Chemical-biological researchers deliver results

Edgewood Chemical Biological Center engineers fielded the next-generation M50 mask to U.S. Soldiers stationed in Japan and Korea.

Edgewood Chemical Biological Center engineers fielded the next-generation M50 mask to U.S. Soldiers stationed in Japan and Korea.

Soldiers stay lethal in any environment

ECBC Public Affairs

Choking, watering eyes, blistering skin and convulsions are symptoms of imminent death from a chemical weapons attack. The lethality of such attacks, most recently in August 2013 in Syria, sends tremors across the globe.

For Soldiers, chemical weapons present a real danger on the battlefield that requires advanced technology to keep them safe. The Army is investing in science and technology to enable Soldiers to operate in a chemical-biological threat environment.

Scientists and researchers at the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center work to provide better protective equipment, such as the iconic protective mask. As threats evolve, ECBC engineers fielded the next-generation M50 mask to Soldiers stationed in Japan and Korea. The Army is fielding more than 1 million of these masks across the Department of Defense.

“I noticed the difference between the M50 and the old M40 mask as soon as I put it on,” said Sgt. James Tuthill, a training noncommissioned officer stationed at the Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C. “I train Marines to be prepared for chemical, biological and radiological hot zones, and this mask provides them with better visibility, easier breathing and greater comfort wearing it. On top of all that, it just looks cool.”

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