Posts Tagged high-tech

RDECOM discusses contracting opportunities at 2013 APBI

U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command representatives discuss contracting opportunities with visitors during the Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry conference at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Dec. 4.

U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command representatives discuss contracting opportunities with visitors during the Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry conference at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Dec. 4.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Dec. 5, 2013) — The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command presented upcoming contracts Dec. 4 during APG’s second annual Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry conference.

Mary Miller, deputy assistant secretary of the Army for Research and Technology, discussed the current state and the future of Army science and technology during her keynote speech at the APG Post Theater. She emphasized that the research and development community will serve a key role in shaping the Army’s future after 12 years of war.

“It’s important to understand the role of science and technology and the balance we have to strike. Our responsibility is to build the Army of the future, but we still need to take care of the Army that we currently have,” Miller said. “Our balance has been changing as circumstances dictate. In the last decade of war, we have spent a lot of our time and thought equity helping the current force through urgent requirements and needs coming out of theater.

“We determined how to fix those problems that Soldiers have and give them critical solutions. As we’re coming out of war, we’re seeing the need to get back to our roots and look to the Army of the future.”

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RDECOM demonstrates advances in Army power, energy at Pentagon

Katherine Hammack (left), assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, talks with Robert Berlin, a mechanical engineer with RDECOM's Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, in the Pentagon Courtyard Nov. 14.

Katherine Hammack (left), assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, talks with Robert Berlin, a mechanical engineer with RDECOM’s Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, in the Pentagon Courtyard Nov. 14.

WASHINGTON (Nov. 14, 2013) — The U.S. Army showcased how its research and engineering centers are enabling advances in operational energy for Soldiers Nov. 14 at the Pentagon.

Subject matter experts from across the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command discussed their work in technologies that included Soldier-borne electronics, ground-vehicle fuel efficiency and sustainable base camps.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/WPam

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Army bolsters nation’s cybersecurity through STEM outreach

During the "Network and Cyber" week, students first learned about the complexities of computer networks and the steps required for a single e-mail to be sent. In this activity, more than 30 students each represented a step that an e-mail must take to go from one network to another as they sent a message across the classroom. The Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences course took place in July 2013 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

During the “Network and Cyber” week, students first learned about the complexities of computer networks and the steps required for a single e-mail to be sent. In this activity, more than 30 students each represented a step that an e-mail must take to go from one network to another as they sent a message across the classroom. The Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences course took place in July 2013 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Computer networks face persistent cyber threats from the nation’s adversaries. The future defenders of cyberspace, America’s students, honed their skills this summer as they learned from U.S. Army scientists and engineers who are experts in the field.

Cybersecurity practitioners from across the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command joined forces to spark an interest and share their knowledge with high-school students as part of the Army Educational Outreach Program at APG.

Two RDECOM organizations — Army Research Laboratory and the Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center — partnered to develop and deliver two Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences cyber programs in July.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/WrFC

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Army scientist advances biometrics through UK exchange program

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, participated in the Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program from August 2011 to July 2013. He worked at the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory's Sensors and Countermeasures Department.

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, participated in the Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program from August 2011 to July 2013. He worked at the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory’s Sensors and Countermeasures Department.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Oct. 23, 2013) — British and U.S. Army researchers are partnering to enhance biometric and surveillance capabilities as the result of an exchange program between the countries.

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, focused on advancing facial-recognition technologies during his two-year assignment in the United Kingdom.

“How far can we look and see who someone is? How can we help our Soldiers see better and farther?” said Leonard, who was assigned to the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory in Salisbury.

Leonard said he wanted to better understand how different countries approach similar scientific topics. When the DSTL chief executive visited Leonard’s organization to talk about possible collaborations, an area of mutual interest was biometrics. The discussions piqued Leonard’s interest.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/W3kG

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Army’s manufacturing improvements yield lighter body armor

Dr. Shawn Walsh (left), Agile Manufacturing Technology team leader at Army Research Laboratory, and Mike Thompson, an ARL contractor technician, unfurl a lightweight ballistic material for integration into body-armor processes at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Aug. 14, 2013.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Aug. 28, 2013) — Soldiers facing rugged terrain and extreme temperatures are continually searching for ways to reduce the weight of their gear.

In a search for solutions to this persistent issue, U.S. Army scientists and engineers have preliminarily demonstrated body armor that is 10 percent lighter through new manufacturing processes.

The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, known as RDECOM, along with its industry partners, has leveraged the Army’s Manufacturing Technology Program to spur the Advanced Body Armor Project.

 Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/D3Zd

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New guided munition sensors are greater than sum of their parts

A sensor array next to a quarter to reflect relative size.

A sensor array next to a quarter to reflect relative size.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (September 18, 2013) — When preparing to face a more talented opponent, coaches tell their players that the path to victory is pulling together as a team to somehow obtain more than a sum of each player’s talents.

For Army scientists, that same concept may have been expressed in the form of an advanced algorithm that gets optimum performance from a team of inertial sensors, which could be used to guide cannon-fired munitions to a target with near precision, even without Global Positioning Satellite navigation.

In addition to high performance, a big advantage to the team of sensors is greatly reduced cost.

Click here to read more.

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Conformal battery unburdens Army’s networked Soldiers

 

The Conformal Wearable Battery, which is shown being placed into a tactical vest, is flexible and conforms to the body. It provides more power, reduces the need for battery re-charging and spares, and serves as a single source of power for all worn electronic devices.

The Conformal Wearable Battery, which is shown being placed into a tactical vest, is flexible and conforms to the body. It provides more power, reduces the need for battery re-charging and spares, and serves as a single source of power for all worn electronic devices.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army is developing a battery to improve Soldiers’ agility on the battlefield while meeting the demands of an increased power burden stemming from new networked electronic devices.

The Conformal Wearable Battery is flexible and integrates into a Soldier’s body armor. It conforms to the body, which Army officials say is a significant upgrade to traditional batteries that are rectangular and bulky.

The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command and Program Executive Office Soldier have partnered to fulfill the requirements of today’s networked Soldier with the CWB.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/j4yw

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Army leads nation in push to digital manufacturing

 ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The Obama administration has chosen the U.S. Army to launch an institute with a goal to spur innovation in digital manufacturing, officials announced recently.

The Army is enlisting its Manufacturing Technology Program, commonly known as ManTech, to lead the establishment of the Digital Manufacturing and Design Innovation Institute, said Andy Davis, ManTech program manager within the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command.

“This is an RDECOM-led effort. This is an opportunity for the command to drive this area forward,” Davis said.

RDECOM manages ManTech on behalf of the deputy assistant secretary of the Army for Research and Technology, which has overall responsibility for the Army’s program.

Dr. Greg Harris, with RDECOM’s Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center at Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the DMDI Institute program manager for Army. He is leading the effort, with participation from the Air Force, Navy and nine other federal government agencies.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/jqJF

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External validation helps us realize how good we really are

Yessss.

Yessss.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — The Armament Software Engineering Center at the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center here was recently recognized as one of the top organizations within the federal government by earning a CMMI-DEV Maturity Level 5 distinction. We are the only U.S. Federal Government organization to currently hold that. To find out more about what a big deal that is, click here to read the whole story.

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U.S. Army, South Korean leaders discuss research, development partnerships

Brig. Gen. Daniel Hughes (center), deputy commanding general of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, briefs Dr. Jung Ho Ko (left), director of South Korea's Civilian Military Technology Cooperation Center, and Kim Ihn Cheol (right), a research fellow at CMTC, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., June 11.

Brig. Gen. Daniel Hughes (center), deputy commanding general of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, briefs Dr. Jung Ho Ko (left), director of South Korea’s Civilian Military Technology Cooperation Center, and Kim Ihn Cheol (right), a research fellow at CMTC, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., June 11.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (June 12, 2013) — U.S. Army and South Korean officials discussed potential collaboration in science and technology areas that benefit both the military and civilian sectors June 11.

Brig. Gen. Daniel Hughes, deputy commanding general of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, and Dr. Jung Ho Ko, director of South Korea’s Civilian Military Technology Cooperation Center, discussed how the countries could benefit from cooperation, especially in mutual areas of interest such as unmanned robotics, sensors and communications technologies.

Hughes said expanding the countries’ strong relationship into military research, development and engineering could spur great benefits.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/bQMe

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Picatinny engineers help West Point cadets patent their inventions

This man wants to help you patent your invention.

This man wants to help you patent your invention.

WEST POINT, N.Y. — Two West Point cadets invent something suspiciously similar to Batman’s grappling hook gun. Picatinny engineers rush to help cadets secure patents ahead of Wayne Enterprises.

Click here to read more.

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Future innovators exhibit talents at Maryland JSHS

Maryland students explore science and technology at the 2013 Maryland Junior Science and Humanities Symposium Innovative STEM Conference in Linthicum Heights, Md., March 8.

Maryland students explore science and technology at the 2013 Maryland Junior Science and Humanities Symposium Innovative STEM Conference in Linthicum Heights, Md., March 8.

LINTHICUM HEIGHTS, Md. — America’s next cancer research pioneer, space explorer or cyber security whiz could be one of the Maryland high-school students who presented their research at the Junior Science and Humanities Symposium.

Thirty-three students convened March 8 as part of the 2013 Maryland JSHS Innovative STEM Conference.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/28rY

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APG to launch centralized STEM education center

Harford County eighth-grade students explore science and engineering as part of the fifth annual Technology Needs Teens program at Harford Community College on May 24, 2012. The Aberdeen Proving Ground STEM Education and Outreach Center will be ready in late May 2013.

Harford County eighth-grade students explore science and engineering as part of the fifth annual Technology Needs Teens program at Harford Community College on May 24, 2012. The Aberdeen Proving Ground STEM Education and Outreach Center will be ready in late May 2013.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Maryland students will soon have a unified APG facility at which to explore the world of science and engineering with Army professionals.

The APG STEM Education and Outreach Center will be ready in late May, said Dr. Sandy Young, an Army Research Laboratory materials engineer. She is coordinating the project with ARL laboratory operations and other science, technology, engineering and mathematics outreach offices on APG.

Young said the SEOC will allow multiple APG tenant organizations to pool their resources to benefit students’ experiences in science and engineering. The facility will accommodate up to 200 students.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/4u5H

 

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Saving time, effort and $$$ with 3-D plans and schematics

When the Ds are 3, things are better all around for manufactures working with our plans and schematics.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — See how the Armament Research Development and Engineering Center teamed up with the Army Research Lab to get our plans and schematics up to speed with the rest of industry saving time, effort, and $$$. Because saving $$$ is kind of a big deal.

Click here to read more.

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eCYBERMISSION program registers a strong year in STEM outreach

eCYBERMISSION national finalists tour the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington June 20 as part of the week-long National Judging and Educational Event.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army’s eCYBERMISSION program reported a record year in 2012 for science, technology, engineering and mathematics outreach, officials announced.

eCYBERMISSION is one of several STEM efforts offered by the Army Educational Outreach Program. AEOP provides student opportunities from elementary school to college and includes STEM competitions, real-world research opportunities, summer programs, career fairs, teacher professional development, and student internships.

In the 2011-12 school year, 15,406 students and 690 team advisers participated, said Louie Lopez, STEM outreach program manager for the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command. Both figures are the largest in the program’s 10-year history.

RDECOM is the Army’s executive agent for the eCYBERMISSION program, a web-based STEM competition for sixth- through ninth-grade students, in which teams compete for awards while working to solve problems in their community. The program is designed to encourage students to become more actively engaged in STEM education.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/gSc4

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Aberdeen Proving Ground volunteers recognized for service to eCYBERMISSION program

 

Dale A. Ormond, director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, presents Lauren McNew with a Presidential Volunteer Service Award.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. – The U.S. Army honored three civilian employees, Dec. 19, for their commitment to enriching students’ experience in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, commonly known as STEM.

Dale A. Ormond, director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, thanked the employees for their efforts with the eCYBERMISSION program and presented each with a Presidential Volunteer Service Award.

“It’s great things to get kids engaged in science and engineering, looking at problems and coming up with innovative solutions. None of this is possible without volunteers,” Ormond said. “Science, technology and engineering is going to make a difference, and we have to get our young people involved.”

RDECOM is the Army’s executive agent for the eCYBERMISSION program, a free web-based STEM competition for sixth- through ninth-grade students, in which teams compete for awards while working to solve problems in their community.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/gfsH

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Army engineers design, build roadway threat detection system

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Explosives along roadways remain an unrelenting hazard for deployed Soldiers.

U.S. Army engineers have developed a system for detecting possible threats by identifying potential threat locations on unimproved roads.

The Shadow Class Infrared Spectral Sensor-Ground, known as SCISSOR-G, could allow Soldiers on a route clearance patrol to achieve greater standoff ranges during missions, said Jim Hilger, chief of the Signal and Image Processing Branch within the U.S. Army Communications–Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center’s Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate at Fort Belvoir, Va.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/gdGj

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Army biologist developing next-generation tools for Soldiers

 

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — U.S. Army scientists are developing new technologies, including smartphones that detect and identify chemical and biological agents, to empower Soldiers.

Dr. Calvin Chue, a research biologist with the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, or RDECOM, is focused on the next generation of devices to protect Soldiers and civilians against unknown chemical or biological threats.

To read more:

http://go.usa.gov/gT4Y

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Army engineers develop chargers for phones, laptops in combat

A team of U.S. Army engineers are developing new battery chargers for smartphones, tablet computers and laptops for deployed Soldiers without access to a traditional electrical grid. They have engineered and built prototypes for 8-port, 4-port, and 2-port USB chargers, as well as an AC/USB adapter — all of which use a military standard battery such as the BB-2590 as the main power source. The 150-watt USB/AC adaptor enables charging for a laptop and two smartphones.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Soldiers deployed to remote locations around the world need a lightweight charger for electronic devices that are critical to successful missions in the 21st century.

A team of U.S. Army engineers are developing new battery chargers for smartphones, tablet computers and laptops to use when there is no access to a traditional electrical grid. The team has engineered and built prototypes for 8-port, 4-port, and 2-port USB chargers, as well as an AC/USB adaptor, all of which use a military standard battery such as the BB-2590 as the main power source.

Electronics engineer Yuk Chan and electronics technician Ron Thompson are leading the effort for the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command. They develop solutions for Soldiers as part of the Command, Power and Integration Directorate at RDECOM’s Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, or CERDEC.

Read more on Army.mil

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Army chemist provides expertise on unknown samples

Jennifer Exelby leads 10 chemical-agent handlers for the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s Edgewood Chemical Biological Center.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — U.S. Army scientists analyze unknown samples to determine whether hazardous chemical or biological warfare agents are present. Samples come from around the world.

Jennifer Exelby, a chemist, leads 10 chemical-agent handlers for the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, or ECBC.

“I never would have thought that I would be working with chemical warfare materials,” said Exelby, who serves as the acting chief of the Chemical Operations Branch. “This is a world that I didn’t even know existed until I got the job at ECBC.”

Read more on Army.mil

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