Tag Archives: CERDEC

Innovative designs, smart manufacturing deliver Soldier readiness

Gene Curran, senior mechanical engineer, demonstrates the operation of the Lightweight Counter Mortar Radar Live-Fire Test Simulator at Tobyhanna Army Depot. (U.S. Army photo by Kathryn Bailey)

By Kathryn Bailey, CERDEC Command, Power & Directorate

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Dec. 21, 2015) — Army production and logistics is teaming with Army research and development to better streamline the rapid design and fielding of cutting-edge technologies to the Soldier.

“The Army has called for increased innovation, which is shining a spotlight on prototype designs,” said Christopher Manning, Prototype Integration & Testing Division chief, under the Army’s Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, or CERDEC. “However, it is imperative that our designs can be leveraged for mass production and sustainment.”

CERDEC’s Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance, or C4ISR, Prototype Integration Facility, or C4ISR PIF, designs, tests and builds prototypes using an iterative development process. It is teaming with Tobyhanna Army Depot, or TYAD, which is staffed and equipped as the full-rate production and logistics support facility for C4ISR technologies.

Both organizations are under the U.S. Army Materiel Command’s, or AMC’s, subordinate commands — CERDEC is part of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command and TYAD is part of the Communications-Electronics Command. AMC provides materiel readiness across the spectrum of joint operations. Its research, development and engineering centers and depots are critical components of the Army’s organic industrial base. Continue reading

Army e-mentoring program aims to raise STEM graduation rates

Students and mentors meet in person during a meet-and-greet for the CERDEC e-mentoring program at the University of Delaware’s Career Services Center Sept. 21. (U.S. Army photo by Allison Barrow)

Students and mentors meet in person during a meet-and-greet for the CERDEC e-mentoring program at the University of Delaware’s Career Services Center Sept. 21. (U.S. Army photo by Allison Barrow)

By Allison Barrow, CERDEC Public Affairs

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Oct. 28, 2015) College students have a lot of decisions to make: what subject to major in, what concentration to focus on, what internships to apply for, what field they ultimately want to work in, etc.

U.S. Army scientists and engineers are working to make the process a little easier and to increase retention rates among science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, disciplines through a new e-mentoring program.

The U.S. Army’s Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, or CERDEC, program pairs employees with engineering students from the University of Delaware in a year-long e-mentorship in which engineers provide guidance based on their experience as students and professionals in the field. Continue reading

Rucksack may someday power Soldiers’ gear

Pfc. Austin Penwell takes a spin on the treadmill, wearing the Energy Harvesting Backpack. (U.S. Army photo Todd Lopez)

By David Vergun, Army News Service

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. ( Nov. 4, 2015) — A novel attachment to the Soldier’s assault pack might someday reduce the number of batteries carried to power night-vision devices, radios and other equipment, as well as help make dismounted patrols less fatiguing.

Courtney Webster, a biomedical engineer with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, or ARL, is in the middle of testing with her team the prototype Energy Harvesting Backpack at the Soldier Performance and Equipment Advanced Research, or SPEAR, facility here. Continue reading

Early environmental testing quickly pushes equipment to the limit

Wai-mun Leung, CERDEC CP&I engineer, assembles a unit under test to prepare for the Battery Box Violent Vent Simulation Test, located within the CERDEC C4ISR Environmental Test Facility. The test releases high pressure nitrogen into the battery box to simulate a battery rupture, causing a virtually instantaneous spike in pressure. This test ensures the container releases the pressure in a safe, controlled manner without releasing projectiles. (U.S. Army photo by Conrad Johnson)

By Kathryn BaileyCERDEC

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (October 27, 2015) — A U.S. Army environmental test facility provides capabilities to test design integrity, ensure equipment adheres to military specifications and troubleshoot design prototypes to ensure the most comprehensive equipment reaches the warfighter.

Explosive atmospheres, extreme temperature fluctuations and powerful vibrations — these are just some of the punishing environmental conditions military communications equipment must endure on the battlefield or in the sky.

Field survivability tests are an effective means to test the equipment’s functionality and ensure Soldier safety, but Army and industry developers also use environmental test labs as a viable alternative to real-life testing.

“Using a lab to replicate the harshest environmental conditions expedites the testing process at a fraction of the cost,” said Christopher Manning, Command Power & Integration Directorate’s Prototype Integration & Testing Division chief, under the Army’s Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, or CERDEC. Continue reading

Maryland General Assembly, Commerce Department meet Team APG Cyber

CERDEC Director Henry Muller (left), Maryland State Senator James Posapepe, U.S. Army CECOM Commanding General and APG Senior Mission Command Maj. Gen. Bruce T. Crawford, Maryland State Senator William Frick, and CECOM Software Engineering Center Director Larry Muzzelo discuss Team APG’s impact on military cyberspace operations Oct. 19, 2015. (U.S. Army photo by Kristopher Joseph)

By Kristen Kushiyama

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md.(Oct. 22, 2015) — Members of the Maryland General Assembly visited one of the state’s largest employers to meet with Army leaders, tour high-tech laboratories and gain a better understanding of the cyber work conducted here Oct. 19.

The Maryland Joint Committee on Cybersecurity, Information Technology and Biotechnology and representatives from the Maryland Department of Commerce learned about various aspects of the Army’s cyber strategy led by organizations that make up the Aberdeen Proving Ground community known as Team APG, which employs more than 21,000 service members, government civilians and contractors.

Team APG leadership said they are moving forward with mapping the future of the installation’s cyber contributions to the Army to include lifecycle management, system vulnerability analysis, training the current and future military and government workforce, and partnering with industry, academia, international allies, and other government labs to develop future tactical cyber capabilities. Continue reading

AMC commander visits CERDEC sensors, power

Gen. Dennis L. Via, commanding general of the U.S. Army Materiel Command, sees a demonstration on ground combat sensor technologies during a visit to CERDEC Oct. 16. (U.S. Army photo by Julie Goldberg)

CERDEC Public Affairs

FORT BELVOIR, Va. (Oct. 19, 2015) — Gen. Dennis L. Via, commanding general of the U.S. Army Materiel Command, saw the latest in Army night-vision and power technologies for the Army of 2030 and beyond during a visit to the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, or CERDEC, Oct. 16, 2015.

Via received demonstrations that included the evolution of the thermal weapon sight; target handoff with coded spot tracker; third generation forward-looking infrared technologies; infrared cameras for future applications in heads up navigation, tracking and reporting; and multifunction video displays.

Via was pleased by the strides in technology that CERDEC is making to improve technologies and unburden the logistics load on the Soldier, he said. Continue reading

Army-defined open standards pave the way for RF convergence

By Kashia Simmons & Kelly White, CERDEC Public Affairs

MORA provides the fundamental building blocks to enable the future force to dominate the electromagnetic spectrum and to be lighter and more agile in adapting to emerging threats. (U.S. Army illustration)

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (October 20, 2015) — The Army’s first of its kind modular, open system architecture is setting the stage for the future of hardware and software convergence after months of development from the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, or CERDEC.

The Modular Open Radio Frequency Architecture, or MORA, will open radio frequency interfaces to enable rapid insertion of new capabilities and broader interoperability as well as reduce size, weight and power, or SWaP, for future ground vehicles.

“One thing we know about the future is that we don’t know what the future holds,” said Ben Peddicord, chief, CERDECIntelligence and Information Warfare Directorate’s Intel Technology and Architecture Branch. “The interfaces that have been exposed to MORA were chosen based on an analysis of the capabilities we’ve wanted to field over the last 15 years.”

Compared to a traditional radio solution, MORA provides the system integrator with greater flexibility when addressing technical challenges and the ability to insert third-party capabilities.

According to Peddicord, nearly all military platforms — to include Soldiers — have RF devices on them, making MORA an important element of hardware and software convergence because of its ability to share hardware assets across the platform.

Army maximizes efficient fire strikes

Looking at their chest-mounted screens, Soldiers practice accessing the Leader/Soldier Effects Tool Suite during a hands-on demonstration in July on Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey. The three Soldiers are assigned to the Experimental Force, Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment in Fort Benning, Georgia. (U.S. Army photo by Edric Thompson)

Looking at their chest-mounted screens, Soldiers practice accessing the Leader/Soldier Effects Tool Suite during a hands-on demonstration in July on Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey. The three Soldiers are assigned to the Experimental Force, Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment at Fort Benning, Georgia. (U.S. Army photo by Edric Thompson)

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (Sept. 8, 2015) — Crouched on the desert floor, a Soldier watches an enemy vehicle rolling in the distance and gauges its range to her platoon. However, when she’s calculated the distance, rather than radio her platoon leader, the Soldier grabs her phone and relays the information with a software system called the Leader/Soldier Effects Tool Suite.

The tool suite, also known as LETS, is designed to provide the dismounted Soldier the capability to plan, coordinate and execute fires quickly and efficiently.

LETS functions on hand-held devices, such as mobile phones, and vehicle platforms. Its users can share firing details including range assessment, battle damage assessment, weapon emplacement, and control measures.

Read more …

Two-for-one device houses right radio at right time

Matthew Johnson, Communications- Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center  engineering technician, uses computer-aided manufacturing machining software program to simulate the universal radio mount build before the actual build. (U.S. Army photo by Kathryn Bailey)

Matthew Johnson, Communications- Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center engineering technician, uses computer-aided manufacturing machining software program to simulate the universal radio mount build before the actual build. (U.S. Army photo by Kathryn Bailey)

By Kathryn Bailey, CERDEC CPI Directorate

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Aug. 12, 2015) — A little innovation can go a long way towards helping U.S. military forces successfully facilitate their missions. Even an apparatus no bigger than a breadbox recently solved a challenge involving two radios and the need to make their transport lighter. 

The U.S. Special Operations Command, or SOCOM, required a solution that would allow its forces to mount AN/PRC 117G and Rover 6 radios to a vehicle, yet still conform to strict size and weight limitations. Both radios performed key functions, yet both were not always needed on each mission. 

“Instead of designing two separate radio mounts, our engineers created a universal two-radio mount design that swivels to expose two separate mounting brackets,” said James Shannon, the project’s lead for the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, or CERDEC. 

The center’s Command, Power and Integration, or CP&I, Directorate led the effort for CERDEC and leveraged its Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance, or C4ISR Prototype Integration Facility, or PIF, to complete the requirements. 

Read more …

New flight center takes off

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contruct Flight Activity Center in Lakehurst, New Jersey. (U.S. Army photo)

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contruct Flight Activity Center in Lakehurst, New Jersey. (U.S. Army photo)

By JoAnne Castagna, Ed.D.

In the skies somewhere above the Middle East, several Black Hawk helicopters hover. Their doors open and American service members exit and swiftly descend by rope to the ground.  They move in on high value targets of interest and confiscate their weapons, ammunition and intel.

What helped to make this mission a success was the fast rope system installed on the Black Hawks by the Flight Activity Center that is part of the U.S. Army Communications Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, or CERDEC, in Lakehurst, New Jersey.

In order for the center to continue to create these much needed technologies, they realized they had to upgrade their facilities to match the challenges being presented during their missions. As a result, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District is constructing a new energy-efficient multi-purpose complex that will help the center to continue their important mission while at the same time save the base and taxpayers considerable money.

Continue reading

Army looks at the future of aircraft survivability

Mark Calafut works for the Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate of the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. (U.S. Army photo by Conrad Johnson)

Mark Calafut works for the Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate of the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. (U.S. Army photo by Conrad Johnson)

By Mark Calafut, CERDEC

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The interconnected world of electronic systems provides an opportunity and a challenge for Army Aviation. As the Army develops its next-generation survivability systems, it has the opportunity to cost-effectively leverage advanced commercial electronics and integration technologies. However, it also faces the challenge of maintaining its technological edge, because many of those same commercial electronics are available to potential adversaries.

Today, Army aircraft are protected by a collection of survivability technologies, including onboard electronic survivability systems. Each onboard survivability system is designed to be independently effective at detecting or defeating a specific class of weapon systems, such as electro-optic and radio-frequency guided missiles or ballistic munitions. When adversaries employ these weapon systems against Army aircraft, the appropriate onboard survivability system automatically detects and defeats the threat, protecting the aircraft and crew.

Historically, onboard survivability systems were designed and developed independently. As technology matured and new weapon systems emerged, the Army upgraded existing survivability systems, or in some cases, added entirely new survivability systems to the aircraft. Instead of a truly integrated survivability suite, the result is a piecemeal approach whereby modern aircraft are protected by a collection of proprietary systems, often developed by different contractors and generally not built with open architectures that would much more readily enable their interoperability.

This presents disadvantages. Although many onboard systems require common components, the independent design and development of the systems prevents components from being centralized and shared. The independent designs came from systems not developed from a systems-of-systems approach with an open standard that established a technical vision for interoperable systems.

In many cases, this leads to duplication of components, such as processors or displays that would be unnecessary if the systems were integrated. However, the present lack of integration also prevents onboard systems from communicating with one another and operating cooperatively, which limits reliability and adaptability. For example, if a single protection system fails or is destroyed, the other onboard systems cannot intelligently compensate for that loss.

Continue reading

New hangar to increase C4ISR-aviation capabilities

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District Army is overseeing the construction of a 107,000 square foot hangar by Pennsylvania-based Bedwell Company at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakhurst in New Jersey. Elements of the U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC will occupy the engineering hangar that will aid in the support of aviation related projects for the advancement of C4ISR technologies in the spring of 2016.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District Army is overseeing the construction of a 107,000 square foot hangar by Pennsylvania-based Bedwell Company at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakhurst in New Jersey. Elements of the U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC will occupy the engineering hangar that will aid in the support of aviation related projects for the advancement of C4ISR technologies in the spring of 2016.

By Kristen Kushiyama, CERDEC Public Affairs

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (March 9, 2015) — Elements of the U.S. Army will complete and occupy a state-of-the-art research, development and engineering hangar in less than a year that will aid in the support of aviation related projects for the advancement of Command, Control, Computers and Communications and Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance, known as C4ISR, technologies.

By Spring 2016, elements of the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center are scheduled to move into the 107,000 square foot facility at the Lakehurst Naval Air Station portion of Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in New Jersey.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District Army is overseeing the construction by Pennsylvania-based Bedwell Company.

The hangar will supplement a World War II hangar that has degraded over time and will no longer sufficiently support the mission of the CERDEC Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate Flight Activity, which will occupy both the current and new hangar spaces for the near future.

Continue reading

Night turns into day: Army researchers enable night lethality

In complete dark from significant standoff, Soldiers use medium wave infrared, or MWIR, technology to turn night into day. (U.S. Army photo)

In complete dark from significant standoff, Soldiers use medium wave infrared, or MWIR, technology to turn night into day. (U.S. Army photo)

By Kim Bell, CERDEC NVESD Public Affairs

In science fiction, technology problems are solved with the stroke of a writer’s pen. In reality, science and technology research takes time and a lot of effort.

“If you’ve seen the movie Predator, you’ve seen a perfect illustration of the process of lethality,” said Dr. Don Reago, director of the Night Vision Electronics Sensors Directorate of the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center at Fort Belvoir, Va. “First, you must identify your target and if in fact it is a target, then you can move in and eliminate the threat.”

In the movie, the predator identifies targets using thermal technology and deducing whether or not they are carrying weapons.

“If potential targets were unarmed they went unharmed, much like how our warfighters operate at present,” Reago said. “Today, the Army’s goal is to improve situational awareness for Soldiers, resulting in increased survivability, decreased civilian casualties and accurate lethality when necessary.”

At NVESD, Army researchers are developing sensors, like the thermal sensors from Predator, as well as image intensification.

Continue reading

Unified Lab for Tactical Radios

(From left) Gary Martin, acting director, Communications Electronics Command (CECOM); Brig. Gen. Daniel P. Hughes, program executive officer for Command, Control and Communications-Tactical (PEO C3T); and Dr. Paul Zablocky, director, Space and Terrestrial Communications Directorate (S&TCD), Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC), cut the ribbon on the Unified Laboratory for Tactical Radios-Army Jan. 7, 2014. The new lab will combine research and development, sustainment and acquisition efforts for the Army’s radio portfolio in a single location.

(From left) Gary Martin, acting director, Communications Electronics Command; Brig. Gen. Daniel P. Hughes, program executive officer for Command, Control and Communications-Tactical; and Dr. Paul Zablocky, director, Space and Terrestrial Communications Directorate, Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, cut the ribbon on the Unified Laboratory for Tactical Radios-Army Jan. 7, 2014. The new lab will combine research and development, sustainment and acquisition efforts for the Army’s radio portfolio
in a single location.

Tactical radio research promises new advances

By Argie Sarantinos-Perrin, PEO C3T

The Army formed the new Unified Lab for Tactical Radios – Army, known as ULTRA, to combine research, development, sustainment and acquisition efforts for the Army’s radio portfolio in a single location.

The new facility combines U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command, Program Executive Office C3T and Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center personnel and resources to provide economies of scale and better coordination of radio technologies throughout their lifecycle, officials said.

A Jan. 7, 2014, ribbon-cutting ceremony for the ULTRA facility, which is located on the C4ISR campus at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., officially inaugurated an effort to support the full lifecycle of Army radios, from research and development, to procurement and management, to sustainment.

Continue reading

Field support training takes on a system-of-systems approach

CERDEC and PEO C3T engineers supporting the assessment were instrumental in identifying and helping to resolve issues with the CS 13 network architecture and providing recommendations on techniques and procedures for successful deployment and operation of CS 13 equipment and network.

CERDEC and PEO C3T engineers supporting the assessment were instrumental in identifying and helping to resolve issues with the CS 13 network architecture and providing recommendations on techniques and procedures for successful deployment and operation of CS 13 equipment and network. (U.S. Army photo)

Training and preparing for Capability Set 13

By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest, PEO C3T and Edric Thompson, CERDEC Public Affairs

As the first units recently prepared for deployment with an array of new communications technologies, the Army’s acquisition and research and development communities teamed up to train a new breed of “super” engineers to support these advanced capabilities.

The Program Executive Office Command Control and Communications-Tactical and the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center used a combination of classroom instruction, research facility exercises and hands-on experience to prepare more than 30 engineers to support and troubleshoot an integrated package of tactical communications systems the Army fielded to select brigade combat teams known as Capability Set 13. The team also trained units on how to configure, employ and maintain it.

The brigade combat teams using CS 13 have deployed or are preparing to deploy to Afghanistan. CS 13 spans from the tactical operations center to the dismounted Soldier, providing mobile satellite and robust radio capability so commanders and Soldiers can take the network with them anywhere on the battlefield. It allows deployed units to cover increased distance while expediting decision-making and information sharing across more echelons than was previously possible in today’s operational force.

Continue reading

Army, Maryland schools turn students into ‘STEM Superstars’

Lisby Elementary, Aberdeen, MD, fourth-grade teacher Dan McGonigal looks on as his students explain their 'Bad Hair Day Fixer' prototype during the CERDEC-led STEM Superstar program, which engages students from first through fifth grade in stimulating activities challenging students to think creatively and solve problems like an engineer.

Lisby Elementary, Aberdeen, MD, fourth-grade teacher Dan McGonigal looks on as his students explain their ‘Bad Hair Day Fixer’ prototype during the CERDEC-led STEM Superstar program, which engages students from first through fifth grade in stimulating activities challenging students to think creatively and solve problems like an engineer. (U.S. Army photo by Amanda Rominiecki)

By Amanda Rominiecki, CERDEC Public Affairs

During its second full academic year, the STEM Superstar program continues to bring science, technology, engineering and mathematics to elementary students around Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

The U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center created the STEM Superstar program to engage Harford and Cecil County students from first through fifth grade in stimulating activities challenging students to think creatively and solve problems like an engineer.

Continue reading

U.S. Army, Australian leaders talk research, development cooperation

Dale A. Ormond (right), director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, discusses his organization with Dr. Alex Zelinsky, Australia’s chief defense scientist, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Jan. 27.

Dale A. Ormond (right), director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, discusses his organization with Dr. Alex Zelinsky, Australia’s chief defense scientist, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Jan. 27.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Jan. 28, 2014) — Australia’s chief defense scientist met with U.S. Army leaders Jan. 27 to explore opportunities for research and development partnerships.

The U.S. Army’s engagement with foreign partners in fostering science and engineering is essential to ensuring that Soldiers, as well as American allies, have access to the world’s best technology, said Dale A. Ormond, director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command.

“We are trying to expand our international outreach,” Ormond said. “Seventy percent of the money spent worldwide on science and technology is outside the U.S. There are great scientists and engineers everywhere. [It’s important to] go find out who they are and work with them.”

Read more: http://go.usa.gov/BC6w

RDECOM demonstrates advances in Army power, energy at Pentagon

Katherine Hammack (left), assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, talks with Robert Berlin, a mechanical engineer with RDECOM's Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, in the Pentagon Courtyard Nov. 14.

Katherine Hammack (left), assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, talks with Robert Berlin, a mechanical engineer with RDECOM’s Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, in the Pentagon Courtyard Nov. 14.

WASHINGTON (Nov. 14, 2013) — The U.S. Army showcased how its research and engineering centers are enabling advances in operational energy for Soldiers Nov. 14 at the Pentagon.

Subject matter experts from across the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command discussed their work in technologies that included Soldier-borne electronics, ground-vehicle fuel efficiency and sustainable base camps.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/WPam

Army bolsters nation’s cybersecurity through STEM outreach

During the "Network and Cyber" week, students first learned about the complexities of computer networks and the steps required for a single e-mail to be sent. In this activity, more than 30 students each represented a step that an e-mail must take to go from one network to another as they sent a message across the classroom. The Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences course took place in July 2013 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

During the “Network and Cyber” week, students first learned about the complexities of computer networks and the steps required for a single e-mail to be sent. In this activity, more than 30 students each represented a step that an e-mail must take to go from one network to another as they sent a message across the classroom. The Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences course took place in July 2013 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Computer networks face persistent cyber threats from the nation’s adversaries. The future defenders of cyberspace, America’s students, honed their skills this summer as they learned from U.S. Army scientists and engineers who are experts in the field.

Cybersecurity practitioners from across the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command joined forces to spark an interest and share their knowledge with high-school students as part of the Army Educational Outreach Program at APG.

Two RDECOM organizations — Army Research Laboratory and the Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center — partnered to develop and deliver two Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences cyber programs in July.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/WrFC

‘Greening’ brings fresh perspectives for Army scientists, engineers

J.J. Kowal (left) and Walt Rada sit inside a LUH-72 Lakota at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Sept. 25.

J.J. Kowal (left) and Walt Rada sit inside a LUH-72 Lakota at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Sept. 25.

GUNPOWDER MILITARY RESERVATION, Md. — Thirty U.S. Army civilians now have a greater appreciation and understanding of the rigors and challenges associated with Soldier tasks.

Five days of intense training provided first-hand experience of the technical and physical demands on Soldiers.

Maj. Shane Sims, a military deputy at the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s communications and electronics center, led a Greening Course for the civilians from Aberdeen Proving Ground. One of his goals was for participants to think like Soldiers during the training rotations.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/DtAj