Posts Tagged futuristic

Army bolsters nation’s cybersecurity through STEM outreach

During the "Network and Cyber" week, students first learned about the complexities of computer networks and the steps required for a single e-mail to be sent. In this activity, more than 30 students each represented a step that an e-mail must take to go from one network to another as they sent a message across the classroom. The Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences course took place in July 2013 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

During the “Network and Cyber” week, students first learned about the complexities of computer networks and the steps required for a single e-mail to be sent. In this activity, more than 30 students each represented a step that an e-mail must take to go from one network to another as they sent a message across the classroom. The Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences course took place in July 2013 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Computer networks face persistent cyber threats from the nation’s adversaries. The future defenders of cyberspace, America’s students, honed their skills this summer as they learned from U.S. Army scientists and engineers who are experts in the field.

Cybersecurity practitioners from across the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command joined forces to spark an interest and share their knowledge with high-school students as part of the Army Educational Outreach Program at APG.

Two RDECOM organizations — Army Research Laboratory and the Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center — partnered to develop and deliver two Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences cyber programs in July.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/WrFC

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Army scientist advances biometrics through UK exchange program

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, participated in the Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program from August 2011 to July 2013. He worked at the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory's Sensors and Countermeasures Department.

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, participated in the Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program from August 2011 to July 2013. He worked at the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory’s Sensors and Countermeasures Department.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Oct. 23, 2013) — British and U.S. Army researchers are partnering to enhance biometric and surveillance capabilities as the result of an exchange program between the countries.

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, focused on advancing facial-recognition technologies during his two-year assignment in the United Kingdom.

“How far can we look and see who someone is? How can we help our Soldiers see better and farther?” said Leonard, who was assigned to the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory in Salisbury.

Leonard said he wanted to better understand how different countries approach similar scientific topics. When the DSTL chief executive visited Leonard’s organization to talk about possible collaborations, an area of mutual interest was biometrics. The discussions piqued Leonard’s interest.

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http://go.usa.gov/W3kG

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Army’s manufacturing improvements yield lighter body armor

Dr. Shawn Walsh (left), Agile Manufacturing Technology team leader at Army Research Laboratory, and Mike Thompson, an ARL contractor technician, unfurl a lightweight ballistic material for integration into body-armor processes at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Aug. 14, 2013.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Aug. 28, 2013) — Soldiers facing rugged terrain and extreme temperatures are continually searching for ways to reduce the weight of their gear.

In a search for solutions to this persistent issue, U.S. Army scientists and engineers have preliminarily demonstrated body armor that is 10 percent lighter through new manufacturing processes.

The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, known as RDECOM, along with its industry partners, has leveraged the Army’s Manufacturing Technology Program to spur the Advanced Body Armor Project.

 Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/D3Zd

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New guided munition sensors are greater than sum of their parts

A sensor array next to a quarter to reflect relative size.

A sensor array next to a quarter to reflect relative size.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (September 18, 2013) — When preparing to face a more talented opponent, coaches tell their players that the path to victory is pulling together as a team to somehow obtain more than a sum of each player’s talents.

For Army scientists, that same concept may have been expressed in the form of an advanced algorithm that gets optimum performance from a team of inertial sensors, which could be used to guide cannon-fired munitions to a target with near precision, even without Global Positioning Satellite navigation.

In addition to high performance, a big advantage to the team of sensors is greatly reduced cost.

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U.S. Army, South Korean leaders discuss research, development partnerships

Brig. Gen. Daniel Hughes (center), deputy commanding general of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, briefs Dr. Jung Ho Ko (left), director of South Korea's Civilian Military Technology Cooperation Center, and Kim Ihn Cheol (right), a research fellow at CMTC, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., June 11.

Brig. Gen. Daniel Hughes (center), deputy commanding general of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, briefs Dr. Jung Ho Ko (left), director of South Korea’s Civilian Military Technology Cooperation Center, and Kim Ihn Cheol (right), a research fellow at CMTC, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., June 11.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (June 12, 2013) — U.S. Army and South Korean officials discussed potential collaboration in science and technology areas that benefit both the military and civilian sectors June 11.

Brig. Gen. Daniel Hughes, deputy commanding general of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, and Dr. Jung Ho Ko, director of South Korea’s Civilian Military Technology Cooperation Center, discussed how the countries could benefit from cooperation, especially in mutual areas of interest such as unmanned robotics, sensors and communications technologies.

Hughes said expanding the countries’ strong relationship into military research, development and engineering could spur great benefits.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/bQMe

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Future innovators exhibit talents at Maryland JSHS

Maryland students explore science and technology at the 2013 Maryland Junior Science and Humanities Symposium Innovative STEM Conference in Linthicum Heights, Md., March 8.

Maryland students explore science and technology at the 2013 Maryland Junior Science and Humanities Symposium Innovative STEM Conference in Linthicum Heights, Md., March 8.

LINTHICUM HEIGHTS, Md. — America’s next cancer research pioneer, space explorer or cyber security whiz could be one of the Maryland high-school students who presented their research at the Junior Science and Humanities Symposium.

Thirty-three students convened March 8 as part of the 2013 Maryland JSHS Innovative STEM Conference.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/28rY

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APG to launch centralized STEM education center

Harford County eighth-grade students explore science and engineering as part of the fifth annual Technology Needs Teens program at Harford Community College on May 24, 2012. The Aberdeen Proving Ground STEM Education and Outreach Center will be ready in late May 2013.

Harford County eighth-grade students explore science and engineering as part of the fifth annual Technology Needs Teens program at Harford Community College on May 24, 2012. The Aberdeen Proving Ground STEM Education and Outreach Center will be ready in late May 2013.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Maryland students will soon have a unified APG facility at which to explore the world of science and engineering with Army professionals.

The APG STEM Education and Outreach Center will be ready in late May, said Dr. Sandy Young, an Army Research Laboratory materials engineer. She is coordinating the project with ARL laboratory operations and other science, technology, engineering and mathematics outreach offices on APG.

Young said the SEOC will allow multiple APG tenant organizations to pool their resources to benefit students’ experiences in science and engineering. The facility will accommodate up to 200 students.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/4u5H

 

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eCYBERMISSION program registers a strong year in STEM outreach

eCYBERMISSION national finalists tour the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington June 20 as part of the week-long National Judging and Educational Event.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army’s eCYBERMISSION program reported a record year in 2012 for science, technology, engineering and mathematics outreach, officials announced.

eCYBERMISSION is one of several STEM efforts offered by the Army Educational Outreach Program. AEOP provides student opportunities from elementary school to college and includes STEM competitions, real-world research opportunities, summer programs, career fairs, teacher professional development, and student internships.

In the 2011-12 school year, 15,406 students and 690 team advisers participated, said Louie Lopez, STEM outreach program manager for the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command. Both figures are the largest in the program’s 10-year history.

RDECOM is the Army’s executive agent for the eCYBERMISSION program, a web-based STEM competition for sixth- through ninth-grade students, in which teams compete for awards while working to solve problems in their community. The program is designed to encourage students to become more actively engaged in STEM education.

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http://go.usa.gov/gSc4

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Aberdeen Proving Ground volunteers recognized for service to eCYBERMISSION program

 

Dale A. Ormond, director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, presents Lauren McNew with a Presidential Volunteer Service Award.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. – The U.S. Army honored three civilian employees, Dec. 19, for their commitment to enriching students’ experience in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, commonly known as STEM.

Dale A. Ormond, director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, thanked the employees for their efforts with the eCYBERMISSION program and presented each with a Presidential Volunteer Service Award.

“It’s great things to get kids engaged in science and engineering, looking at problems and coming up with innovative solutions. None of this is possible without volunteers,” Ormond said. “Science, technology and engineering is going to make a difference, and we have to get our young people involved.”

RDECOM is the Army’s executive agent for the eCYBERMISSION program, a free web-based STEM competition for sixth- through ninth-grade students, in which teams compete for awards while working to solve problems in their community.

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http://go.usa.gov/gfsH

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APG organizations establish STEM agreement with Harford schools

 

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army is bolstering its commitment to science and math education in northeast Maryland to increase the number of students seeking high-tech careers.

Eight major APG tenant organizations agreed to a partnership Dec. 14 with Harford County Public Schools to expand educational outreach efforts in science, technology, engineering and math, commonly known as STEM.

The agreement will help increase participation and improve HCPS students’ performance in STEM and programs that expand academic opportunities, officials said.

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http://go.usa.gov/gVGC

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Army biologist developing next-generation tools for Soldiers

 

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — U.S. Army scientists are developing new technologies, including smartphones that detect and identify chemical and biological agents, to empower Soldiers.

Dr. Calvin Chue, a research biologist with the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, or RDECOM, is focused on the next generation of devices to protect Soldiers and civilians against unknown chemical or biological threats.

To read more:

http://go.usa.gov/gT4Y

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Army engineers develop chargers for phones, laptops in combat

A team of U.S. Army engineers are developing new battery chargers for smartphones, tablet computers and laptops for deployed Soldiers without access to a traditional electrical grid. They have engineered and built prototypes for 8-port, 4-port, and 2-port USB chargers, as well as an AC/USB adapter — all of which use a military standard battery such as the BB-2590 as the main power source. The 150-watt USB/AC adaptor enables charging for a laptop and two smartphones.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Soldiers deployed to remote locations around the world need a lightweight charger for electronic devices that are critical to successful missions in the 21st century.

A team of U.S. Army engineers are developing new battery chargers for smartphones, tablet computers and laptops to use when there is no access to a traditional electrical grid. The team has engineered and built prototypes for 8-port, 4-port, and 2-port USB chargers, as well as an AC/USB adaptor, all of which use a military standard battery such as the BB-2590 as the main power source.

Electronics engineer Yuk Chan and electronics technician Ron Thompson are leading the effort for the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command. They develop solutions for Soldiers as part of the Command, Power and Integration Directorate at RDECOM’s Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, or CERDEC.

Read more on Army.mil

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Secretary of Defense tours RDECOM contributions to energy security

Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta examines the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s Fuel Efficient Ground Vehicle Demonstrator Bravo at the Pentagon Oct. 4.

 WASHINGTON – Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta learned about the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s contributions to national energy security during a tour of exhibits at the Pentagon, Oct. 4.

Subject matter experts from three of RDECOM’s research centers — the Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center; Communications–Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center; and Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center — showcased the Army’s research on operational energy.

Read more on Army.mil

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Aberdeen Proving Ground leaders discuss vision for STEM education outreach

 

About 400 middle and high-school school students from Harford and Cecil counties explored Army technology, Sept. 23, 2011, during the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Educational Outreach Day at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

 

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Because of Aberdeen Proving Ground’s new role as the Army’s hub for science and technology, officials say the installation has the opportunity to become a national leader in science, technology, engineering and math education outreach.

The thousands of scientists and engineers at Aberdeen Proving Ground, or APG, should spur innovation as the Army promotes interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, said Patrick Baker, who recently assumed the newly created position of APG STEM Champion.

Read more on Army.mil

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Scientist begins Army career, protects nation against chemical warfare agents

 

Brandon Bruey, a chemist with the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, handles, synthesizes, purifies and destroys chemical agents.

 

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — A recent college graduate moved from Texas to Maryland so he could work with the best scientists in the field of chemical defense.

Brandon Bruey, a chemist with the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, said his position allows him the best opportunity to use classroom principles for real-world applications.

Read more on Army.mil

 

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Army scientist recalls six decades of inquiry, breakthroughs

Harry Salem serves as chief scientist of life sciences for the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s Edgewood Chemical Biological Center.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — After more than 60 years as a researcher, educator and mentor, Harry Salem remains committed to advancing the field of science in the U.S. Army.

Salem’s talents and expertise led to an already distinguished career spanning three decades in pharmacology and toxicology — including the development of the cold and cough remedies NyQuil and Contac as well as the extended-wear soft contact lens Permalens — all before joining the Army as a civilian scientist in 1984.

In his current role as the chief scientist of life sciences, Salem oversees and guides research efforts at the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s Edgewood Chemical Biological Center. He has recently created a Center of Excellence for Stem Cell Research, recruiting 12 post-doctoral students to help embark on his vision.

Read more on Army.mil

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Zap! Picatinny engineers set phasers to ‘fry’

Verily, we shot this car with a laser-guided lightning bolt (Mjolnir not required).

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Scientists and engineers at Picatinny Arsenal are busy developing a device that will shoot lightning bolts down laser beams to destroy its target. Soldiers and science fiction fans, you’re welcome.

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Army promotes science, technology opportunities to Harford students

Edgewood Middle School students extract strawberry DNA during the Technology Needs Teens program at Harford Community College May 24 at Bel Air, Md. (U.S. Army photo by Conrad Johnson)

Edgewood Middle School students extract strawberry DNA during the Technology Needs Teens program at Harford Community College May 24 at Bel Air, Md. (U.S. Army photo by Conrad Johnson)

By Dan Lafontaine, RDECOM Public Affairs

BEL AIR, Md. — Eighth-grade students explored emerging global-mapping software and DNA extraction with U.S. Army scientists May 24 to boost their interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM education.

The Army, technology manufacturers and universities joined about 180 eighth-graders from nine Harford County middle schools. The scientists showcased the array of career opportunities in STEM fields as part of the fifth annual Technology Needs Teens program at Harford Community College.

Lanie Wallace, a research biologist with the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, led students through a hands-on demonstration of extracting DNA from a strawberry. She explained the range of applications for DNA research, including medical, pharmaceutical and agricultural.

Mary Doak, ECBC’s community and educational outreach manager, said the country needs students to pursue STEM careers because a large number of scientists and engineers are nearing retirement age.

At ECBC, 44 percent of employees are eligible for retirement within 10 years, Doak said. The Department of Defense has 35,000 scientists, 56 percent of whom can retire within eight years.

Wallace, who attended Edgewood middle and high schools, has started work on a doctorate degree, which is paid for by the DoD through the Science, Mathematics and Research for Transformation Scholarship for Service Program.

Doak encouraged the students to pursue DoD-sponsored scholarships and internship programs, including SMART; Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences, or GEMS; Science and Engineering Apprenticeship Program, or SEAP; and eCYBERMISSION.

Matt Sparaco, a computer scientist with U.S. Army Communications–Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, demonstrated the Command and Control Multitouch Enabled Technology, or COMET, to Patterson Mill Middle School students.

The COMET is a large touchscreen computer that can be mounted vertically to a wall or set up horizontally like a table. Sparaco said CERDEC is developing software to track Soldier patrols, detect enemy fire and view damage from natural disasters.

Students explored the COMET by locating local landmarks using the mapping feature to create fictional scenarios.

Sparaco said researchers are also hoping to add facial-recognition software to allow Soldiers to take a photo with a smartphone or tablet and identify potential enemies. He said the Army plans to transition the software to flexible displays that Soldiers will wear on their uniforms during combat operations.

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During assessment, Soldiers prefer lighter machine gun

An Air Force range control officer at Marine Corps Base Quantico fires the LSAT LMG for the very first time.

QUANTICO, Va. — A military utility assessment held at Fort Benning, Ga., in September 2011 has concluded that all participating Soldiers immediately noticed the reduced weight of a prototype light machine gun and most would prefer it to the current squad automatic weapon used in battle.

The light machine gun (LMG) is part of the Lightweight Small Arms Technologies (LSAT) program at the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center at Picatinny Arsenal.

Click here to read more

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RDECOM senior NCO discusses command’s support in Afghanistan

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Command Sgt. Maj. Lebert Beharie, the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s senior noncommissioned officer, returned May 13 from a nine-day mission to Afghanistan.

In an interview with RDECOM public affairs, Beharie discussed how the command is providing the technological edge to Soldiers deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

What were your objectives during your first visit to Operation Enduring Freedom as RDECOM’s command sergeant major?

“It was two-fold. First, we have folks who are doing great work in harm’s way, supporting the Warfighter. I wanted to pay them a visit, let them know who I am, and talk with them; get their concerns and issues they are dealing with; hear about some of the opportunities they had to support our Warfighter; technologies they were able to help field.

Second, [I wanted] to meet the senior enlisted Soldiers in the battlespace and hear from them how [RDECOM is] doing providing them the resources and technology to fight on the battlefield. That part is just as important. If they don’t know that we’re there or don’t know what value we add, we quickly become low-hanging fruit. As [the Army] ramps down in theater, we become the first to go home. That would be a tragedy to leave the Soldiers without the technology or the connection to the technology that we are able to give from our labs.”

As you talked with the Soldiers and civilians supporting OEF, what support do they need from RDECOM?

“When I was a Warfighter, I did not know what RDECOM provided me. Throughout the [Army Force Generation] process and the re-set process, there was a lot of technology that came my way that we, as a unit, had to integrate into our organization.

It’s the same thing with the Soldiers currently in theater. Some do not know RDECOM existed. They received technology and support from RDECOM, but we need to do better with our strategic communications and getting the word out. Part of my reasoning for going to theater is to get the word out [what] we, as RDECOM, provide and how we can better assist our Soldiers.”

How can RDECOM’s scientists and engineers in the United States do better to provide timely solutions to address these needs?

“I think the lines of communication, the resources that we have, and the reachback capability that we have to our labs, scientists and engineers — I think that is what we need to do better.
Our scientists and engineers are doing a fabulous job supporting our Warfighters. They come to work every day energized. For us to have the reachback from [Soldiers and commanders in] theater, our [Logistics Assistance Representative and Field Service Representatives] help by telling us where the gaps are. [We] fill those gaps in our labs with an emerging technology or [with] equipment we already built to increase capabilities on the battlefield. I think our scientists and engineers are doing a great job.”

Where in Afghanistan did you go?

“I had the opportunity to tour the entire breadth of Afghanistan where major commands are. Those are the hubs. If you get the commands and hubs to understand the type of support that we provide on a daily basis, that will proliferate across the subordinate commands.
We met with [Regional Command]-South and talked with them about our lines of effort and support. [We made] sure we are linked [for] them reaching back to us. They have several ways to get to us. The [Rapid Equipping Force] 10-liner will come back to us. The [Operational Needs Statement] [Joint Urgent Operational Needs Statement] process will come back to us. Our [Science and Technology Assistance Teams] in theater will bring stuff back to us to action and provide material solutions to Warfighters.”

How does the RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center accomplish its mission of providing engineering solutions to Soldiers directly in theater?

“What a tremendous capability to our Soldiers. This is a big win for the Army. This is a battlefield enabler having the RFAST-C that forward in theater. In six months, they have done over 177 projects for theater. That is throughout the [Combined Joint Operation Area], throughout the battlespace. While I was there, they were working on projects for the [Afghanistan Working Group] for the Afghan Army. They are working on engineering projects for the Air Force’s AC-130.

You name it, they are working on it. You have a Soldier who walks up to the RFAST-C and says, ‘Hey, I have a problem.’ I met that Soldier, a specialist. He showed me how he came up with the design, his drawings, what he envisioned, and the problem he had. He walked up to one of our engineers and said, ‘Hey, here is a problem that I have. Here is what I think a solution could be. Can you do something about this?’ Our scientist said, ‘Absolutely we can do something about it.’ They put the engineering mental muscle behind it and came up with a great product to fill that Soldier’s problem. This proliferates on the battlefield. It was a game-changer. This was an adjustment that had to be made because of new technology that we sent to theater to protect our Soldiers. We had to adjust how we placed certain items on vehicles.

I cannot speak enough about how great of a resource [the RFAST-C] it is for theater. I spoke to RC-South, RC-East, RC-Capital. I’ve talked to every command, all the way through [International Security Assistance Force] Command, and they all are singing the praises of what we are doing in theater.”

How will RDECOM leverage the experience gained from establishing RFAST-C in OEF to set up a similar capability for future Army or joint operations?

“The Army is looking at what it calls ‘RFAST-C in a Box.’ It probably will not have all the capabilities that our current RFAST-C has, but it will have a lot of those capabilities. There are some capabilities that the Army had previously within the [Army Field Support Brigades] that are provided in theater; however, not in the quality and quantity that is provided through the RFAST-C. With our emerging technologies, I can see sometime in the future that we are going to have an ‘RFAST-C in a Box’ traveling around the battlespace. I think this was the birth of a great idea that will help the Warfighter for a long time to come.”

How can RDECOM continue to share its initiatives and contributions with the Army?

“[RDECOM Director] Mr. [Dale] Ormond sat down with the Board of Directors and came up with six lines of effort. One of the lines of effort is strategic communications. I think I can impact that in a big way through the senior enlisted leaders engagement throughout the Army.

Seeing the senior enlisted leaders in theater is great. However, I think that communication needs to start back here at home. One of the initiatives that I have started is to go out and see the divisions and the major unit commands at home before they go to theater. Let them know what we are and what we do. The Army has an educational process for deployers. Give them ways that they can enhance the performance of their Soldiers and equipment on the battlefield. One of those resources is RDECOM.

I think that we need to make ourselves part of that educational process. Let RDECOM be one of those stops that those commands will make prior to going to theater. There is no doubt in my mind that it will be an enormous game-changing opportunity for those commands. I will take the message out and let them know what we are, who we are, and what we can do for them as they fight our nation’s wars.”

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