Posts Tagged AMRDEC

Miniaturization: Where good ideas and technology meet

Shane Thompson, an electronics engineer with the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, displays a compact processor board, developed by AMRDEC's Image and Signal Processing Function, which performs both target acquisition and tracking. (U.S. Army photo by Nikki Montgomery)

Shane Thompson, an electronics engineer with the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, displays a compact processor board, developed by AMRDEC’s Image and Signal Processing Function, which performs both target acquisition and tracking. (U.S. Army photo by Nikki Montgomery)

AMRDEC Public Affairs

Miniaturization and advances in computing have had an enormous impact on all aspects of life — especially in the realm of digital image and signal processing.

Only a decade or two ago, appreciable computing power required to perform military-grade image and signal processing tasks necessitated large, clunky computers or racks of dedicated processors.

Now, powerful processing speeds and computational capability are common in tablet computers and even smart phones.

The U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center now has advanced computational power capabilities in a package small enough to bring complex image and signal processing technology to small battlefield weapons.

“We are leveraging advances in computer technology to push the Army’s state-of-the-art in a diverse range of military applications,” said Steven Vanstone, AMRDEC Image and Signal Processing Function acting chief.

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Future of Army Aviation Research: Q&A with lead researcher

Dr. Bill Lewis is the director of the Aviation Development Directorate for the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research and Development Center at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. (U.S. Army photo by Russ Wetzel)

Dr. Bill Lewis is the director of the Aviation Development Directorate for the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research and Development Center at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. (U.S. Army photo by Russ Wetzel)

RDECOM Public Affairs

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Dr. Bill Lewis is the director of the Aviation Development Directorate for the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research and Development Center at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.

He manages and directs the execution of the Army Aviation Science and Technology portfolio, including basic and applied research, and advanced technology development. A career Army aviator and experimental test pilot, his duties also include serving as the Office of the Secretary of Defense lead for rotorcraft technology, and as director of the National Rotorcraft Technology Center.

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Army aviation researchers focus on rotorcraft

The March/April 2015 issue of Army Technology Magazine focuses on aviation.

The March/April 2015 issue of Army Technology Magazine focuses on aviation.

AMRDEC Public Affairs

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. — Army rotorcraft of the future will depend on the imaginations and engineering prowess of scientists, researchers and aviators at the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Center.

AMRDEC’s Aviation Development Directorate maintains a deep portfolio of science and technology project looking at current and future rotorcraft, including survivability, performance and affordability.

Rusty Graves, the directorate’s acting chief engineer, hopes to use science and technology to enhance the legacy fleet while supporting Future Vertical Lift until it transitions to the Program Executive Office Aviation.

“We manage and conduct basic and applied research, and advanced technology development to provide one-stop life cycle engineering and scientific support for aviation systems and platforms,” Graves said.

AMRDEC divides the directorate’s S&T efforts into six focus areas.

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Own the Weather: Flying in Degraded Visual Environments

Military aircraft are vulnerable in conditions of degraded visibility due to pilots’ inability to discern obstacles, cables, or other aircraft during flight or while landing. (Photo illustration courtesy DARPA)

Military aircraft are vulnerable in conditions of degraded visibility due to pilots’ inability to discern obstacles, cables, or other aircraft during flight or while landing. (Photo illustration courtesy DARPA)

By Bill Crawford, AMRDEC Public Affairs

Army researchers are going after solutions to help aircraft crews navigate in degraded visual environments, where weather, obscurants or obstacles may prove hazardous and even lethal.

Operations in degraded visual environments, known as DVE, are the primary contributing factor to a vast majority of Army aviation mishaps over the last decade: 80-percent of rotorcraft losses in operations in Iraq and Afghanistan were due to “combat non-hostile or non-combat factors” including DVE, according to U.S. Army Program Executive Office Aviation officials.

At the Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, the Army advances and implements technologies to address DVE safety issues and operational limitations.

“Reduced visibility of potentially varying degree, wherein situational awareness and aircraft control cannot be maintained as comprehensively as they are in normal visual meteorological conditions and can potentially be lost,” said Todd Dellert, an experimental test pilot and Acting Project Director, DVE Mitigation, or DVE-M.

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Engineers test bio-fuel in helicopters

During an April 1 test flight, a UH 60A Black Hawk utilizing an Alcohol to Jet bio-fuel blend performs maneuvers above the Redstone Airfield. (U.S. Army photo)

During an April 1 test flight, a UH 60A Black Hawk utilizing an Alcohol to Jet bio-fuel blend performs maneuvers above the Redstone Airfield. (U.S. Army photo)

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. (Oct. 16, 2014) — The Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center, in conjunction with the Redstone Test Center, has completed a historic test program demonstrating the effectiveness a bio-fuel commonly referred to as Alcohol to Jet, in two Army aircraft — a UH-60A Black Hawk and a CH-47D Chinook.

Tests were conducted as a part of a congressionally-funded program to determine whether jet fuel made from non-food stock corn could safely power rotary wing aircraft and perform to Army requirements. The effort was part of a broader Department of Defense strategy initiated in 2009 to reduce dependency upon fossil fuels. ATJ-blends provide a renewable alternative to current aviation fuels, and address the Army Energy Security Strategy and Plans mandate that the Army certify 100 percent of its air platforms on alternative/renewable fuels by 2016.

Bio-fuels are made from renewable sources, such as algae, sugar, switch grass, plant oils and wood. Isobutanol is an alcohol-based bio-fuel produced from non-food stock corn.

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Propulsion Collaboration

AMRDEC, NASA work together on propulsion research.

AMRDEC, NASA work together on propulsion research.

AMRDEC, NASA work together on propulsion research

By Heather R. Smith, AMRDEC Public Affairs

Collaboration between the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center and NASA is almost a no-brainer. NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center is just two miles from the Army’s aviation and missile research facilities.

Dr. Jaime Neidert, AMRDEC chief scientist for energetics said the organizations share much more than just proximity.

Several years ago, Neidert recalled a briefing about the kind of propulsion research going on at the NASA center.

“We realized that we in the DoD and in propulsion have a lot of common interests with NASA, although our payloads are different,” Neidert said. “When it comes to propulsion, both energetic components – the oxidizer – as well as the inert components, such as fuels, adhesives and insulators, have a lot of commonalities.”

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Joint Insensitive Munitions

Researchers, engineers work to improve safety of munitions.

Researchers, engineers work to improve safety of munitions.

Researchers, engineers work to improve safety of munitions

By William H. Ruppert, IV, P.E., Program Manager, Joint Insensitive Munitions Technology Program

It’s the year 2045 and your grandchild is deployed to the hot spot of the future, commanding a ground unit combating the latest terrorist group. The vehicle he is riding in is suddenly struck by two rocket propelled grenades. The vehicle interior is breached and the ammunition inside sustains a direct hit, but none of them explode and the crew has only minor injuries. They quickly assume their respective defensive positions from inside the vehicle and return fire on the aggressors, decisively defeating them. Their training and their equipment have not failed them. They will live to fight another day.

This may sound too farfetched or even impossible, but at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, researchers lead and support the Joint Insensitive Munitions Technology Program, or JIMTP, to develop safer munitions with the goal of ensuring the safety of our future warfighters.

The JIMTP is a unique partnership of government, industry and academic partners. The Office of the Secretary of Defense has program oversight, but it’s managed by ARL, and laboratories within the Air Force and Navy provide technical management. The partnership is essential to ensure the maximum return on investment in a time of increasing fiscal constraint.

These partners are working together to reinvent the way munitions work – making them almost impossible to ‘go off’ when the warfighter doesn’t want them to – while at the same time improving the lethality, reliability, safety and survivability of munitions.

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Army Upgrades Black Hawks for Military District of Washington

The Prototype Integration Facility at Redstone Arsenal, Ala. teamed with the Utility Helicopter Program Management Office to deliver two customized UH-60M Black Hawk aircraft for the U.S. Army Military District of Washington. (U.S. Army photo)

The Prototype Integration Facility at Redstone Arsenal, Ala. teamed with the Utility Helicopter Program Management Office to deliver two customized UH-60M Black Hawk aircraft for the U.S. Army Military District of Washington. (U.S. Army photo)

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. (Nov. 13, 2013) — The Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center’s Prototype Integration Facility teamed with the Utility Helicopter Program Management Office to deliver two customized UH-60M Black Hawk aircraft for the U.S. Army Military District of Washington.

PIF Government Project Lead Katie Bush said the work included the design and integration of Forward Looking Infrared Radar, a Traffic Avoidance System, an Environmental Control System, and an upgraded cabin seating.

The aircraft will be used by the 12th Aviation Battalion for its VIP missions to carry senior leadership and visiting heads of state in the National Capital Region.

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Army announces Technology Investment Agreements for its Joint Multi-Role Technology Demonstrator

The Army's Joint Multi-Role Technology Demonstration is a Science and Technology demonstration intended to mitigate risk for the Future Vertical Lift development program through the testing of advanced technologies and efficient configurations.

The Army’s Joint Multi-Role Technology Demonstration is a Science and Technology demonstration intended to mitigate risk for the Future Vertical Lift development program through the testing of advanced technologies and efficient configurations.

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala., October 3, 2013–The Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center announces the award of four Technology Investment Agreements under Broad Agency Announcement W911W6-12-R-0021 Joint Multi-Role Technology Demonstrator Phase 1 to AVX Aircraft Company, Bell Helicopter Textron Inc., Karem Aircraft Inc., and Sikorsky Aircraft Company.

JMR-TD is a Science and Technology demonstration intended to mitigate risk for the Future Vertical Lift development program through the testing of advanced technologies and efficient configurations.

The purpose of the JMR-TD is to demonstrate an operationally representative mix of capabilities to investigate realistic design trades and enabling technologies. Emerging results from JMR-TD Phase 1 will be used to inform the Future Vertical Lift effort regarding promising vehicle configurations, the maturity of enabling technologies, attainable performance and capabilities , and highlight the affordable technical solutions required to achieve those capabilities.

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Army develops lightweight ballistic protection for aircraft

The AMRDEC Prototype Integration Facility designed, qualified, fabricated and installed a prototype of an enhanced Ballistic Protection System for the cabin of the UH-60 Black Hawk aircraft.

The AMRDEC Prototype Integration Facility designed, qualified, fabricated and installed a prototype of an enhanced Ballistic Protection System for the cabin of the UH-60 Black Hawk aircraft.

REDSTONE ARSENAL (Sept. 25, 2013) — Army tactics and training are constantly changing to meet the threat on the battlefield, and one such example is the attack helicopter.

Originally the AH-1 Cobras were designed to arrive on station quickly, eliminate the threat, and move on to the next target. But in today’s battlefield, attack helicopters like the AH-64 Apaches are providing air support to ground convoys, and often hovering over convoys to eliminate any sign of threats.

These combat operations result in increased exposure to enemy ground fire and increased need for ballistic protection systems, and the Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center’s Prototype Integration Facility has developed that expertise.

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Latest version of America’s Army ready for download

The next version of the America's Army video game was released today and is now available for download. This newest version emphasizes small unit tactical maneuvers and training that reflects the current day Army and emphasizes Army Values, teamwork, training and completing the objectives through gameplay that reflects the Soldier's Creed.

The next version of the America’s Army video game was released today and is now available for download. This newest version emphasizes small unit tactical maneuvers and training that reflects the current day Army and emphasizes Army Values, teamwork, training and completing the objectives through gameplay that reflects the Soldier’s Creed.

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. (Sept. 3, 2013) — The next version of the America’s Army video game was released today and is now available for download.

Players can register their Soldier name for the game at the America’s Army: Proving Ground website, www.americasarmy.com, and then jump into the Army action.

America’s Army is developed out of the Software Engineering Directorate of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center at Redstone Arsenal. While more than a decade old, the game stays new and relevant with frequent updates and new product lines.

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Army scientist honored for exceptional service

Dr. Jay Loomis, recently retired Senior Research Scientist from the US Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center, addresses a small crowd at Redstone Arsenal, Ala. after receiving the highest honorary award granted by the Secretary of the Army, the Decoration for Exceptional Civilian Service.

Dr. Jay Loomis, recently retired Senior Research Scientist from the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center, addresses a small crowd at Redstone Arsenal, Ala., after receiving the highest honorary award granted by the Secretary of the Army, the Decoration for Exceptional Civilian Service.

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. (June 10, 2013) — A recently retired Army research scientist was the focus of honors June 7 during ceremonies here.

The Army honored senior research scientist Dr. Jester (Jay) Loomis during a small ceremony with family and coworkers hosted by Eric Edwards, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center director.

Loomis’s award, signed by Secretary of the Army John M. McHugh, was the Decoration for Exceptional Civilian Service and it is the highest Department of the Army honorary award granted by the Secretary of the Army.

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Engineers work to better monitor missile health

Stephen Marotta, principal investigator with the Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center, watches as Stephen Horowitz, a Ducommun Miltec engineer, displays a fully functional prototype MEMs sensor being developed to monitor vibration in support of missile health monitoring.

Stephen Marotta, principal investigator with the Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center, watches as Stephen Horowitz, a Ducommun Miltec engineer, displays a fully functional prototype MEMs sensor being developed to monitor vibration in support of missile health monitoring.

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. (May 13, 2013) — The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s aviation and missile center is leveraging micro-electro-mechanical systems research in a new application to detect potentially damaging vibrations encountered by missiles during handling, transport and operation.

Stephen Marotta, Engineering Directorate project principal investigator, said MEMS research has been ongoing at Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center for many years and many different applications have been successfully transitioned from the lab to the Soldier in the field.

In an effort to improve missile health monitoring, Marotta began collaborating with Mohan Sanghadasa, from AMRDEDC’s Weapons Development and Integration Directorate, and Stephen Horowitz, an engineer with Ducommun Miltec.

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Army team spans globe for science, technology solutions

RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, or RFAST-C, engineers and technicians discuss prototype integration facility capabilities with senior noncommissioned officers from the 18th Engineer Brigade at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, in June 2012.

RDECOM Field Assistance in Science and Technology-Center, or RFAST-C, engineers and technicians discuss prototype integration facility capabilities with senior noncommissioned officers from the 18th Engineer Brigade at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, in June 2012.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — U.S. Army science advisors are embedded with major units around the world to speed technology solutions to Soldiers’ needs.

The Field Assistance in Science and Technology program’s 30 science advisors, both uniformed officers and Army civilians, provide a link between Soldiers and the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s thousands of subject matter experts.

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http://go.usa.gov/T9Gd

 

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America’s Army Comics app depicts Soldier lifestyle

The America's Army comic book is available via the website or tablet App at http://comics.americasarmy.com.

The America’s Army comic book is available via the website or tablet App at http://comics.americasarmy.com.

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. (April 10, 2013) — Deep in a maze of corridors at the Army Game Studio here, the worlds of graphic art, gaming and military collide.

This is where artists, Soldiers and gaming experts collaborate to use games and comic books to communicate to the public the reality of being a Soldier in the U.S. Army.

Developed out of the Software Engineering Directorate of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center, the America’s Army game, at www.americasarmy.com, is more than a decade old. Yet it stays new and relevant with frequent updates and new product lines.

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Engineering director encourages cost-consciousness

James Lackey is the new director of the Engineering Directorate at the Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center. to Credit: Ryan Keith

James Lackey is the new director of the Engineering Directorate at the Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center. to Credit: Ryan Keith

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. — Former Naval Air Systems Command test project engineer James Lackey has joined the Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center as director of the Engineering Directorate.

A native of Maryland, Lackey had a near 25-year career at the Naval Air Systems Command at Patuxent River, Md. He was a strike aircraft flight test project engineer for more than a decade, and between 1999 and 2008 held a variety of program management assignments.

Lackey said he is looking forward to applying his background from the Navy to the Army and multiple-service customers supported by AMRDEC.

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Army aviation engineer has exciting career

Anna Locke, electrical engineer and project manager at AMRDEC's Prototype Integration Facility, describes modifications to the Common Missile Warning System during a 2009 tour of the facility.

Anna Locke, electrical engineer and project manager at AMRDEC’s Prototype Integration Facility, describes modifications to the Common Missile Warning System during a 2009 tour of the facility.

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. — From an early age, Anna Locke wanted to be an engineer.

“Since I was just a child, I remember hearing stories of my father’s efforts to help our Soldiers as an engineer for [the Department of Defense]. I thought he had the most interesting job in the world,” Locke said. “I knew from a young age that I wanted to pursue an exciting career that results in helping those that risk their lives to protect this country.”

Today, Locke is fulfilling that dream as an electrical engineer at the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s aviation and missile center.

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Alabama honors Army aviation directorate

Engineering Directorate Logo

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. — The Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center’s Engineering Directorate has received an Alabama Performance Excellence Award.

The award is administered by the AlaQuest Center for Performance Excellence, which assists organizations to achieve excellence and efficiency through training and education, workforce development and best practice sharing.

Former ED director Patti Martin said the award demonstrates the commitment of the work force to technical excellence and the effectiveness of the directorate’s technical processes and partnerships. Martin was director at the time the award application was submitted.

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Army ManTech Program bridges gap between lab and Soldier

Dr. Shawn Walsh (left), with Army Research Laboratory's Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, explains ARL's investments in lighter, more efficient ballistic materials and defeat mechanisms to Gen. Dennis Via (center), Army Materiel Command commanding general, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Dec. 3, 2012. ARL and Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center jointly executed an Army ManTech program to overcome the technology barriers associated with performing and rapid thermoforming of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene materials into complex shapes such as helmets.

Dr. Shawn Walsh (left), with Army Research Laboratory’s Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, explains ARL’s investments in lighter, more efficient ballistic materials and defeat mechanisms to Gen. Dennis Via (center), Army Materiel Command commanding general, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Dec. 3, 2012. ARL and Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center jointly executed an Army ManTech program to overcome the technology barriers associated with performing and rapid thermoforming of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene materials into complex shapes such as helmets.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Transitioning a technology prototype from an Army engineer’s laboratory to the Soldier on the ground is filled with potential obstacles.

To overcome challenges associated with manufacturing Soldiers’ equipment, from helicopters to helmets, the U.S. Army enlists the Manufacturing Technology Program, commonly known as ManTech.

Andy Davis, ManTech program manager with the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, said his team is focused on addressing issues in affordability and producibility.

“[Scientists and engineers] develop technologies in the labs. They can make one or two [prototypes] in the lab, but they can’t make them in quantity,” Davis said. “ManTech bridges that gap. In terms of the Warfighter impact, it helps get items more quickly to the [field].”

Read more:

http://go.usa.gov/4hPm

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Greater than the sum of its parts

Collectively, we’re the Lucius Fox for the U.S. Army.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Dale Ormond, director of RDECOM, stopped at Picatinny to deliver an important message. Click the link to find out what he had to say.

Click here to read more.

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