Posts Tagged ECBC

DOD honors Army Civilians for eliminating Syrian chemical weapons

The DOD recognized 45 U.S. Army Civilians for their efforts to destroy Syria's declared chemical weapons stockpile at an awards ceremony at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland Oct. 8, 2014. (U.S. Army photo by Conrad Johnson)

The DOD recognized 45 U.S. Army Civilians for their efforts to destroy Syria’s declared chemical weapons stockpile at an awards ceremony at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland Oct. 8, 2014. (U.S. Army photo by Conrad Johnson)

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Oct. 9, 2014) — Department of Defense officials honored 45 Army Civilians in a ceremony Oct. 8 who voluntarily deployed to the Mediterranean Sea to destroy Syria’s declared chemical weapons stockpile.

U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center mission commander Tim Blades got up from his seat and walked across the stage without looking at the handful of DOD stakeholders sitting to his left. He didn’t look out to the nearly 500 friends, families and colleagues sitting offstage to his right either. When he reached the podium, he looked only at the 45 honorees sitting in the front rows.

“I think I’d rather be out at sea,” he said with a laugh. It wasn’t like Blades to feel comfortable in the spotlight. Instead, he directed the attention to the crew of which he said he was simply a part.

Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics Alan Estevez, presented 12 Meritorious Civilian Service Awards and 33 Superior Civilian Service Awards to members of the multi-agency team that completed the historic mission.

“Today’s ceremony is an example of how science and technology, combined with a world-class workforce and the great teamwork of all you players out there, can deliver unique capabilities to our nation,” said Maj. Gen. John F. Wharton, commanding general of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command. “To me, it’s another great example of rapid acquisition process to meet the operational needs of our nation.”

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Chemical-biological researchers deliver results

Edgewood Chemical Biological Center engineers fielded the next-generation M50 mask to U.S. Soldiers stationed in Japan and Korea.

Edgewood Chemical Biological Center engineers fielded the next-generation M50 mask to U.S. Soldiers stationed in Japan and Korea.

Soldiers stay lethal in any environment

ECBC Public Affairs

Choking, watering eyes, blistering skin and convulsions are symptoms of imminent death from a chemical weapons attack. The lethality of such attacks, most recently in August 2013 in Syria, sends tremors across the globe.

For Soldiers, chemical weapons present a real danger on the battlefield that requires advanced technology to keep them safe. The Army is investing in science and technology to enable Soldiers to operate in a chemical-biological threat environment.

Scientists and researchers at the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center work to provide better protective equipment, such as the iconic protective mask. As threats evolve, ECBC engineers fielded the next-generation M50 mask to Soldiers stationed in Japan and Korea. The Army is fielding more than 1 million of these masks across the Department of Defense.

“I noticed the difference between the M50 and the old M40 mask as soon as I put it on,” said Sgt. James Tuthill, a training noncommissioned officer stationed at the Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C. “I train Marines to be prepared for chemical, biological and radiological hot zones, and this mask provides them with better visibility, easier breathing and greater comfort wearing it. On top of all that, it just looks cool.”

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Army scientists work to destroy chemical weapons

From left to right: Jeff Gonce - Chief, Field Maintenance Branch, Anna Kirby - Chemical Engineering Technician, Frank Reinsfelder - Chemical Engineering Technician, Ann Brozena - Research Chemist, Elan Kazam - Mechanical Engineer, Jeff Mott - Chemical Engineering Technician.

From left to right: Jeff Gonce – Chief, Field Maintenance Branch, Anna Kirby – Chemical Engineering Technician, Frank Reinsfelder – Chemical Engineering Technician, Ann Brozena – Research Chemist, Elan Kazam – Mechanical Engineer, Jeff Mott – Chemical Engineering Technician.

ECBC Communications

An Inflection Point in History

Bodies wrapped in white shrouds line the floor of an unknown location in Syria. Shirtless men convulsing and foaming at the mouth have eyes that are open yet unresponsive. A five-year-old boy lay limp in the arms of an older man. It is unclear whether the child is still breathing. The bodies of other children dressed in brightly colored clothing lay lifeless on a white-tiled floor. These were some of the startling images and videos that surfaced in the wake of a chemical weapons attack in Syria on Aug. 21, 2013, killing more than 1,400 people. The event marked an inflection point in global history.

The tremor of this significant tragedy was felt around the world, changing the geopolitical terrain and challenging the connectedness of international relationships. The international community responded with a momentous decision to directly address the chemical weapons attack and the United States offered to work with others like the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons and the United Nations to eliminate the threat from occurring again.

ECBC Innovates in a New Era of Chem-Bio Defense

With an Army known for traditional “boots on the ground” defense, the Department of Defense pivoted its strategy to include a more agile, flexible approach to solve a pressing problem. It called on the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center and other organizations located at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., for inter-disciplinary teamwork that could solve the right problem through corrective framing: a new chemical weapons disposal capability.

“There was a recognition that something was going to happen in Syria, in all likelihood that would require us to do something with those chemical materials that were known to be there,” said Frank Kendall, undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics during a DoD media event on Jan. 2.

ECBC has specialized expertise in chemical demilitarization and field operations. It’s Chemical Biological Application and Risk Reduction Business Unit is comprised of 200 highly trained and experienced scientists, technicians and operators that have been safely conducting chemical demilitarization missions for decades in an environmentally responsible manner, including the successful destruction of chemical agent stockpiles at U.S. site locations and countries around the world.

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Innovation from the inside out

ECBC biologist Crystal Harris works in the Environmental Monitoring Lab, a full-service laboratory for processing a high volume of samples, including soil, liquid, air, wipes, biological tissues and food for chemical or biological warfare material.

ECBC biologist Crystal Harris works in the Environmental Monitoring Lab, a full-service laboratory for processing a high volume of samples, including soil, liquid, air, wipes, biological tissues and food for chemical or biological warfare material. (U.S. Army photo by Conrad Johnson)

Critical mission inspire teamwork, collaboration

ECBC Communications

For nearly 100 years, the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center has served the warfighter with latest protection, detection and decontamination technology and equipment. The evolution of the center, from developing the nation’s first protective mask to producing the technology set to destroy Syria’s chemical weapons stockpile in the coming months, has enabled ECBC to become the premier resource for research, engineering and operations solutions.

In December 2013, ECBC put the future first by investing in applied science proposals through its 219 Innovative Project Program. The program provides a platform for ideas that generates increased business from external customers and create a transition to the warfighter. In fiscal year 2013, the ECBC workforce submitted 34 proposals, nine of which were funded for the first Innovative Project Program.

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Army engineer helps build U.S., Chilean relationships

Jasmine Serlemitsos participated in the U.S. Army's Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program in Santiago, Chile, from September 2012 to July 2013.

Jasmine Serlemitsos participated in the U.S. Army’s Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program in Santiago, Chile, from September 2012 to July 2013.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. – An exchange program participant has expanded the relationships between the U.S. and Chilean scientists and engineers.

Jasmine Serlemitsos, a U.S. Army environmental engineer, said her goal was to strengthen the countries’ connections in science and technology. At the Chilean Army’s Institute of Research and Control, or IDIC, she worked in surveillance for the safe storage of ammunition.

“I focused my goals primarily on building relations between the people in the U.S. who did work in the ammunition side and learning how to do international agreements. [The Chileans] seemed very receptive to that,” said Serlemitsos, who served in Chile from September 2012 to July 2013 as part of the Army’s Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program.

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From Declining Bee Colonies to Bio Pathogens: how ABOid Identifies the Unknown

The Agents of Biological Origin Identifier software has two patents to date, and is capable of providing automated identification of the sample contents from both pure cultures and mixtures of microbes present in culture, environmental or biological matrices.

The Agents of Biological Origin Identifier software has two patents to date, and is capable of providing automated identification of the sample contents from both pure cultures and mixtures of microbes present in culture, environmental or biological matrices.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Scientists began noticing a drastic decline of bee colonies with no known cause in 2007. Many studies said that this decline of bees may put the country at risk of a food disaster. What few likely know is that a team of scientists at the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center utilized its own software to detect that a combination of both a virus and a fungi was the likely culprit.

Scientists with ECBC’s Research & Technology Directorate’s Point Detection Branch continue to enhance and expand this novel software suite of bioinformatics algorithms, which is capable of identifying biological microbes in various backgrounds without any prior knowledge of the sample. Utilizing data from a mass spectrometry-based proteomics system, the team can run any tandem mass spectral data through the software to provide statistical validation of its identity.

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Polish scientists, U.S. Army researchers discuss partnerships

Lester Hitch (left), an engineering technician for the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center's Rapid Technologies Branch, explains additive manufacturing to a group of Polish scientists at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Oct. 2. (U.S. Army photo by Crystal Maynard)

Lester Hitch (left), an engineering technician for the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center’s Rapid Technologies Branch, explains additive manufacturing to a group of Polish scientists at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Oct. 2. (U.S. Army photo by Crystal Maynard)

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Oct. 10, 2013) — A group of Polish scientists traveled to U.S. Army research centers Oct. 2-3 to learn about America’s expertise in robotics and explore potential partnerships.

The delegation, led by retired Col. Jozef Wrona, of 15 scientists from Polish academia and industry will advise their government on advancing the country’s robotics program.

Dale A. Ormond, director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, discussed his organization’s global footprint and emphasized reaching into the international scientific community for technological solutions.

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Army, academia develop human-on-a-chip technology

Crystal Randall, an Army microbiologist on ECBC's in vitro research team, conducts laboratory research. (U.S. Army photo by Conrad Johnson)

Crystal Randall, an Army microbiologist on ECBC’s in vitro research team, conducts laboratory research. (U.S. Army photo by Conrad Johnson)

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Sept. 26, 2013) — There was a time when the thought of manufacturing organs in the laboratory was science fiction, but now that science is a reality.

Army Scientists at the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center and academia collaborators have been conducting research of “organs” on microchips. ECBC is one of a few laboratories in the world conducting this research effort, but what sets ECBC apart is that its research will directly impact the warfighter.

The center houses the only laboratories in the United States that the Chemical Weapons Convention permits to produce chemical warfare agent for testing purposes. ECBC will test the human-on-a-chip against chemical warfare agent to learn more about how the body will respond to agent exposure and explore various treatment options for exposures.

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Exchange program with Australia focuses on U.S. Army’s chemical protection

Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program participant Steve Carrig and co-worker Julia Freeman operate Chemical Articulated Test Manikin, known as CARTMAN, in the Australian Defense Science and Technology Office's Environmental Test Facility in Melbourne, Australia.

Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program participant Steve Carrig and co-worker Julia Freeman operate Chemical Articulated Test Manikin, known as CARTMAN, in the Australian Defense Science and Technology Office’s Environmental Test Facility in Melbourne, Australia.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Sept. 20, 2013) — Spending two years immersed in the Australian defense science and technology community provided new perspectives for a U.S. Army engineer.

Steve Carrig said his work with the Australian military allowed tremendous access to end users — Soldiers — because of the country’s smaller size.

“Having the chance to work with Soldiers on a more routine basis gives you a sense of who you’re working for,” said Carrig, who participated in the Army’s Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program from July 2011 to June 2013 at the Defense Science and Technology Office. “Having spent two years in a more closely knit environment really drove it home.

“That’s something that I won’t forget. Even if I’m sitting here in an office every day, managing things from afar, it reminds me that’s what I’m doing.”

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Army chemical lab earns top grade in proficiency test

ECBC's Forensic Analytical Center was the first U.S. laboratory to become a designated OPCW laboratory. They were given that status by the Director General of the OPCW in 1996. Although testing takes place on an annual basis, the total process takes place in a three-year timeframe. In order to maintain OPCW accreditation, laboratories must maintain a three-year rolling average of at least two

ECBC’s Forensic Analytical Center was the first U.S. laboratory to become a designated OPCW laboratory. They were given that status by the Director General of the OPCW in 1996. Although testing takes place on an annual basis, the total process takes place in a three-year timeframe. In order to maintain OPCW accreditation, laboratories must maintain a three-year rolling average of at least two “As” and one “B.”

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Sept. 9, 2013) — The U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center’s Forensic Analytical Center continues to be a pioneer in the area of forensic analysis for monitoring the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, as well as analysis of samples associated with possible terrorist attacks or breaches of security.

The Treaty Laboratory at ECBC received an “A” grade in the latest international proficiency test (33rd OPCW IPT). Of the 12 labs worldwide that participated in the test, only two received an “A,” and two laboratories received a “B,” the minimum grade required for a laboratory to maintain their status as a designated laboratory.

The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, an independent organization based in The Hague, The Netherlands, administers the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on their Destruction.

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Cadets work alongside Army chemical and biological experts

West Point Cadets study at ECBC

West Point Cadet Ben Lacey spent part of his summer working on proteomic mass spectrometry in the laboratory at ECBC.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Aug. 7, 2013) — The U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center welcomed cadets from the United States Military Academy at West Point this summer to work on chemical and biological defense projects.

The cadets were taking part in the Academy’s Advanced Individual Academic Development program which provides cadets with an opportunity to observe and implement concepts from their course work over several weeks during the summer months.

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APG unveils center for STEM, education outreach

U.S. Army officials prepare to cut the ribbon of the Aberdeen Proving Ground STEM and Education Outreach Center July 30. From left: Col. Gregory McClinton, APG Garrison commander; Robert Carter, executive technical director of the Army Test and Evaluation Command; Dr. Thomas Russell, director of the Army Research Laboratory; Maj. Gen. Robert Ferrell, commanding general of the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command and APG senior commander; Nicole Racine, a University of Maryland-Baltimore County sophomore; Dale Ormond, director of the Army Research, Development and Engineering Command; Jeffrey Singleton, director of basic research, laboratory management and educational outreach for the assistant secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology; Suzanne Milchling, program integration director of the Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center; and Robert Zanzalari, associate director of the Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center.

 ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Aspiring scientists and engineers are now exploring their future careers at a unified APG facility dedicated to education outreach.

APG ushered in a new era of partnerships in science, technology, engineering and mathematics for northeast Maryland with a ribbon-cutting ceremony July 30.

The APG STEM and Education Outreach Center brings tenant organizations together to pool resources that will enhance students’ experiences in scientific and engineering disciplines. The facility accommodates up to 200 students.

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http://go.usa.gov/jnM4

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RDECOM shows off latest Army technology at Armed Forces Day

Leroy Stitz (left), an engineering assistant with RDECOM's Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, explains advancements in the Army's protective masks to students during Armed Forces Day May 15 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

Leroy Stitz (left), an engineering assistant with RDECOM’s Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, explains advancements in the Army’s protective masks to students during Armed Forces Day May 15 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Local students, military veterans and APG community members inspected and explored the Army’s latest advancements in protective masks, body armor, ballistics protection and renewable energy at Armed Forces Day May 15.

Scientists and engineers of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command displayed their work to unburden, empower and protect Soldiers at the APG-North Recreation Center.

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http://go.usa.gov/TzRH

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Cut-resistant safety gloves lower risk of onsite injury

Since the 2010 ECBC Industrial Incident Evaluation, the number of hand injuries within the organization have decreased significantly.

Since the 2010 ECBC Industrial Incident Evaluation, the number of hand injuries within the organization have decreased significantly.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (June 5, 2013) — Phil Rice tests and replaces critical filter systems at chemical laboratories at the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s chemical and biological center.

Edgewood Chemical Biological Center has adopted new protective equipment for onsite filter maintenance: cut-resistant safety gloves, which dramatically decrease the number of hand injuries.

Rice, a chemical engineering technician, dresses in personnel protective equipment, or PPE, to carry out his important mission. The impermeable Tyvek coveralls, nitrile and butyl glove, tap boots, and the M40 masks are common items to protect against highly toxic chemical contamination threats; however, this type of PPE does not protect against physical hazards, such as the sharp metal edges around the filter units.

“The sharp edges of the stainless steel filters would cut right through a brand new pair of standard butyl gloves that we were using,” Rice said. “The Applications Integration Branch was looking for ways to avoid hand-cutting accidents and decided to have a trial run with the Kevlar gloves.”

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Army team spans globe for science, technology solutions

RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, or RFAST-C, engineers and technicians discuss prototype integration facility capabilities with senior noncommissioned officers from the 18th Engineer Brigade at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, in June 2012.

RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, or RFAST-C, engineers and technicians discuss prototype integration facility capabilities with senior noncommissioned officers from the 18th Engineer Brigade at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, in June 2012.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — U.S. Army science advisors are embedded with major units around the world to speed technology solutions to Soldiers’ needs.

The Field Assistance in Science and Technology program’s 30 science advisors, both uniformed officers and Army civilians, provide a link between Soldiers and the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s thousands of subject matter experts.

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Improved biosurveillance capabilities for U.S. Forces Korea

ECBC is working with the Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical and Biological Defense on the four-year JUPITR project that will begin testing on the Korean peninsula in June.

ECBC is working with the Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical and Biological Defense on the four-year JUPITR project that will begin testing on the Korean peninsula in June.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — A portal, a duel and a kraken that springs to life. No, it’s not the latest science fiction movie. It’s an advanced technology demonstration that’s just getting started.

The Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical and Biological Defense is working with the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s Edgewood Chemical Biological Center to introduce a new advanced technology demonstration- the Joint United States Forces Korea Portal and Integrated Threat Recognition, known as JUPITR.

The goal of the four-year program is to develop unique biological detection capabilities that will address the demand for stronger biosurveillance capabilities in the Korean Peninsula.

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APG to launch centralized STEM education center

Harford County eighth-grade students explore science and engineering as part of the fifth annual Technology Needs Teens program at Harford Community College on May 24, 2012. The Aberdeen Proving Ground STEM Education and Outreach Center will be ready in late May 2013.

Harford County eighth-grade students explore science and engineering as part of the fifth annual Technology Needs Teens program at Harford Community College on May 24, 2012. The Aberdeen Proving Ground STEM Education and Outreach Center will be ready in late May 2013.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Maryland students will soon have a unified APG facility at which to explore the world of science and engineering with Army professionals.

The APG STEM Education and Outreach Center will be ready in late May, said Dr. Sandy Young, an Army Research Laboratory materials engineer. She is coordinating the project with ARL laboratory operations and other science, technology, engineering and mathematics outreach offices on APG.

Young said the SEOC will allow multiple APG tenant organizations to pool their resources to benefit students’ experiences in science and engineering. The facility will accommodate up to 200 students.

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http://go.usa.gov/4u5H

 

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Greater than the sum of its parts

Collectively, we’re the Lucius Fox for the U.S. Army.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Dale Ormond, director of RDECOM, stopped at Picatinny to deliver an important message. Click the link to find out what he had to say.

Click here to read more.

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RDECOM shares contracting opportunities at APBI

Jill Smith, acting deputy director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, discusses RDECOM’s partnerships with industry during the Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry conference at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Dec. 5.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command presented contracting opportunities Dec. 5 as part of APG’s first installation-wide Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry, or APBI, conference.

Jill Smith, RDECOM acting deputy director, provided an overview of the command and discussed how the Army’s research and development community partners with industry during her opening remarks at the Post Theater.

“Across the command, we leverage industry for about 40 percent of applied research funding,” Smith said. “RDECOM partners with industry for about 60 percent of RDECOM’s advanced technology development budget because that process involves integration, and we want industry to be prepared if we proceed to production in quantity.”

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Army scientists improve garbage-to-energy prototype device

With a zero carbon footprint, the improved TGER 2.0 prototype reduces the volume of waste in 30 to one ratio. According to ECBC scientist James Valdes, 30 cubic yards of trash could be reduced to one cubic yard of ash.

With a zero carbon footprint, the improved TGER 2.0 prototype reduces the volume of waste in 30 to one ratio. According to ECBC scientist James Valdes, 30 cubic yards of trash could be reduced to one cubic yard of ash.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The year was 2008 and the on-going war in Iraq was a dangerous landscape for Soldiers on the ground, especially convoys traveling to and from base camps.

Roadside bombs and enemy ambushes were frequent occurrences for U.S. Armed Forces transporting fuel, a risk that may be reduced if camps are equipped with a Tactical Garbage to Energy Refinery prototype.

“If you’re a forward-operating base, you don’t want a local contractor coming in to haul your garbage out because you don’t know if they’re good guys or bad guys,” said Dr. James Valdes, a senior technologist at the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center. “You also don’t want to be hauling fuel in because those convoys are targets and risk the lives of Soldiers and contractors.”

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