Picatinny to remove tons of toxins from lethal rounds

Belts of .50 caliber ammunition await U.S. Soldiers with the 6th Engineer Battalion, 2nd Engineer Brigade, as they prepare to conduct qualifications on the M2 .50 caliber machine gun at a range in Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Aug. 14, 2012. The Pyrotechnics Division of the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center, at Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., is developing an alternate formula for certain armor-piercing incendiary projectiles that is friendlier to the environment than the chemicals currently being used.

Belts of .50 caliber ammunition await U.S. Soldiers with the 6th Engineer Battalion, 2nd Engineer Brigade, as they prepare to conduct qualifications on the M2 .50 caliber machine gun at a range in Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Aug. 14, 2012. Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (August 22, 2013) — An enemy convoy transporting a supply of fuel rumbles across the desert floor, an ideal target for armor-piercing incendiary projectiles.

These projectiles are most useful for “after-armor effects,” such as an incandescent flash immediately after penetrating a hard target. The resulting plume may be useful for devastating any fuel-storage facilities by igniting the fuel vapors.

The Army uses a formulation called IM-28 that is charged into certain armor-piercing incendiary projectiles, which can be fired from such weapons as the M2, M3, and M85 machine guns.

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Delayed reaction

One day, this technology may make Fourth of July fireworks that much more environmentally safe. If you love America, you have to love that.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Pyrotechnic delays are more common than you may think. Fourth of July and New years fireworks are when we see them on display (literally). Now think how awesome it would be if we made those pyrotechnic delays safer for the environment. Okay, stop thinking about it and start reading about it in our article. Link below!

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ECBC recognized for success in Operation Swift Solution

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Army officials honored the efforts of 51 key members of the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center Nov. 10 in a ceremony here. The workers completed a project to eliminate health and safety risks associated with continued storage of containers as well as other accumulated wastes. “What was achieved through Operation Swift Solution is nothing short of excellent,” said Deputy Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Chemical and Biological Defense and Chemical Demilitarization Jean Reed. Assembled Chemical Weapons Alternatives Program Manager Kevin Flamm recognized all contributors with certificates of appreciation and the program’s leaders with honorary ACWA program manager coins.Read more…


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