Posts Tagged future

Army scientist advances biometrics through UK exchange program

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, participated in the Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program from August 2011 to July 2013. He worked at the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory's Sensors and Countermeasures Department.

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, participated in the Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program from August 2011 to July 2013. He worked at the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory’s Sensors and Countermeasures Department.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Oct. 23, 2013) — British and U.S. Army researchers are partnering to enhance biometric and surveillance capabilities as the result of an exchange program between the countries.

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, focused on advancing facial-recognition technologies during his two-year assignment in the United Kingdom.

“How far can we look and see who someone is? How can we help our Soldiers see better and farther?” said Leonard, who was assigned to the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory in Salisbury.

Leonard said he wanted to better understand how different countries approach similar scientific topics. When the DSTL chief executive visited Leonard’s organization to talk about possible collaborations, an area of mutual interest was biometrics. The discussions piqued Leonard’s interest.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/W3kG

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Picatinny advances ‘computer chip of the future’

The Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) at Picatinny recently won the 2013 Federal Laboratory Consortium Northeast Region Award for its excellence in technology transfer as demonstrated by its HyperX chip technology.

The Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center at Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., recently won the 2013 Federal Laboratory Consortium Northeast Region Award for its excellence in technology transfer as demonstrated by its HyperX chip technology.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (September 25, 2013) — As the power and popularity of mobile devices grows, so does the desire for faster data processing without consuming much power.

The HyperX computer chip technology, under development by researchers at Picatinny Arsenal holds the promise to deliver that goal for both commercial and military users.

The small, HyperX chip was intentionally designed to meet high volume, low power processing requirements.

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Army’s manufacturing improvements yield lighter body armor

Dr. Shawn Walsh (left), Agile Manufacturing Technology team leader at Army Research Laboratory, and Mike Thompson, an ARL contractor technician, unfurl a lightweight ballistic material for integration into body-armor processes at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Aug. 14, 2013.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Aug. 28, 2013) — Soldiers facing rugged terrain and extreme temperatures are continually searching for ways to reduce the weight of their gear.

In a search for solutions to this persistent issue, U.S. Army scientists and engineers have preliminarily demonstrated body armor that is 10 percent lighter through new manufacturing processes.

The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, known as RDECOM, along with its industry partners, has leveraged the Army’s Manufacturing Technology Program to spur the Advanced Body Armor Project.

 Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/D3Zd

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New guided munition sensors are greater than sum of their parts

A sensor array next to a quarter to reflect relative size.

A sensor array next to a quarter to reflect relative size.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (September 18, 2013) — When preparing to face a more talented opponent, coaches tell their players that the path to victory is pulling together as a team to somehow obtain more than a sum of each player’s talents.

For Army scientists, that same concept may have been expressed in the form of an advanced algorithm that gets optimum performance from a team of inertial sensors, which could be used to guide cannon-fired munitions to a target with near precision, even without Global Positioning Satellite navigation.

In addition to high performance, a big advantage to the team of sensors is greatly reduced cost.

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High school graduate gets personal tour of Picatinny labs

This high school graduate (right) impressed us so much with his research on nanotechnology that he got invited for a personal tour of our nanotechnology labs.

This high school graduate (right) impressed us so much with his research on nanotechnology that he got invited for a personal tour of our nanotechnology labs.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — So there was this high school student who just graduated this year who presented a paper at the Monmouth Junior Science Symposium that was so thorough with his independent research on nanotechnology that we just had to get him a personal invite to come and tour our labs. Seriously exciting.

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APG unveils center for STEM, education outreach

U.S. Army officials prepare to cut the ribbon of the Aberdeen Proving Ground STEM and Education Outreach Center July 30. From left: Col. Gregory McClinton, APG Garrison commander; Robert Carter, executive technical director of the Army Test and Evaluation Command; Dr. Thomas Russell, director of the Army Research Laboratory; Maj. Gen. Robert Ferrell, commanding general of the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command and APG senior commander; Nicole Racine, a University of Maryland-Baltimore County sophomore; Dale Ormond, director of the Army Research, Development and Engineering Command; Jeffrey Singleton, director of basic research, laboratory management and educational outreach for the assistant secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology; Suzanne Milchling, program integration director of the Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center; and Robert Zanzalari, associate director of the Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center.

 ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Aspiring scientists and engineers are now exploring their future careers at a unified APG facility dedicated to education outreach.

APG ushered in a new era of partnerships in science, technology, engineering and mathematics for northeast Maryland with a ribbon-cutting ceremony July 30.

The APG STEM and Education Outreach Center brings tenant organizations together to pool resources that will enhance students’ experiences in scientific and engineering disciplines. The facility accommodates up to 200 students.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/jnM4

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Conformal battery unburdens Army’s networked Soldiers

 

The Conformal Wearable Battery, which is shown being placed into a tactical vest, is flexible and conforms to the body. It provides more power, reduces the need for battery re-charging and spares, and serves as a single source of power for all worn electronic devices.

The Conformal Wearable Battery, which is shown being placed into a tactical vest, is flexible and conforms to the body. It provides more power, reduces the need for battery re-charging and spares, and serves as a single source of power for all worn electronic devices.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army is developing a battery to improve Soldiers’ agility on the battlefield while meeting the demands of an increased power burden stemming from new networked electronic devices.

The Conformal Wearable Battery is flexible and integrates into a Soldier’s body armor. It conforms to the body, which Army officials say is a significant upgrade to traditional batteries that are rectangular and bulky.

The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command and Program Executive Office Soldier have partnered to fulfill the requirements of today’s networked Soldier with the CWB.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/j4yw

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U.S. Army, South Korean leaders discuss research, development partnerships

Brig. Gen. Daniel Hughes (center), deputy commanding general of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, briefs Dr. Jung Ho Ko (left), director of South Korea's Civilian Military Technology Cooperation Center, and Kim Ihn Cheol (right), a research fellow at CMTC, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., June 11.

Brig. Gen. Daniel Hughes (center), deputy commanding general of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, briefs Dr. Jung Ho Ko (left), director of South Korea’s Civilian Military Technology Cooperation Center, and Kim Ihn Cheol (right), a research fellow at CMTC, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., June 11.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (June 12, 2013) — U.S. Army and South Korean officials discussed potential collaboration in science and technology areas that benefit both the military and civilian sectors June 11.

Brig. Gen. Daniel Hughes, deputy commanding general of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, and Dr. Jung Ho Ko, director of South Korea’s Civilian Military Technology Cooperation Center, discussed how the countries could benefit from cooperation, especially in mutual areas of interest such as unmanned robotics, sensors and communications technologies.

Hughes said expanding the countries’ strong relationship into military research, development and engineering could spur great benefits.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/bQMe

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Picatinny engineers help West Point cadets patent their inventions

This man wants to help you patent your invention.

This man wants to help you patent your invention.

WEST POINT, N.Y. — Two West Point cadets invent something suspiciously similar to Batman’s grappling hook gun. Picatinny engineers rush to help cadets secure patents ahead of Wayne Enterprises.

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Picatinny introduce girls to engineering

Girls, meet engineering.

Girls, meet engineering.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Local area high school students were invited to our “Introduce a Girl to Engineering” night. We like to think it went well.

Click here to read more.

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APG to launch centralized STEM education center

Harford County eighth-grade students explore science and engineering as part of the fifth annual Technology Needs Teens program at Harford Community College on May 24, 2012. The Aberdeen Proving Ground STEM Education and Outreach Center will be ready in late May 2013.

Harford County eighth-grade students explore science and engineering as part of the fifth annual Technology Needs Teens program at Harford Community College on May 24, 2012. The Aberdeen Proving Ground STEM Education and Outreach Center will be ready in late May 2013.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Maryland students will soon have a unified APG facility at which to explore the world of science and engineering with Army professionals.

The APG STEM Education and Outreach Center will be ready in late May, said Dr. Sandy Young, an Army Research Laboratory materials engineer. She is coordinating the project with ARL laboratory operations and other science, technology, engineering and mathematics outreach offices on APG.

Young said the SEOC will allow multiple APG tenant organizations to pool their resources to benefit students’ experiences in science and engineering. The facility will accommodate up to 200 students.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/4u5H

 

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Greater than the sum of its parts

Collectively, we’re the Lucius Fox for the U.S. Army.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Dale Ormond, director of RDECOM, stopped at Picatinny to deliver an important message. Click the link to find out what he had to say.

Click here to read more.

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Saving time, effort and $$$ with 3-D plans and schematics

When the Ds are 3, things are better all around for manufactures working with our plans and schematics.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — See how the Armament Research Development and Engineering Center teamed up with the Army Research Lab to get our plans and schematics up to speed with the rest of industry saving time, effort, and $$$. Because saving $$$ is kind of a big deal.

Click here to read more.

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eCYBERMISSION program registers a strong year in STEM outreach

eCYBERMISSION national finalists tour the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington June 20 as part of the week-long National Judging and Educational Event.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army’s eCYBERMISSION program reported a record year in 2012 for science, technology, engineering and mathematics outreach, officials announced.

eCYBERMISSION is one of several STEM efforts offered by the Army Educational Outreach Program. AEOP provides student opportunities from elementary school to college and includes STEM competitions, real-world research opportunities, summer programs, career fairs, teacher professional development, and student internships.

In the 2011-12 school year, 15,406 students and 690 team advisers participated, said Louie Lopez, STEM outreach program manager for the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command. Both figures are the largest in the program’s 10-year history.

RDECOM is the Army’s executive agent for the eCYBERMISSION program, a web-based STEM competition for sixth- through ninth-grade students, in which teams compete for awards while working to solve problems in their community. The program is designed to encourage students to become more actively engaged in STEM education.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/gSc4

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Aberdeen Proving Ground volunteers recognized for service to eCYBERMISSION program

 

Dale A. Ormond, director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, presents Lauren McNew with a Presidential Volunteer Service Award.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. – The U.S. Army honored three civilian employees, Dec. 19, for their commitment to enriching students’ experience in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, commonly known as STEM.

Dale A. Ormond, director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, thanked the employees for their efforts with the eCYBERMISSION program and presented each with a Presidential Volunteer Service Award.

“It’s great things to get kids engaged in science and engineering, looking at problems and coming up with innovative solutions. None of this is possible without volunteers,” Ormond said. “Science, technology and engineering is going to make a difference, and we have to get our young people involved.”

RDECOM is the Army’s executive agent for the eCYBERMISSION program, a free web-based STEM competition for sixth- through ninth-grade students, in which teams compete for awards while working to solve problems in their community.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/gfsH

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APG organizations establish STEM agreement with Harford schools

 

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army is bolstering its commitment to science and math education in northeast Maryland to increase the number of students seeking high-tech careers.

Eight major APG tenant organizations agreed to a partnership Dec. 14 with Harford County Public Schools to expand educational outreach efforts in science, technology, engineering and math, commonly known as STEM.

The agreement will help increase participation and improve HCPS students’ performance in STEM and programs that expand academic opportunities, officials said.

Read more:
http://go.usa.gov/gVGC

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Army biologist developing next-generation tools for Soldiers

 

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — U.S. Army scientists are developing new technologies, including smartphones that detect and identify chemical and biological agents, to empower Soldiers.

Dr. Calvin Chue, a research biologist with the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, or RDECOM, is focused on the next generation of devices to protect Soldiers and civilians against unknown chemical or biological threats.

To read more:

http://go.usa.gov/gT4Y

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Army engineers develop chargers for phones, laptops in combat

A team of U.S. Army engineers are developing new battery chargers for smartphones, tablet computers and laptops for deployed Soldiers without access to a traditional electrical grid. They have engineered and built prototypes for 8-port, 4-port, and 2-port USB chargers, as well as an AC/USB adapter — all of which use a military standard battery such as the BB-2590 as the main power source. The 150-watt USB/AC adaptor enables charging for a laptop and two smartphones.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Soldiers deployed to remote locations around the world need a lightweight charger for electronic devices that are critical to successful missions in the 21st century.

A team of U.S. Army engineers are developing new battery chargers for smartphones, tablet computers and laptops to use when there is no access to a traditional electrical grid. The team has engineered and built prototypes for 8-port, 4-port, and 2-port USB chargers, as well as an AC/USB adaptor, all of which use a military standard battery such as the BB-2590 as the main power source.

Electronics engineer Yuk Chan and electronics technician Ron Thompson are leading the effort for the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command. They develop solutions for Soldiers as part of the Command, Power and Integration Directorate at RDECOM’s Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, or CERDEC.

Read more on Army.mil

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Army chemist provides expertise on unknown samples

Jennifer Exelby leads 10 chemical-agent handlers for the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s Edgewood Chemical Biological Center.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — U.S. Army scientists analyze unknown samples to determine whether hazardous chemical or biological warfare agents are present. Samples come from around the world.

Jennifer Exelby, a chemist, leads 10 chemical-agent handlers for the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, or ECBC.

“I never would have thought that I would be working with chemical warfare materials,” said Exelby, who serves as the acting chief of the Chemical Operations Branch. “This is a world that I didn’t even know existed until I got the job at ECBC.”

Read more on Army.mil

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Secretary of Defense tours RDECOM contributions to energy security

Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta examines the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s Fuel Efficient Ground Vehicle Demonstrator Bravo at the Pentagon Oct. 4.

 WASHINGTON – Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta learned about the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s contributions to national energy security during a tour of exhibits at the Pentagon, Oct. 4.

Subject matter experts from three of RDECOM’s research centers — the Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center; Communications–Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center; and Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center — showcased the Army’s research on operational energy.

Read more on Army.mil

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