Army to field new portable oxygen generator

The U.S. Army Medical Materiel Agency will soon begin fielding a new 12-pound portable oxygen generator that will drastically reduce logistical issues related to oxygen supply for patient care in the field. (U.S. Army photo by Adam Wyatt)

By Ellen Crown, USAMRMC Deputy Public Affairs Officer

FORT DETRICK, Md. (Oct. 21, 2015) — The U.S. Army Medical Materiel Agency will soon begin fielding a new 12-pound portable oxygen generator that will drastically reduce logistical issues related to oxygen supply for patient care in the field.

The USAMMA, a subordinate command of the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, plans to field the generators in its kits, such as air ambulance and ground ambulance, as well as unit assemblages provided for forward surgical teams, EMT/trauma and pre-op and intensive care ward/post-op. The generator will augment the ‘D’ cylinder for patient care and transport, providing a continuous supply of oxygen for non-critical patients using standard electrical power.

“Instead of lugging around 10 cylinders, which weigh 9 pounds each, a medic will now bring this one 12-pound device, which runs on a rechargeable battery and can produce three liters of 93 percent oxygen per minute,” said Maj. Norland James, assistant program manager of health care technologies at the USAMMA. “This is going to save the government countless dollars and reduce the giant logistical footprint that we have when it comes to patient care oxygen in the field.” Continue reading

Innovative treatments offer hope for burn victims

Soldiers from the 1st Armored Division, react to an explosion while participating in an urban combat exercise at a Fort Bliss, Texas, training facility May 11-12, 2011. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Joseph Wilbanks)

Soldiers from the 1st Armored Division, react to an explosion while participating in an urban combat exercise at a Fort Bliss, Texas, training facility May 11-12, 2011. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Joseph Wilbanks)

By Crystal Maynard, USAMRMC Public Affairs

Conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan brought a surge in burn and blast wound injuries from improvised explosive devices. Many who sustain such injuries endure years of rehabilitation and countless surgeries. Finding innovative strategies to heal these complex wounds more quickly, with fewer complications and less long-term impact from scarring, contractures and disability is a high priority for military medicine.

In 2008, the Department of Defense established the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine, led by the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine and Rutgers University. AFIRM was designed as a partnership between academia, industry and the government to deliver regenerative medicine therapies with the goal of restoring form and function to the most critically injured wounded warriors.

“Regenerative medicine is a rapidly growing area of science that aims to unlock the body’s own ability to rebuild, restore or replace damaged tissue and organs,” said Kristi Pottol, director of the Tissue Injury and Regenerative Medicine Program Management Office. “Much of regenerative medicine research in the civilian sector is focused on finding ways to reduce the burdens of chronic illness—diabetes, heart disease and others. The DOD wants to use these technologies to treat complex traumatic injuries.”

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Army research official visits Afghanistan

Cargo parachutes drop fuel to a combat outpost in Afghanistan, Sept. 16, 2011. Army researchers are testing a quick release system to be fielded later this year.

Cargo parachutes drop fuel to a combat outpost in Afghanistan, Sept. 16, 2011. Army researchers are testing a quick release system to be fielded later this year. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Maj. Matt DeLay)

 

BAGRAM AIRFIELD, Afghanistan (June 25, 2012) — A senior research and development leader spoke with Army officials here June 11-13. Army leaders in the field are seeking technology solutions for complex challenges.

“The commanders have a need for low-cost quick release systems for airdrop bundles,” said Dr. Jack Obusek, Sc.D., U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center director. “A quick release system would prevent cargo from being swept out of friendly hands when parachutes get dragged on the ground in high wind conditions.”

Army researchers have been developing prototype quick release devices and has plans to provide a substantial number to U.S. troops in Afghanistan later this year.

“We’re looking to significantly accelerate this effort and checking whether our forward deployed research center or stateside prototype facilities can produce the prototypes,” he said.

Obusek also discussed a possible far forward medical aid capability package. The research center and the PM and the medical community have recently entered full production on a modular medical package that will provide near intensive care unit-like capabilities to Soldiers serving forward.

Obusek said he received positive feedback from Soldiers on the First Strike Ration and the Army Combat Shirt — two initiatives developed at Natick. He met with medical staff to discuss new materials for protective equipment and received many great ideas for future technology development.

Obusek leads an 800-person military and civilian workforce at NSRDEC, located in Natick, Mass. The center is part of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command with the mission to maximize a Soldier’s survivability, sustainability, mobility and combat effectiveness.

This was Obusek’s first visit to Afghanistan since being named as the NSRDEC director in January 2011.

STTC deploys Hip-Pocket Training to Haiti

The Combat Medic Card Game allows medics to refresh skills after duty and during lulls.

The Combat Medic Card Game allows medics to refresh skills after duty and during lulls.

Military medical professionals serving in Haiti have a new way to stay on top of the latest training. The U.S. Army Simulation and Training Technology Center sent a Combat Medical Card Game to joint service medical units providing relief in Haiti. Michelle Milliner has the story. Read more…

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