AMC commander visits CERDEC sensors, power

Gen. Dennis L. Via, commanding general of the U.S. Army Materiel Command, sees a demonstration on ground combat sensor technologies during a visit to CERDEC Oct. 16. (U.S. Army photo by Julie Goldberg)

CERDEC Public Affairs

FORT BELVOIR, Va. (Oct. 19, 2015) — Gen. Dennis L. Via, commanding general of the U.S. Army Materiel Command, saw the latest in Army night-vision and power technologies for the Army of 2030 and beyond during a visit to the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, or CERDEC, Oct. 16, 2015.

Via received demonstrations that included the evolution of the thermal weapon sight; target handoff with coded spot tracker; third generation forward-looking infrared technologies; infrared cameras for future applications in heads up navigation, tracking and reporting; and multifunction video displays.

Via was pleased by the strides in technology that CERDEC is making to improve technologies and unburden the logistics load on the Soldier, he said. Continue reading

Night turns into day: Army researchers enable night lethality

In complete dark from significant standoff, Soldiers use medium wave infrared, or MWIR, technology to turn night into day. (U.S. Army photo)

In complete dark from significant standoff, Soldiers use medium wave infrared, or MWIR, technology to turn night into day. (U.S. Army photo)

By Kim Bell, CERDEC NVESD Public Affairs

In science fiction, technology problems are solved with the stroke of a writer’s pen. In reality, science and technology research takes time and a lot of effort.

“If you’ve seen the movie Predator, you’ve seen a perfect illustration of the process of lethality,” said Dr. Don Reago, director of the Night Vision Electronics Sensors Directorate of the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center at Fort Belvoir, Va. “First, you must identify your target and if in fact it is a target, then you can move in and eliminate the threat.”

In the movie, the predator identifies targets using thermal technology and deducing whether or not they are carrying weapons.

“If potential targets were unarmed they went unharmed, much like how our warfighters operate at present,” Reago said. “Today, the Army’s goal is to improve situational awareness for Soldiers, resulting in increased survivability, decreased civilian casualties and accurate lethality when necessary.”

At NVESD, Army researchers are developing sensors, like the thermal sensors from Predator, as well as image intensification.

Continue reading

3 new Picatinny munitions light up night sky for U.S. Warfighters

Infrared Illuminating ROUNDSPICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Soldiers now have capabilities to engage the enemy far more effectively during nighttime operations, following the recent full materiel release of three infrared illuminating rounds.

The term full materiel release signifies that the Army has rigorously tested and evaluated the item and determined it is completely safe, operationally suitable and logistically supportable for use by Soldiers.

The M1064 105mm Infrared Illuminating Cartridge; the M1066 155mm Infrared Illuminating Projectile; and the M992 40mm Infrared Illuminant Cartridge were approved for full materiel release via the Program Executive Office for Ammunition (PEO Ammo), headquartered at Picatinny.

Illuminating cartridges, or pyrotechnic flares, have been widely used by militaries for years, but they have previously only provided light in the visible spectrum, which the enemy can utilize as well. The Army’s new infrared illuminating cartridges/projectiles produce infrared light that is invisible to the naked eye, but is clearly visible through night vision devices which U.S. Soldiers use in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Following the full materiel release of these three additional munitions, the Army now has visible light and infrared capability for all calibers of mortars, artillery and 40mm.

READ MORE

Researchers marvel at comic book power

Researchers marvel at comic book power
FORT BELVOIR, Va. — Ever wonder what the view would be like from Wonder Woman’s invisible jet?

Substitute the sleek comic book airplane with a uniquely modified Black Hawk helicopter, and one would have a good idea of the “see through” view pilots will have due to the work being done by a group from the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s communication and electronics center.

Over the past year, the Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center’s Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate has been working on the Advanced Distributed Aperture System, which gives aircrew superhero vision, enabling them to “see through” the helicopter.

Read more…

Fan us on  Facebook!Follow us on  Twitter!Contact us  on Flickr!Subscribe on YouTube!We're on CNN  iReport!Linkedin  discussions!


Bookmark and Share

NCO finds night vision enlightening

Army secretary tours research, development facilities
FORT BELVOIR, Va. — Deep in a large research facility tucked away in a secure corner of the base, scientists and engineers are working to see in the dark. The magic is made possible by technology and a team of smart individuals.

“At night, it can be dark, but nothing is ever completely dark,” said Staff Sgt. Milinda Williams, U.S.Army Research, Development and Engineering Command. “You always have some form of light whether it is the stars, the moon or some small artificial light.”

Read more…

Fan us on Facebook!Follow us on Twitter!Contact us on Flickr!Subscribe on YouTube!We're on CNN iReport!Linkedin discussions!

Army secretary tours research, development facilities

Army secretary visits Night Vision Lab
FORT BELVOIR, Va. — Army Secretary John McHugh toured research and development facilities here March 15. The Army’s senior civilian leader received briefings and hands-on time with high-tech gear, including night vision devices, next generation batteries, extremely accurate mortar rounds, explosive device detection gear and the latest recipes for Soldier cuisine in the field.

During his brief visit to the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s Night Vision and Electronic Sensor facility, the secretary put M-16 rifle rounds on target in near complete darkness using a night vision device. The 90-meter indoor range offers complete control over light conditions.
Read more…

RDECOM - View my 'Army secretary tours research, development facilities' set on Flickriver

Fan us on  Facebook!Follow us on Twitter!Contact us  on Flickr!Subscribe on YouTube!We're on CNN  iReport!Linkedin  discussions!


Bookmark and Share