. At the CWS, mentors/instructors are teaching an Afghan work force how to properly overhaul, repair and maintain the weapons.

To accomplish this mission, PEO Ammo has enlisted the support of the Project Manager for Towed Artillery Systems, known as PM TAS, and subject matter experts in the areas of optical fire control, canon, quality assurance and weapon systems from the Armament Research Development & Engineering Center, or ARDEC.

To date, this team has successfully delivered 85 of the required 194 howitzers.

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New ammunition combines four artillery cartridges into one

By Audra Calloway
 

A new artillery round combines the capabilities of other current rounds, which is expected to reduce the logistics burden by 50 to 75 percent.

 
The Program Executive Office for Ammunition has started testing a new artillery round that will provide Soldier’s with superior performance as well as lighten the military logistics burden.

The 105mm M1130E1 High Explosive Pre-Formed Fragments, Base Bleed, or HE PFF BB round with the XM350 propelling charge, is a state-of-the-art cartridge that replaces four existing high- explosive projectiles and two propelling charges with a single round.

The M1130E1 is fired from the M119 howitzer and will be used against light to medium targets, such as personnel and trucks.

It provides increased combat effectiveness for all 105mm howitzer units, but will specifically aid the mission of the light forces operating in rugged terrain, such as Afghanistan.

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