Ground combat system upgrades focus on weight, lethality

 
Soldiers, of the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, tactically move a Stryker over the Mojave Desert during Decisive Action Rotation 15–10 at the National Training Center on Fort Irwin, Calif., Sept. 24, 2015. The Stryker and other ground combat vehicles are undergoing a number of upgrades, according to officials.

By Elizabeth M. Collins, Soldiers

WASHINGTON (Oct. 20, 2015) — Ground combat vehicle modernization efforts are moving forward, on schedule and under budget, the ground combat systems program executive officer told reporters last week.

Designs and engineering change proposals for existing vehicles have been largely finished, contracts are being awarded and some vehicles are being delivered and tested, said GCS PEO Brig. Gen. David Bassett.

“It’s a really exciting time,” he said. There’s “plenty to keep us busy, new requirements emerging, and really great partnerships on how we can tailor the acquisition process, look hard at appropriate requirements, help our user understand what those requirements cost and make meaningful trade offs between desired capabilities.”

The Stryker, for example, is undergoing a lethality upgrade that will include better turret fire control and advanced sensors and cannon systems for the Germany-based 2nd Calvary Regiment.

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Army official: Innovate to win in a complex world; Invest in science, technology to confront future threats

Takeoff and landing are the two most dangerous periods for any aircraft, a danger that is particularly intense for a helicopter caught in a brownout. Army researchers are developing technology solutions to help pilots in Degraded Visual Environments. (U.S. Army photo)

Takeoff and landing are the two most dangerous periods for any aircraft, a danger that is particularly intense for a helicopter caught in a brownout. Army researchers are developing technology solutions to help pilots in Degraded Visual Environments. (U.S. Army photo)

By Heidi Shyu, Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology

Heidi Shyu, Army Acquisition Executive (U.S. Army photo)

Heidi Shyu, Army Acquisition Executive (U.S. Army photo)

In October 2014, the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command rolled out the latest Army Operating Concept, or AOC, entitled “Win in a Complex World.”

It details how the Army of the future will strengthen capabilities across multiple domains as part of a joint partnership to ensure dominance against “determined, elusive, and increasingly capable enemies.”

Simultaneously, it challenges our forces to “conduct expeditionary maneuver through rapid deployment and transition to operations.

The increasing proliferation of technologies to diverse and capable enemies means the Army must be prepared for a wider and more varied threat picture than ever before. This issue of Army AL&T explores ways the Army employs innovative solutions to ensure our continued dominance, including science and technology (S&T) investments valued at approximately $2.5 billion per year. This includes research performed in Army laboratories, individual research projects at universities, the work of university-affiliated research centers and innovations from small and large companies.

The Army funds critical S&T investments not available in commercial products to enable us to develop breakthrough products that will shape the Army of the future.

I will highlight two examples in Army aviation: the Improved Turbine Engine Program, or ITEP, and the Degraded Visual Environment Mitigation, known as DVE-M.

Future of Army Sensors

Mary J. Miller Interview

Army science and technology officials are seeking ways to improve situational awareness, mobility, lethality and the maintainability and effectiveness of Army systems.

Advanced sensors will help meet future challenges, according to Mary J. Miller, who serves as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology with the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology. Miller gave the featured interview for the January/February 2015 Army Technology Magazine, which discusses sensors research.

Army Technology Magazine: What is the Army’s vision for sensors research?

Mary J. Miller: From my perspective, I think that Army S&T is looking at a broad number of approaches for what sensor capabilities we will need to meet future challenges. We’re looking to improve situational awareness, mobility, lethality and even improve the maintainability and effectiveness of our systems.

To achieve these capabilities, we are conducting research in areas such as networked Soldier helmet sensors. For mobility, we have a large effort in establishing Degraded Visual Environment capabilities that will ensure our rotorcraft can fly in any environment such as brownout, snow or just low-light levels. We’re also looking at ways to increase lethality. We just recently transitioned the third generation FLIR [short for Forward Looking Infrared], to the Program Executive Office for Intelligence Electronic Warfare and Sensors. This system gives us the ability to do identification at longer ranges than we have ever before. Identification is required for our rules of engagement in the Army. This is an example of a capability that was transitioned from the S&T community and has been very successful in early operational demonstrations.

Regarding maintainability and effectiveness, we’ve been researching sensors that can be put in the skins of platforms to understand the environment they’ve been in – measuring vibration, ballistic impact or even thermal cycling.  We can even determine battle damage assessment with embedded sensors. We put sensors in our missiles as well to better assess their status.  By understanding what they have experienced, we can determine what capacity they have going forward or whether they have been degraded.

Finally, sensors can enable better power management by telling us when we need to have more power in a particular sub-system and less in another. We can then divert energy to improve effectiveness overall.

Army Technology Magazine: What’s the value in this research? How does it empower Soldiers?

Miller: Sensors and situational awareness are the keys to our Soldiers being effective. I think we’ve all seen the reports that have come out of Afghanistan where unfortunately a majority of the engagements our Soldiers (at the squad and team level) had with the enemy is because they were surprised. That is a situation in which we do not want to put any of our Soldiers.  Holistically the work we have been doing in our sensor technology areas is to help ensure that never happens.

Whether the Soldier is dismounted in a squad fighting in Afghanistan, or is a helicopter pilot having to land and pick up Soldiers in an austere environment, or even a ground platform driver traveling unfamiliar roads at night, we want to provide all of these Soldiers the best capabilities that we can — the capability to conduct their mission with full situational awareness in any situation.

Army Technology Magazine: In realizing the Army’s vision of the future, how critical are S&T investments?

Miller: The Chief of Staff of the Army and the Secretary of the Army have looked at science and technology (S&T) and our portfolios of investments as the enablers for the future.

The Army has been facing significant fiscal challenges and we have had to make tough trades between operational readiness, force structure and modernization. Unfortunately given those three, modernization is the one that suffers.

Since 2012, our modernization accounts have gone down about 40 percent, and that is significant. Modernization accounts are what create the future capability for the Army.  The Army stood up and decided to protect its investments in the science and technology world. Why? Because the Army is now looking to us [the S&T Enterprise] to underpin what will become future capability for the Soldier. They have expanded our mission. They’ve challenged us to go farther than we’ve gone before, to develop prototypes of new capabilities and do experimentation in conjunction with Soldiers to ensure that’s what the Army needs. We’re doing this hand-in-hand with our Training and Doctrine Command. It’s a collaborative effort where we are aligned more than ever with our program executive offices, with TRADOC — our requirements team — and also the S&T community, to make sure we are doing the right things for the Army of the future.

Army Technology Magazine: What about partnerships between Army S&T, industry and academia?

Miller: We need to do more. As our budget reduces, we have to leverage other’s technology development. This is both a challenge and an opportunity. It’s a challenge because frankly we don’t do that very well. It’s an opportunity because there are folks out there with good ideas that we should be trying to leverage. We do better with academia because our labs are experienced in working with basic and applied research and we have many opportunities to engage with Universities. If you listen to our Defense Acquisition Executive, Mr. Kendall, and read Better Buying Power 3.0, he talks about the need to better leverage Industry IR&D, or Independent Research and Development, investments. Those are investments that industry makes in what they see as the next technology breakthroughs. Industry focuses their R&D investments on those technologies they believe will provide future returns.  By informing industry of Army needs, we hope to encourage industry to align the IR&D to meet these needs. I think there is more to be done there to align and leverage as much as we can out of industry.

It’s not just industry and academia [that we need to leverage]. It’s also our foreign partners as well. From my office, in conjunction with the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Defense Exports and Cooperation (who is responsible for international engagement and foreign military sales), we’ve done a more strategic outreach to our partner nations to figure out the technologies that are out there in our global economy. Other nations may have a slight edge on us or a different approach in certain technology areas. We hope to leverage their expertise by making strategic alliances. Very often in the past our international engagements were bottom-up driven. Our laboratory experts would be talking with fellow foreign laboratory experts and they would come up with a project they wanted to do together. The compliment to this approach is where we are making alliances that are strategically driven — where we go out and target technology areas where we know foreign countries have expertise and bring that expertise in to help the Army go forward.

Army Technology Magazine: What’s your message to Army researchers and engineers?

Miller: I am optimistic about the future. Those of us that have been in the Army for awhile know that we always have budget downfalls and then increases. It’s always going to be a roller coaster ride, but at the end of the day the reason we work for the Army is that there are some unique challenges and opportunities for our researchers.

The Army is really relying on our scientists and engineers throughout the S&T Enterprise to step into the breach and basically plot what will be the future for the Army. We are being asked to stand up and deliver, and I fully expect that we will. I have yet to see us fail at being able to solve a problem.

We have some of the world’s best scientists and engineers here within the Army and the Department of Defense dedicated to the work they do in helping the Soldier. It is so clear that the Soldier is our customer. We have a good track record of bringing folks in from the outside, not for the pay, not for the great hours, but because we have such a unique problem and the ability to help and to make a difference.

It is a critical role that the S&T Enterprise plays. As I said, the Chief of Staff and the Secretary of the Army have protected the S&T community through the last couple of years of budget downsizing for this very reason. They see us as a key enabler of the future going forward.

—-

Editor’s note: Since February 2013, Mary J. Miller has served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology. She is responsible for the entirety of Army research and technology programs, spanning 16 laboratories and research, development and engineering Centers, with more than 12,000 scientists and engineers and a yearly budget of more than $2 billion dedicated to empowering, unburdening and protecting Soldiers. She earned an Army Research and Development Achievement Award in 1988 for her technical achievement in the “Development of Nonlinear Materials for Sensor Protection.” She has been awarded four patents for sensor protection designs, with two additional patents pending. Miller has published more than 50 papers and has addressed over 30 major commands and international groups with technical presentations. She holds master of science degrees in business administration from the University of Tennessee and in electrical engineering, electro-physics from the George Washington University. Her undergraduate degree is a bachelor of science in electrical engineering from the University of Washington in Seattle. The Army selected her for the Senior Executive Service in August 2005.

This article appears in the January/February 2015 issue of Army Technology Magazine, which focuses on sensors research. The magazine is available as an electronic download, or print publication. The magazine is an authorized, unofficial publication published under Army Regulation 360-1, for all members of the Department of Defense and the general public.

Ground Robotics Capabilities Conference and Exhibition

The Disrupter Integration System provides disrupter mounting solutions for the Explosive Ordnance Disposal Man Transportable Robotic System robots. By 2021, Army acquisition officials hope to replace current systems with the Man Transportable Robotic System Increment II, known as MTRS Inc II. (U.S. Army photo)

The Disrupter Integration System provides disrupter mounting solutions for the Explosive Ordnance Disposal Man Transportable Robotic System robots. By 2021, Army acquisition officials hope to replace current systems with the Man Transportable Robotic System Increment II, known as MTRS Inc II. (U.S. Army photo)

By David McNally, RDECOM Public Affairs

Future Army robotics systems will rely on open architecture, modular design and innovative concepts to perform missions from surveillance to wide area route clearance, according to Army officials.

“In the Army we always say, ‘never send our Soldiers into a fair fight,’” said Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology Heidi Shyu said in the keynote address Aug. 13, 2014, to the National Defense Industrial Association Ground Robotics Capabilities Conference and Exhibition in Hyattsville, Maryland.

Hundreds of industry representatives, researchers and engineers gathered for the event, which provided a forum for the industry and government to identify technologies that will help meet future warfighter needs.

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Questions and Answers with with Brig. Gen. L. Neil Thurgood

Brig. Gen. L. Neil Thurgood, PEO Missiles and Space

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Sept. 2, 2014) — Brig. Gen. L. Neil Thurgood, Program Executive Officer for Missiles and Space at Redstone Arsenal, Ala., gave an exclusive interview to Army Technology Magazine on the future of lethality.

What is the rationale for increasing firepower and lethality?

The U.S. Army is undergoing a transformation. After a decade of war, Soldiers and equipment are returning to an environment of declining budgets, drawdowns and a shift in operational focus. The Army is facing difficult decisions regarding force structure and modernization divestment. Unfortunately, the threat continues to increase in complexity as we reset, modernize and transform. These challenges are addressed by the Chief of Staff of the Army’s Force 2025 initiative. Force 2025 will prioritize those technologies that support a leaner, more expeditionary force that exceeds current capabilities, allowing for increased firepower and lethality. In this fiscally constrained environment, modernization decisions will be balanced with technology investments to ensure readiness through the transformation.

How do you see technology empowering Soldiers with greater lethality in the future?

PEO Missiles and Space develops, produces, fields and supports U.S. Army, Joint and Coalition missile systems for air and missile defense, direct and indirect fires and aviation platforms. Several of the weapon systems that we manage include Patriot, Javelin, TOW and Hellfire. There is no doubt that the technologies of our missile platforms will be improved through the development efforts of tomorrow. There are several key areas of critical technology development that will empower Soldiers with greater lethality.

Warhead and fuze integration must be developed further. We need single warheads that are advanced enough to be scalable on demand as the mission situation dictates. In the future, the warhead and fuze development must be combined for a single resultant that will provide flexibility while reducing the burden to the Soldier and increasing the effectiveness of the missile system.

Advanced navigation systems that will fuse the single or dual navigation systems of today must be pursued. We must be able to reach off-board the missile system and draw information from other navigation sources that can aid in longer distance engagements and develop more technologies to improve accurate targeting, especially in the end-game.

The development of propulsion energetics should be accelerated. As we reach out further in distance and trend to faster in speeds, we need to reduce the size and foot print of our propulsion systems. This can be done through material synthesis and burn rate enhancement. While we develop these technologies, weapons must remain compliant with insensitive munitions regulations in the ever changing environment of missile applications.

Speed and amount of processing capacity must be increased. In this area, we should develop processing that will increase precision acquisition, especially at the “end game” of the missile engagement. We need to enhance our auto-tracking capabilities. Increased processing must be tied to the next generations of Seeker technology. If we are to combine our current platforms into a single integrated effort, where we can use any sensor to see the threat and the best missile to engage the threat – we need increased ability to process data in real-time. It requires multi-mission platforms with enough processing power and speed to provide a “defense-in-depth” using networked air, ground, naval and space platforms. This will enhance the speed of decision, reduce the kill timeline and subsequently increase the overall probability of success.

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Army researchers focus on partnerships to advance science, engineering

Army Technology Magazine

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Feb. 18, 2014) — Army researchers, scientists and engineers are collaborating and sharing to leverage limited resources and discover leap-ahead technologies.

“I think collaboration is really essential,” said Heidi Shyu, assistant secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology. “No single person or organization possesses a monopoly on innovative ideas. It is critical for us to collaborate with industry, academia, federally funded R&D centers and other government organizations to solve difficult problems. So my vision is that we will collaborate across the board to spur innovation.”

Shyu gave the featured interview in the March issue of Army Technology Magazine, a publication of science and technology news from the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command. Partnership is the focus of the new issue.

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Exclusive Interview with the Honorable Heidi Shyu

photoAssistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology Heidi Shyu serves as the Army acquisition executive, the senior procurement executive, science advisor to the Secretary of the Army, and the Army’s senior research and development official. She also has principal responsibility for all Department of the Army matters related to logistics. She appoints and manages program executive officers and manages the Army Acquisition Corps and Army Acquisition Workforce.

What is your vision for ASA(ALT) collaboration with industry, academia and other organizations?

I think collaboration is really essential. No single person or organization possesses a monopoly on innovative ideas. It is critical for us to collaborate with industry, academia, federally funded R&D centers and other government organizations to solve difficult problems. So my vision is that we will collaborate across the board to spur innovation.

In the S&T arena, we work closely with academia. We also have the Broad Agency Announcement, small business forums, cross–service collaboration on Research, Development, Test and Evaluation. We collaborate with DARPA and university affiliated research centers. We have individual investigator grants and collaborations with partner nations. Defense companies are willing to invest their R&D dollars to help solve the Army’s challenges, so we need to dialogue with them to inform them of our challenges and stay abreast of their ideas, design and development activities. The goal is to get a multitude of ideas to figure out how to solve problems. Collaboration is critical.

How do you see technology providing Soldiers with the decisive edge?

There are many technologies that can provide Soldiers with the decisive edge. One of our key goals is to develop lighter and stronger armor. Why? Because it will enhance survivability and improve mobility. We’re also developing initiatives like continuous soldier health sensing and monitoring, disruptive energetic materials that could provide increased lethality, bio-inspired sensing to eliminate tactical surprise, and energy harvesting to reduce our dependence on fuel.

How do budget concerns affect your vision?

The Army has by and large protected its S&T budget. The rest of the budget has faced double-digit reductions. The American Soldier is the best equipped in the world – thanks to our materiel enterprise. We must continue to invest in S&T in order to equip our Soldier of the future.

We have focused on a 30-year plan, called the long-range investment requirements analysis, or LIRA, which is enabling us to link S&T efforts to programs of record. This will allow us to focus our research activities to address capability shortfalls.

How does ASA(ALT) partner with U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, its centers and laboratories?

The partnership we have with RDECOM is critical. RDECOM plays a very important role across all of the PEOs and the acquisition community by providing critical functions and skill sets such as research, development, systems engineering, design, performance analysis, modeling and simulation, software, reliability analysis, prototyping, integration and test, and more. For example:

  • CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate S&T provided our Soldiers the ability to dominate the night
  • NSRDEC has provided transportable high energy efficient shower units, kitchen units and shelters
  • AMRDEC has provided critical missile expertise to PEO Missile & Space
  • TARDEC has provided high-fidelity modeling and simulation capabilities that accurately predict blast effects on our vehicles and enable us to design more survivable vehicles to reduce injuries to our Soldiers
  • All of CERDEC has provided technical assessment of the effectiveness of our tactical radios

What are your expectations from Army researchers, scientists and engineers?

It’s important for our Army researchers, scientists and engineers to stay fully abreast of the latest technologies and where the research is going. They really have to be masters of their domain to solve the Army’s difficult problems. We rely on them to give us the next generation of capabilities.

I’d like to see tighter linkages between the S&T community with the PMs, PEOs and the requirements community to ensure relevance, especially in this fiscally challenged environment. Ultimately we must understand the art of the possible and how to structure that for the future. As we look at the S&T capabilities we need to develop, I think it is critical for our researchers to tie into our 30-year road-map.

One of the key things I think the Army needs to do is ensure we provide our people with a research environment where they can innovate. We have world-class scientists and engineers in their field, and they are highly motivated to solve the most difficult problems for our Soldiers. I’ve had the pleasure of meeting many of our outstanding researchers, scientists and engineers, and I really admire their dedication, passion for their work and innovation. I’m very impressed with our caliber of researchers, and they are the critical enablers for us to develop the next generation of capabilities for our Soldiers.

Daniel R. McGauley (left), RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center executive officer, describes a Common Remotely Operated Weapons Station thermal imager protective cover designed and fabricated by his team at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Jan. 15, 2013 during a visit from Maj. Gen. Harold Greene, deputy for acquisition and systems management at ASA (ALT); Heidi Shyu, assistant secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology; and Gen. Dennis L. Via, commanding general, Army Materiel Command. (U.S. Army photo)

Daniel R. McGauley (left), RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center executive officer, describes a Common Remotely Operated Weapons Station thermal imager protective cover designed and fabricated by his team at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Jan. 15, 2013 during a visit from Maj. Gen. Harold Greene, deputy for acquisition and systems management at ASA (ALT); Heidi Shyu, assistant secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology; and Gen. Dennis L. Via, commanding general, Army Materiel Command. (U.S. Army photo)

Biography

Partnerships for Synergy

A U.S. Army Ranger assigned to 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, transmits information during Task Force Training on Camp Roberts, Calif., Jan. 31, 2014. Rangers constantly train to maintain their technical proficiency. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Steven Hitchcock)

A U.S. Army Ranger assigned to 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, transmits information during Task Force Training on Camp Roberts, Calif., Jan. 31, 2014. Rangers constantly train to maintain their technical proficiency. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Steven Hitchcock)

By Dan Rusin, RDECOM

Over the past 10 years, the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command has been striving to strengthen partnerships and collaborations to develop cutting edge technology for Soldiers.

One example is the technology enabled capability demonstration effort, known as TECDs. Through the synergy of partnerships and cooperation, TECDs are delivering many key technologies to fill official capability gaps identified by TRADOC.

The TECDs partner several independent efforts across and beyond RDECOM with larger Army goals and capability gaps. TECDs started as collective partner efforts by the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology under specific portfolio managers, to develop technology to meet some of the Army’s critical problem areas using solutions that can be demonstrated between 2014 and 2018. A key benefit to the partnership experience links RDECOM’s products to funding and programs of record.

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Assistant secretary: Work smarter to fill capability gaps

Assistant Secretary for the Army (Acquisition, Logistics & Technology) and Army Acquisition Executive Heidi Shyu arrives at the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center at Detroit Arsenal, Mich. April 9.

Assistant Secretary for the Army (Acquisition, Logistics & Technology) and Army Acquisition Executive Heidi Shyu arrives at the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center at Detroit Arsenal, Mich. April 9.

DETROIT ARSENAL, Mich. — (April 9, 2013) A senior Army leader visited the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s tank and automotive center to meet with workers and outline her vision for the future.

Assistant Secretary for the Army (Acquisition, Logistics & Technology) and Army Acquisition Executive Heidi Shyu spoke with the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center workforce in an April 9 town hall meeting.

The Secretary of the Army’s toughest challenge will be balancing priorities while filling capability gaps in an uncertain fiscal environment, she said.

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C4ISR OTM E10 begins

RDECOM’s communications-electronics center, CERDEC, has begun phase I of the Army’s annual C4ISR system-of-systems, integrated capabilities event, C4ISR OTM E10.

Established by the Army in 2003, C4ISR OTM evaluates technical applications and maturity for emerging networking, sensors and C4ISR-enabling platforms on a year-round basis. This is done to demonstrate the impact of integrating these capabilities in a system-of-systems environment.

The lessons learned during C4ISR OTM E10 will support milestone decisions for programs of record, help to mitigate risk for Army technology objectives, facilitate R&D technology transition to programs of record and aid in developing those technologies through readiness levels.

It will also serve as a venue for assessing and enabling future force capabilities while identifying technology acceleration opportunities into the current force.

Major acquisition programs of record, such as WIN-T Increment 2, JTRS HMS Rifleman Radio and JTRS NED SRW, have leveraged C4ISR OTM risk mitigation and reduction to help achieve milestone decisions, and last year, the Army evaluated the complete future force network stack. This marked the first time that the Soldier Radio Waveform (SRW), the Wideband Networking Waveform (WNW), the Highband Network Waveform (HNW) and Net Centric Waveform (NCW), were integrated with respective Battle Command and ISR assets and assessed as one network.

Phase I of E10 will focus on component-level integration and assessments of individual systems. System-of-systems assessments begin during phase II in July, and capabilities assessments will be conducted by Soldiers during the final phase in August.

C4ISR OTM E10 will emphasize the ASA (AL&T) directed 2013/14 capability set study, align its efforts to support the Army Network Modernization Strategy and explore leap ahead capabilities that can augment and enhance the foundation of network modernization.

C4ISR OTM is an R&D program within the Communications-Electronics Research, Development & Engineering Center (CERDEC) at Fort Monmouth, N.J., one of eight major centers and laboratories that comprise the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM). E10 will be executed from June 1 – Sept. 15, at Fort Dix, N.J.

Check out this video to learn more about C4ISR OTM: http://go.usa.gov/30v .

If you’d like more information regarding E10 or C4ISR OTM, contact CERDEC Public Affairs, (732) 427-1594. Also, be sure to follow us on twitter and Facebook.

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