Posts Tagged CERDEC

Unified Lab for Tactical Radios

(From left) Gary Martin, acting director, Communications Electronics Command (CECOM); Brig. Gen. Daniel P. Hughes, program executive officer for Command, Control and Communications-Tactical (PEO C3T); and Dr. Paul Zablocky, director, Space and Terrestrial Communications Directorate (S&TCD), Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC), cut the ribbon on the Unified Laboratory for Tactical Radios-Army Jan. 7, 2014. The new lab will combine research and development, sustainment and acquisition efforts for the Army’s radio portfolio in a single location.

(From left) Gary Martin, acting director, Communications Electronics Command; Brig. Gen. Daniel P. Hughes, program executive officer for Command, Control and Communications-Tactical; and Dr. Paul Zablocky, director, Space and Terrestrial Communications Directorate, Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, cut the ribbon on the Unified Laboratory for Tactical Radios-Army Jan. 7, 2014. The new lab will combine research and development, sustainment and acquisition efforts for the Army’s radio portfolio
in a single location.

Tactical radio research promises new advances

By Argie Sarantinos-Perrin, PEO C3T

The Army formed the new Unified Lab for Tactical Radios – Army, known as ULTRA, to combine research, development, sustainment and acquisition efforts for the Army’s radio portfolio in a single location.

The new facility combines U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command, Program Executive Office C3T and Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center personnel and resources to provide economies of scale and better coordination of radio technologies throughout their lifecycle, officials said.

A Jan. 7, 2014, ribbon-cutting ceremony for the ULTRA facility, which is located on the C4ISR campus at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., officially inaugurated an effort to support the full lifecycle of Army radios, from research and development, to procurement and management, to sustainment.

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Field support training takes on a system-of-systems approach

CERDEC and PEO C3T engineers supporting the assessment were instrumental in identifying and helping to resolve issues with the CS 13 network architecture and providing recommendations on techniques and procedures for successful deployment and operation of CS 13 equipment and network.

CERDEC and PEO C3T engineers supporting the assessment were instrumental in identifying and helping to resolve issues with the CS 13 network architecture and providing recommendations on techniques and procedures for successful deployment and operation of CS 13 equipment and network. (U.S. Army photo)

Training and preparing for Capability Set 13

By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest, PEO C3T and Edric Thompson, CERDEC Public Affairs

As the first units recently prepared for deployment with an array of new communications technologies, the Army’s acquisition and research and development communities teamed up to train a new breed of “super” engineers to support these advanced capabilities.

The Program Executive Office Command Control and Communications-Tactical and the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center used a combination of classroom instruction, research facility exercises and hands-on experience to prepare more than 30 engineers to support and troubleshoot an integrated package of tactical communications systems the Army fielded to select brigade combat teams known as Capability Set 13. The team also trained units on how to configure, employ and maintain it.

The brigade combat teams using CS 13 have deployed or are preparing to deploy to Afghanistan. CS 13 spans from the tactical operations center to the dismounted Soldier, providing mobile satellite and robust radio capability so commanders and Soldiers can take the network with them anywhere on the battlefield. It allows deployed units to cover increased distance while expediting decision-making and information sharing across more echelons than was previously possible in today’s operational force.

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Army, Maryland schools turn students into ‘STEM Superstars’

Lisby Elementary, Aberdeen, MD, fourth-grade teacher Dan McGonigal looks on as his students explain their 'Bad Hair Day Fixer' prototype during the CERDEC-led STEM Superstar program, which engages students from first through fifth grade in stimulating activities challenging students to think creatively and solve problems like an engineer.

Lisby Elementary, Aberdeen, MD, fourth-grade teacher Dan McGonigal looks on as his students explain their ‘Bad Hair Day Fixer’ prototype during the CERDEC-led STEM Superstar program, which engages students from first through fifth grade in stimulating activities challenging students to think creatively and solve problems like an engineer. (U.S. Army photo by Amanda Rominiecki)

By Amanda Rominiecki, CERDEC Public Affairs

During its second full academic year, the STEM Superstar program continues to bring science, technology, engineering and mathematics to elementary students around Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

The U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center created the STEM Superstar program to engage Harford and Cecil County students from first through fifth grade in stimulating activities challenging students to think creatively and solve problems like an engineer.

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U.S. Army, Australian leaders talk research, development cooperation

Dale A. Ormond (right), director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, discusses his organization with Dr. Alex Zelinsky, Australia’s chief defense scientist, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Jan. 27.

Dale A. Ormond (right), director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, discusses his organization with Dr. Alex Zelinsky, Australia’s chief defense scientist, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Jan. 27.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Jan. 28, 2014) — Australia’s chief defense scientist met with U.S. Army leaders Jan. 27 to explore opportunities for research and development partnerships.

The U.S. Army’s engagement with foreign partners in fostering science and engineering is essential to ensuring that Soldiers, as well as American allies, have access to the world’s best technology, said Dale A. Ormond, director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command.

“We are trying to expand our international outreach,” Ormond said. “Seventy percent of the money spent worldwide on science and technology is outside the U.S. There are great scientists and engineers everywhere. [It's important to] go find out who they are and work with them.”

Read more: http://go.usa.gov/BC6w

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RDECOM demonstrates advances in Army power, energy at Pentagon

Katherine Hammack (left), assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, talks with Robert Berlin, a mechanical engineer with RDECOM's Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, in the Pentagon Courtyard Nov. 14.

Katherine Hammack (left), assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, talks with Robert Berlin, a mechanical engineer with RDECOM’s Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, in the Pentagon Courtyard Nov. 14.

WASHINGTON (Nov. 14, 2013) — The U.S. Army showcased how its research and engineering centers are enabling advances in operational energy for Soldiers Nov. 14 at the Pentagon.

Subject matter experts from across the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command discussed their work in technologies that included Soldier-borne electronics, ground-vehicle fuel efficiency and sustainable base camps.

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http://go.usa.gov/WPam

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Army bolsters nation’s cybersecurity through STEM outreach

During the "Network and Cyber" week, students first learned about the complexities of computer networks and the steps required for a single e-mail to be sent. In this activity, more than 30 students each represented a step that an e-mail must take to go from one network to another as they sent a message across the classroom. The Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences course took place in July 2013 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

During the “Network and Cyber” week, students first learned about the complexities of computer networks and the steps required for a single e-mail to be sent. In this activity, more than 30 students each represented a step that an e-mail must take to go from one network to another as they sent a message across the classroom. The Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences course took place in July 2013 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Computer networks face persistent cyber threats from the nation’s adversaries. The future defenders of cyberspace, America’s students, honed their skills this summer as they learned from U.S. Army scientists and engineers who are experts in the field.

Cybersecurity practitioners from across the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command joined forces to spark an interest and share their knowledge with high-school students as part of the Army Educational Outreach Program at APG.

Two RDECOM organizations — Army Research Laboratory and the Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center — partnered to develop and deliver two Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences cyber programs in July.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/WrFC

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‘Greening’ brings fresh perspectives for Army scientists, engineers

J.J. Kowal (left) and Walt Rada sit inside a LUH-72 Lakota at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Sept. 25.

J.J. Kowal (left) and Walt Rada sit inside a LUH-72 Lakota at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Sept. 25.

GUNPOWDER MILITARY RESERVATION, Md. — Thirty U.S. Army civilians now have a greater appreciation and understanding of the rigors and challenges associated with Soldier tasks.

Five days of intense training provided first-hand experience of the technical and physical demands on Soldiers.

Maj. Shane Sims, a military deputy at the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s communications and electronics center, led a Greening Course for the civilians from Aberdeen Proving Ground. One of his goals was for participants to think like Soldiers during the training rotations.

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http://go.usa.gov/DtAj

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Army scientist advances biometrics through UK exchange program

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, participated in the Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program from August 2011 to July 2013. He worked at the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory's Sensors and Countermeasures Department.

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, participated in the Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program from August 2011 to July 2013. He worked at the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory’s Sensors and Countermeasures Department.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Oct. 23, 2013) — British and U.S. Army researchers are partnering to enhance biometric and surveillance capabilities as the result of an exchange program between the countries.

Dr. Kevin Leonard, a U.S. Army physicist, focused on advancing facial-recognition technologies during his two-year assignment in the United Kingdom.

“How far can we look and see who someone is? How can we help our Soldiers see better and farther?” said Leonard, who was assigned to the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory in Salisbury.

Leonard said he wanted to better understand how different countries approach similar scientific topics. When the DSTL chief executive visited Leonard’s organization to talk about possible collaborations, an area of mutual interest was biometrics. The discussions piqued Leonard’s interest.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/W3kG

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Signal Soldier “associate” provides real-time network diagnostics

The S-6 Associate software developed by CERDEC S&TCD aims to simplify building and monitoring the tactical network, diagnosing and addressing problems and ensuring each Soldier remains connected during critical moments. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Nathan Goodall)

The S-6 Associate software developed by CERDEC S&TCD aims to simplify building and monitoring the tactical network, diagnosing and addressing problems and ensuring each Soldier remains connected during critical moments. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Nathan Goodall)

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Sept. 19, 2013) — As the number of electronic devices on the battlefield grows, so does the challenge of managing the network that links them together. Army researchers continue to work to create a better way to build and monitor the tactical network, diagnose and address problems, and ensure each Soldier remains connected during critical moments.

Engineers from the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s communications-electronics center, or CERDEC, are developing software called S-6 Associate that will consolidate existing information, simplify network monitoring and better equip the network operations staff officer, commonly known as the S-6.

The software enhances already fielded systems like the battlefield network Warfighter Information Network — Tactical, known as WIN-T, Command Post of the Future mission command system, network management systems and Visio, the network image building program, said Josip Pilipovic, CERDEC Space & Terrestrial Communications Directorate lead scientist for the S-6 Associate project.

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APG unveils center for STEM, education outreach

U.S. Army officials prepare to cut the ribbon of the Aberdeen Proving Ground STEM and Education Outreach Center July 30. From left: Col. Gregory McClinton, APG Garrison commander; Robert Carter, executive technical director of the Army Test and Evaluation Command; Dr. Thomas Russell, director of the Army Research Laboratory; Maj. Gen. Robert Ferrell, commanding general of the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command and APG senior commander; Nicole Racine, a University of Maryland-Baltimore County sophomore; Dale Ormond, director of the Army Research, Development and Engineering Command; Jeffrey Singleton, director of basic research, laboratory management and educational outreach for the assistant secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology; Suzanne Milchling, program integration director of the Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center; and Robert Zanzalari, associate director of the Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center.

 ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Aspiring scientists and engineers are now exploring their future careers at a unified APG facility dedicated to education outreach.

APG ushered in a new era of partnerships in science, technology, engineering and mathematics for northeast Maryland with a ribbon-cutting ceremony July 30.

The APG STEM and Education Outreach Center brings tenant organizations together to pool resources that will enhance students’ experiences in scientific and engineering disciplines. The facility accommodates up to 200 students.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/jnM4

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Conformal battery unburdens Army’s networked Soldiers

 

The Conformal Wearable Battery, which is shown being placed into a tactical vest, is flexible and conforms to the body. It provides more power, reduces the need for battery re-charging and spares, and serves as a single source of power for all worn electronic devices.

The Conformal Wearable Battery, which is shown being placed into a tactical vest, is flexible and conforms to the body. It provides more power, reduces the need for battery re-charging and spares, and serves as a single source of power for all worn electronic devices.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army is developing a battery to improve Soldiers’ agility on the battlefield while meeting the demands of an increased power burden stemming from new networked electronic devices.

The Conformal Wearable Battery is flexible and integrates into a Soldier’s body armor. It conforms to the body, which Army officials say is a significant upgrade to traditional batteries that are rectangular and bulky.

The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command and Program Executive Office Soldier have partnered to fulfill the requirements of today’s networked Soldier with the CWB.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/j4yw

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RDECOM shows off latest Army technology at Armed Forces Day

Leroy Stitz (left), an engineering assistant with RDECOM's Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, explains advancements in the Army's protective masks to students during Armed Forces Day May 15 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

Leroy Stitz (left), an engineering assistant with RDECOM’s Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, explains advancements in the Army’s protective masks to students during Armed Forces Day May 15 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Local students, military veterans and APG community members inspected and explored the Army’s latest advancements in protective masks, body armor, ballistics protection and renewable energy at Armed Forces Day May 15.

Scientists and engineers of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command displayed their work to unburden, empower and protect Soldiers at the APG-North Recreation Center.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/TzRH

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Demining efforts improve technology and safety of Thai borders

Mini MineWolf is a remote controlled earth tilling system capable of clearing mines that target both humans and vehicles and are buried in the ground to a depth of 25cm, or just under 10 inches. CERDEC NVESD HD R&D partnered with the Thailand Mine Action Center, or TMAC, for an operational field evaluation of the Mini MineWolf mine clearing system in an effort to remove mines along Thai borders.

Mini MineWolf is a remote controlled earth tilling system capable of clearing mines that target both humans and vehicles and are buried in the ground to a depth of 25cm, or just under 10 inches. CERDEC NVESD HD R&D partnered with the Thailand Mine Action Center, or TMAC, for an operational field evaluation of the Mini MineWolf mine clearing system in an effort to remove mines along Thai borders.

FORT BELVOIR, Va. (May 13, 2013) — Landmines and unexploded ordnance are found throughout the world, often in peaceful countries leftover from conflict decades ago.

Researchers from the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s communications-electronics center, or CERDEC, continued global humanitarian demining efforts, including a new yearlong project aimed to improve demining technology and increase border safety in Thailand that began March 29.

Members of CERDEC Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate, or NVESD, partnered with the Thailand Mine Action Center, or TMAC, for an operational field evaluation of the Mini MineWolf mine-clearing system to remove mines along Thailand’s borders.

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Army team spans globe for science, technology solutions

RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, or RFAST-C, engineers and technicians discuss prototype integration facility capabilities with senior noncommissioned officers from the 18th Engineer Brigade at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, in June 2012.

RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, or RFAST-C, engineers and technicians discuss prototype integration facility capabilities with senior noncommissioned officers from the 18th Engineer Brigade at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, in June 2012.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — U.S. Army science advisors are embedded with major units around the world to speed technology solutions to Soldiers’ needs.

The Field Assistance in Science and Technology program’s 30 science advisors, both uniformed officers and Army civilians, provide a link between Soldiers and the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s thousands of subject matter experts.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/T9Gd

 

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Civilian engineering team secures Soldiers’ compound in Afghanistan

Members of the 1st Squadron, 9th U.S. Cavalry Regiment, known as the 1-9 Cav, (left) stand in formation Feb. 25 during a ceremony at Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan, in which certificates of appreciation were presented to four RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center personnel (right) who engineered, fabricated and installed force-protection enhancements at a combat outpost. RFAST-C members (from left): engineer Steve Roberts, equipment operator Jon-Luke DeStefano, engineering technician Robert Spetla, and executive officer Dan McGauley.

American Soldiers in Afghanistan were recently challenged in securing a facility for coalition forces. They turned to deployed U.S. Army civilian engineers for a solution.

Soldiers from the 1st Squadron, 9th U.S. Cavalry Regiment, known as the 1-9 Cav, had been unsuccessful in finding the expertise they needed to design, build and install new force-protection measures. After meeting with the forward deployed engineering cell from the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, a fix began to take shape.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/2YTF

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Army ManTech Program bridges gap between lab and Soldier

Dr. Shawn Walsh (left), with Army Research Laboratory's Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, explains ARL's investments in lighter, more efficient ballistic materials and defeat mechanisms to Gen. Dennis Via (center), Army Materiel Command commanding general, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Dec. 3, 2012. ARL and Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center jointly executed an Army ManTech program to overcome the technology barriers associated with performing and rapid thermoforming of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene materials into complex shapes such as helmets.

Dr. Shawn Walsh (left), with Army Research Laboratory’s Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, explains ARL’s investments in lighter, more efficient ballistic materials and defeat mechanisms to Gen. Dennis Via (center), Army Materiel Command commanding general, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Dec. 3, 2012. ARL and Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center jointly executed an Army ManTech program to overcome the technology barriers associated with performing and rapid thermoforming of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene materials into complex shapes such as helmets.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Transitioning a technology prototype from an Army engineer’s laboratory to the Soldier on the ground is filled with potential obstacles.

To overcome challenges associated with manufacturing Soldiers’ equipment, from helicopters to helmets, the U.S. Army enlists the Manufacturing Technology Program, commonly known as ManTech.

Andy Davis, ManTech program manager with the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, said his team is focused on addressing issues in affordability and producibility.

“[Scientists and engineers] develop technologies in the labs. They can make one or two [prototypes] in the lab, but they can’t make them in quantity,” Davis said. “ManTech bridges that gap. In terms of the Warfighter impact, it helps get items more quickly to the [field].”

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/4hPm

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APG to launch centralized STEM education center

Harford County eighth-grade students explore science and engineering as part of the fifth annual Technology Needs Teens program at Harford Community College on May 24, 2012. The Aberdeen Proving Ground STEM Education and Outreach Center will be ready in late May 2013.

Harford County eighth-grade students explore science and engineering as part of the fifth annual Technology Needs Teens program at Harford Community College on May 24, 2012. The Aberdeen Proving Ground STEM Education and Outreach Center will be ready in late May 2013.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Maryland students will soon have a unified APG facility at which to explore the world of science and engineering with Army professionals.

The APG STEM Education and Outreach Center will be ready in late May, said Dr. Sandy Young, an Army Research Laboratory materials engineer. She is coordinating the project with ARL laboratory operations and other science, technology, engineering and mathematics outreach offices on APG.

Young said the SEOC will allow multiple APG tenant organizations to pool their resources to benefit students’ experiences in science and engineering. The facility will accommodate up to 200 students.

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/4u5H

 

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Greater than the sum of its parts

Collectively, we’re the Lucius Fox for the U.S. Army.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Dale Ormond, director of RDECOM, stopped at Picatinny to deliver an important message. Click the link to find out what he had to say.

Click here to read more.

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Army engineering team marks a year of solutions in theater

 

Daniel R. McGauley (left), executive officer of the RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, describes a Common Remotely Operated Weapons Station thermal imager protective cover that was designed and fabricated by the RFAST-C at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Jan. 15. McGauley briefs (from left) Maj. Gen. Harold Greene, deputy for acquisition and systems management at ASA (ALT); Heidi Shyu, assistant secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology; and Gen. Dennis L. Via, commanding general of the U.S. Army Materiel Command.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — A team of U.S. civilian engineers and technicians deployed to Afghanistan recently marked one year of solving Soldiers’ technological hurdles.

The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, or RFAST-C, Forward Deployed Prototype Integration Facility provides a platform for its subject matter experts’ knowledge and talents to be translated into battlefield solutions, said Michael Anthony, the team’s director.

To read more:

 http://go.usa.gov/4krY

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RDECOM shares contracting opportunities at APBI

Jill Smith, acting deputy director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, discusses RDECOM’s partnerships with industry during the Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry conference at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Dec. 5.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command presented contracting opportunities Dec. 5 as part of APG’s first installation-wide Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry, or APBI, conference.

Jill Smith, RDECOM acting deputy director, provided an overview of the command and discussed how the Army’s research and development community partners with industry during her opening remarks at the Post Theater.

“Across the command, we leverage industry for about 40 percent of applied research funding,” Smith said. “RDECOM partners with industry for about 60 percent of RDECOM’s advanced technology development budget because that process involves integration, and we want industry to be prepared if we proceed to production in quantity.”

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/gX5F

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