International partnering is a win-win proposition: RFEC Pacific

RFEC - Pacific

U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command scientists and engineers are stationed around the globe to explore international collaboration opportunities in scientific research and technology development, opportunities that will potentially close capability gaps for the U.S. Army.

Three regional RDECOM Forward Element Commands, known as RFECs, represent this international endeavor:

  • RFEC Atlantic
  • RFEC Americas
  • RFEC Pacific

From basic science to insights on maturing technology, foreign research contributes to the development of U.S. products and provides solutions that improve American capabilities.

RFEC Pacific facilitates the Army’s S&T collaboration efforts throughout the Asia-Pacific region, which spans 36 countries.

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International partnering is a win-win proposition: RFEC Americas

RFEC - Americas

U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command scientists and engineers are stationed around the globe to explore international collaboration opportunities in scientific research and technology development, opportunities that will potentially close capability gaps for the U.S. Army.

Three regional RDECOM Forward Element Commands, known as RFECs, represent this international endeavor:

  • RFEC Atlantic
  • RFEC Americas
  • RFEC Pacific

From basic science to insights on maturing technology, foreign research contributes to the development of U.S. products and provides solutions that improve American capabilities.

Founded in 2004, RFEC Americas, headquartered in Santiago, Chile, is the newest and smallest of the three forward element commands.

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International partnering is a win-win proposition: RFEC Atlantic

U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command scientists and engineers are stationed around the globe to explore international collaboration opportunities in scientific research and technology development, opportunities that will potentially close capability gaps for the U.S. Army.

Three regional RDECOM Forward Element Commands, known as RFECs, represent this international endeavor:

  • RFEC Atlantic
  • RFEC Americas
  • RFEC Pacific

From basic science to insights on maturing technology, foreign research contributes to the development of U.S. products and provides solutions that improve American capabilities.

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Agreements extend reach, ensure success

ARL scientist Kang Xu is one of the inventors responsible for a 30-percent increase in energy density in lithium batteries.

ARL scientist Kang Xu is one of the inventors responsible for a 30-percent increase in energy density in lithium batteries. (U.S. Army photo by Conrad Johnson)

Army researchers, scientists and engineers offer technology solutions to complex problems. But, they don’t do it alone. Through an intricate web of agreements, alliances and collaborative efforts, The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command extends its reach, expands its potential and gets the job done.

RDECOM has six research centers, three international forward element commands and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory. The forward element commands conduct technology searches across the globe and providing combatant commanders with science advisors.

Ten years ago, the Army established RDECOM to improve integration. The goal was to reduce the time for technology to transition from laboratories to Soldiers. Since then, the command has worked to increase agility and take advantage of technology opportunities to solve immediate operational problems.

“RDECOM is the Army’s go-to organization for scientific and engineering expertise that defines the space between the state of the art and the art of the possible,” said RDECOM Director Dale A. Ormond. “We deliver innovative technology solutions to ensure the United States maintains global battlefield dominance.”

Ormond said his organization provides engineering services and support to program executive offices, program managers, the Army’s Life Cycle Management Commands, known as LCMCs, and other customers.

“We develop technical specifications, administer contractual efforts, provide technical oversight of programs, engineer configuration management and much more,” he said. “Our largest mission is engineering. RDECOM has a strategic approach to identify, prioritize and resource critical engineering requirements.

Rapid prototyping is another engineering service provided by RDECOM. Prototype Integration Facilities, known as PIFs, develop concepts and engineering designs for rapid conversion into prototypes for immediate use by Soldiers, or for transition to full-scale production.

Most of RDECOM’s research centers have either a special facility that is designated as a PIF or have the capability. The PIFs focus on the development and fabrication of prototypes in limited quantities rather than mass production.

“Predominately funded by customer reimbursable dollars, the goal of each PIF is to produce results as quickly as possible at the lowest possible cost,” Ormond explained.

Providing these engineering services and prototyping capabilities from a workforce that has developed technical expertise through hands on bench work and development of cutting edge technologies allows the Army materiel acquisition community to be a Smart Buyer, as defined in the Weapons Systems Acquisition Reform Act of 2009.

RDECOM Business Model

RDECOM operates in the Army acquisition process in three distinct areas:

  • Science and technology development
  • Program engineering and acquisition
  • Sustainment engineering

ARL researchers lead the process through discovery and innovation. At this stage, RDECOM partners with industry and academia to form Collaborative Technology Alliances.

One example is the Flexible Display Center at Arizona State University. More than 10 years ago, U.S. Army researchers saw potential in flexible displays. With nothing in the marketplace, the Army decided to partner with industry and academia to create the Flexible Display Center.

Industry partners, such as Raytheon, Corning, HP and LG, work with academic partners, such as Oregon State University, Lehigh University and ASU and RDECOM research centers to achieve a leadership position in the emerging flexible electronics industry.

Once technology solutions have matured they enter an advanced development stage and transition to one of RDECOM’s six research centers. The centers cover all the bases with research in lethality, Soldier systems, ground vehicles, chemical-biological, aviation and missile, and communications-electronics. Researchers and engineers work with PEOs and PMs to move technology solutions to the engineering and production phase.

Finally as products are fielded to the force, RDECOM engineers work with LCMCs to provide sustainment engineering. One example would be providing upgrades to fielded equipment, like the AH-64E Apache Guardian attack helicopter, which was delivered to Soldiers in January 2013.

RDECOM is a major subordinate command of the U.S. Army Materiel Command. AMC is the Army’s premier provider of materiel readiness — technology, acquisition support, materiel development, logistics power projection, and sustainment — to the total force, across the spectrum of joint military operations. If a Soldier shoots it, drives it, flies it, wears it, eats it or communicates with it, AMC provides it.

 

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Army, Maryland schools turn students into ‘STEM Superstars’

Lisby Elementary, Aberdeen, MD, fourth-grade teacher Dan McGonigal looks on as his students explain their 'Bad Hair Day Fixer' prototype during the CERDEC-led STEM Superstar program, which engages students from first through fifth grade in stimulating activities challenging students to think creatively and solve problems like an engineer.

Lisby Elementary, Aberdeen, MD, fourth-grade teacher Dan McGonigal looks on as his students explain their ‘Bad Hair Day Fixer’ prototype during the CERDEC-led STEM Superstar program, which engages students from first through fifth grade in stimulating activities challenging students to think creatively and solve problems like an engineer. (U.S. Army photo by Amanda Rominiecki)

By Amanda Rominiecki, CERDEC Public Affairs

During its second full academic year, the STEM Superstar program continues to bring science, technology, engineering and mathematics to elementary students around Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

The U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center created the STEM Superstar program to engage Harford and Cecil County students from first through fifth grade in stimulating activities challenging students to think creatively and solve problems like an engineer.

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Army researchers kick off modular active protection system mission

TARDEC Engineer Jason Morse addresses technology leaders from across the U.S. Army's AMC, RDECOM, the Maneuver Center of Excellence and ground vehicle PEOs during the MAPS Kickoff Meeting Dec. 3-4, 2013 (U.S. Army photo)

TARDEC Engineer Jason Morse addresses technology leaders from across the U.S. Army’s AMC, RDECOM, the Maneuver Center of Excellence and ground vehicle PEOs during the MAPS Kickoff Meeting Dec. 3-4, 2013 (U.S. Army photo)

TARDEC Public Affairs

The U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center officially kicked off a joint mission Dec. 3-4, 2013, to develop a Modular Active Protection System, known as MAPS, by welcoming technology leaders from across the Army.

Officials from U.S. Army Materiel Command, U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, the Maneuver Center of Excellence at Fort Benning, Ga., and ground vehicle program executive offices formed a joint team to deliver a common framework to enable affordable, reduced-weight, protective systems for ground vehicles.

RDECOM presented plans at the meeting to develop a modular system to protect Soldiers while fitting within program manager constraints regarding cost and platform size, weight, power and cooling requirements.

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U.S. Army, Australian leaders talk research, development cooperation

Dale A. Ormond (right), director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, discusses his organization with Dr. Alex Zelinsky, Australia’s chief defense scientist, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Jan. 27.

Dale A. Ormond (right), director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, discusses his organization with Dr. Alex Zelinsky, Australia’s chief defense scientist, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Jan. 27.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Jan. 28, 2014) — Australia’s chief defense scientist met with U.S. Army leaders Jan. 27 to explore opportunities for research and development partnerships.

The U.S. Army’s engagement with foreign partners in fostering science and engineering is essential to ensuring that Soldiers, as well as American allies, have access to the world’s best technology, said Dale A. Ormond, director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command.

“We are trying to expand our international outreach,” Ormond said. “Seventy percent of the money spent worldwide on science and technology is outside the U.S. There are great scientists and engineers everywhere. [It's important to] go find out who they are and work with them.”

Read more: http://go.usa.gov/BC6w

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Army program secures critical component for artillery, mortar ammunition

Soldiers assigned to Bulldog Battery, Field Artillery Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment load a M777A2 Howitzer during 2CR's Maneuver Rehearsal Exercise at Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany, Feb. 13, 2013. The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition.

Soldiers assigned to Bulldog Battery, Field Artillery Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment load a M777A2 Howitzer during 2CR’s Maneuver Rehearsal Exercise at Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany, Feb. 13, 2013. The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army is nearing completion on a project to eliminate its dependency on foreign countries for a critical energetic component in artillery and mortar ammunition, officials said.

Because of changes in the global cotton industry, the United States no longer has a domestic source of quality raw material for manufacturing nitrocellulose for combustible cartridge cases that are used extensively by the military. A domestic source is necessary to ensure a sufficient supply of quality cartridge cases, which is vital to maintaining readiness of the armed forces, according to Army experts.

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http://go.usa.gov/ZtYJ

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Army power, energy research moves forward

Find out how Army researchers are developing new efficient, effective power and energy for Soldiers.

Find out how Army researchers are developing new efficient, effective power and energy for Soldiers.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Jan. 2, 2014) — Army researchers and scientists are advancing power and energy for the future.

“One of the best ways we can help protect our Soldiers is to ensure they have the power and energy they need to complete their operational missions,” said Katherine Hammack, assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment. “Without power and energy they stand still, unable to move their vehicles and they are silent, unable to use their radios to communicate.”

Hammack is the featured interview in the January issue of Army Technology Magazine, a publication of science and technology news from the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command.

RDECOM has six research and engineering centers and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory working on technology solutions for Soldiers.

The current issue of the magazine features an overview of the future of Army power and energy, a look at Energy Informed Operations and articles on fulfilling the power needs of tomorrow’s Soldiers.

“Our Soldiers rely on power and energy for operating, vehicles, communicating, firing weapons, and more,” said RDECOM Director Dale A. Ormond. “Looking to the future, it appears our reliance on power and energy will only grow.”

At the command’s tank and automotive center, researchers are collaborating with the Department of Energy to achieve new fuel efficiencies.

But energy efficiencies will not only be in vehicles.

Tomorrow’s Army may use innovative garbage-to-energy convertors to reduce the Army’s carbon footprint at forward operating bases. The Tactical Garbage to Energy Refinery, known as TGER, is a deployable bio refinery prototype system designed to convert field waste into immediate usable energy.

“TGER is an energy machine that happens to get rid of waste,” said Dr. James Valdes, a senior technologist for biotechnology at the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center. “It is not a trash disposal that happens to make a little energy. There’s a big distinction and it depends on your mission.”

The magazine is available as an electronic download, or print publication. Army Technology Magazine is an authorized, unofficial publication published under AR 360-1, for all members of the Department of Defense and the general public.

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RDECOM discusses contracting opportunities at 2013 APBI

U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command representatives discuss contracting opportunities with visitors during the Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry conference at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Dec. 4.

U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command representatives discuss contracting opportunities with visitors during the Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry conference at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Dec. 4.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Dec. 5, 2013) — The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command presented upcoming contracts Dec. 4 during APG’s second annual Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry conference.

Mary Miller, deputy assistant secretary of the Army for Research and Technology, discussed the current state and the future of Army science and technology during her keynote speech at the APG Post Theater. She emphasized that the research and development community will serve a key role in shaping the Army’s future after 12 years of war.

“It’s important to understand the role of science and technology and the balance we have to strike. Our responsibility is to build the Army of the future, but we still need to take care of the Army that we currently have,” Miller said. “Our balance has been changing as circumstances dictate. In the last decade of war, we have spent a lot of our time and thought equity helping the current force through urgent requirements and needs coming out of theater.

“We determined how to fix those problems that Soldiers have and give them critical solutions. As we’re coming out of war, we’re seeing the need to get back to our roots and look to the Army of the future.”

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ECBC Field Operations and Laboratory Analysis support OPCW mission

ECBC had only six months to produce an operational model of a new transportable elimination technology that could neutralize chemical warfare materiel: the FDHS. Through unprecedented collaborative efforts across multiple government organizations, ECBC led the FDHS effort through full lifecycle development, from design and fabrication to engineering and test evaluation of the system.

ECBC had only six months to produce an operational model of a new transportable elimination technology that could neutralize chemical warfare materiel: the FDHS. Through unprecedented collaborative efforts across multiple government organizations, ECBC led the FDHS effort through full lifecycle development, from design and fabrication to engineering and test evaluation of the system.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — The U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center has long supported the non-proliferation of chemical weapons and the demilitarization of their stockpiles and destruction facilities. These two areas reflect the mission of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which will be awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize Dec. 10 “for its extensive efforts to eliminate chemical weapons.”

Sixteen years after the independent, autonomous international organization based in The Hague, The Netherlands, administered the Chemical Weapons Convention in 1997, 190 member states have ratified the treaty, including the newly joined Syrian Arab Republic on Oct. 14, 2013. The CWC is an arms control agreement that outlaws the production, stockpiling and use of chemical weapons. The OPCW also has a working relationship with the United Nations to promote peace, disarmament and international cooperation; and ECBC has supported these efforts in significant ways.

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Armor plates’ ballistics protection scrutinized for Soldier safety

U.S. Army Research Laboratory engineers compare failure modes from projectile impact between the Aluminum Alloy 7017 plate versus the other candidate aluminum alloy plate at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Oct. 15, 2015. A small-scale model of an experimental percussion firing gun sits in the foreground. (From left) Denver Gallardy, general engineer in the Armor Mechanisms Branch; Tyrone Jones, mechanical engineer in the Armor Mechanisms Branch; Brian Placzankis, team leader for the Corrosion and Surface Science Team; Kevin Doherty, materials engineer in the Lightweight and Specialty Metals Branch; Rich Squillacioti, materials engineer and leader of the Specifications and Standards Office.

U.S. Army Research Laboratory engineers compare failure modes from projectile impact between the Aluminum Alloy 7017 plate versus the other candidate aluminum alloy plate at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Oct. 15, 2015. A small-scale model of an experimental percussion firing gun sits in the foreground. (From left) Denver Gallardy, general engineer in the Armor Mechanisms Branch; Tyrone Jones, mechanical engineer in the Armor Mechanisms Branch; Brian Placzankis, team leader for the Corrosion and Surface Science Team; Kevin Doherty, materials engineer in the Lightweight and Specialty Metals Branch; Rich Squillacioti, materials engineer and leader of the Specifications and Standards Office.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Dec. 4, 2013) — A team of U.S. Army engineers is enhancing Soldier safety in ground vehicles by scrutinizing and validating improved alloys for armor-plate applications.

The military’s ground systems require better structural armor plate materials to meet the ballistic and blast threats from America’s adversaries while withstanding the corrosiveness of harsh combat environments, the group said.

The U.S. Army Research Laboratory, known as ARL, one of seven organizations that make up the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, is leading the effort. The group has turned to the Office of the Secretary of Defense Comparative Technology Office for funding.

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Building the human body, one cell at a time

Reginald Gray, Ph.D, MBA is supporting ECBC's Life Sciences division as a postdoctoral fellow from Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE).

Reginald Gray, Ph.D, MBA is supporting ECBC’s Life Sciences division as a postdoctoral fellow from Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education.

 

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Reginald Gray, Ph.D, M.B.A. was always excited about medicine and science. After spending his undergraduate summers doing biomedical research, he graduated from Xavier University of Louisiana and enrolled in graduate school earning his Ph.D in Pharmacology from Case Western Reserve University. He later attended medical school and began working for the United States Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense. Gray is now an Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education postdoctoral fellow working with the in vitro stem cell group at the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center.

Gray is utilizing his graduate studies in pathology, pharmacology and medical school training in cardiology to support Harry Salem, Ph.D, Chief Scientist for Life Sciences, to develop the Human-on-a-Chip project. The Human-on-a-Chip project is currently focused on using in vitro stem cell technologies in predictive human toxicology of four organ systems: heart, lung, liver, and nervous system. The project will help give better data as to how the human body might react to everything from chemical warfare agents to diseases. Recently, Human-on-a-Chip was awarded $24 million by Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, Pacific, on behalf of Defense Threat Reduction Agency to continue research for Human-on-a-Chip along with Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, the University of Michigan, Morgan State University and The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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RDECOM demonstrates advances in Army power, energy at Pentagon

Katherine Hammack (left), assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, talks with Robert Berlin, a mechanical engineer with RDECOM's Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, in the Pentagon Courtyard Nov. 14.

Katherine Hammack (left), assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, talks with Robert Berlin, a mechanical engineer with RDECOM’s Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, in the Pentagon Courtyard Nov. 14.

WASHINGTON (Nov. 14, 2013) — The U.S. Army showcased how its research and engineering centers are enabling advances in operational energy for Soldiers Nov. 14 at the Pentagon.

Subject matter experts from across the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command discussed their work in technologies that included Soldier-borne electronics, ground-vehicle fuel efficiency and sustainable base camps.

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http://go.usa.gov/WPam

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Energizing base camps of the future

Lt. Col. Ross Poppenberger, Product Manager Force Sustainment Systems (left), speaks with Katherine Hammack, assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, about energy-efficient Rigid Wall Camps, during the Nov. 5, 2013,

Lt. Col. Ross Poppenberger, Product Manager Force Sustainment Systems (left), speaks with Katherine Hammack, assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, about energy-efficient Rigid Wall Camps, during the Nov. 5, 2013, “Base Camp Resource and Energy Efficiency Day” at the Army Base Camp Integration Laboratory, Fort Devens, Mass. (U.S. Army photo by David Kamm)

FORT DEVENS, Mass. (Nov. 6, 2013) — Innovations meant to improve Soldiers’ quality of life during deployments — while saving lives, fuel, water and money — were on display here Nov. 5, at the Army Base Camp Integration Laboratory.

The Army Base Camp Integration Laboratory, or BCIL, hosted its second annual “Base Camp Resource and Energy Efficiency Day.” Situated on 10 acres at Fort Devens, the laboratory features two “Force Provider” 150-person base camps. One contains standard technologies; the other offers a glimpse into the Army’s energy future.

Katherine Hammack, assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, and Lt. Gen. Raymond V. Mason, Army deputy chief of staff, Logistics, were among those attending the event. They were briefed about shelters, power management, energy storage, waste disposal and waste-to-energy systems, alternative energy, micro-grids, energy-efficient structures, rigid-wall camps, and fuel-fired kitchens.

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STEM Starters: The World of Pressure

Diagram 1. Pressure in relation to airflow.

Diagram 1. Pressure in relation to airflow.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (Nov. 8, 2013) — Most of us are more than accustomed to pressure, both in the scientific and human sense of the word. Many, however, do not equate the significance of pressure with everyday observations.

We all know about pressure’s relationship to weather patterns, bottle rockets, and air travel. Examples of pressure are not limited to these gaseous examples however. As you may remember from school, pressure is obtained by dividing a force by an applied area.

Example: The pressure you exert on the floor doubles as you switch from standing on two feet to one. It is much safer to peel an apple with a sharp knife rather than a dull knife because the sharp knife has a relatively smaller cutting surface area, thus increases the pressure applied to the apple per unit force. Being able to cut the apple with less force means a lower probability that one will slip with the knife.

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Results from Army, university tests could improve auto, aviation industry standards

Tensor 900 six degrees of freedom (6-DoF) shaker

Tensor 900 six degrees of freedom (6-DoF) shaker

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Nov. 13, 2013) — Results from a recent study that looked at how battlefield-born vibrations, like those from blasts and heavy armored vehicles, for example, are leading research scientists to rethink military vehicle testing and evaluation methods that could also, eventually, improve automotive and aviation industry standards.

A group of Army and University of Maryland researchers and engineers have developed reliability tests to better capture unforeseen failures in ground and air vehicle designs before the military adopts systems and components.

Ed Habtour, principal investigator on the project at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, said the physics of failure, known as PoF, based reliability models and test methods developed by ARL, U.S. Army Materiel Systems Activity Analysis, or AMSAA, Aberdeen Test Center, the University of Maryland’s Center for Advanced Life Cycle Engineering, or CALCE, TEAM Corporation and Data Physics Corporation were run on the TEAM Tensor 900 six degrees of freedom, referred to as 6-DoF, shaker, one of only two of its kind in the world.

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Army Upgrades Black Hawks for Military District of Washington

The Prototype Integration Facility at Redstone Arsenal, Ala. teamed with the Utility Helicopter Program Management Office to deliver two customized UH-60M Black Hawk aircraft for the U.S. Army Military District of Washington. (U.S. Army photo)

The Prototype Integration Facility at Redstone Arsenal, Ala. teamed with the Utility Helicopter Program Management Office to deliver two customized UH-60M Black Hawk aircraft for the U.S. Army Military District of Washington. (U.S. Army photo)

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. (Nov. 13, 2013) — The Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center’s Prototype Integration Facility teamed with the Utility Helicopter Program Management Office to deliver two customized UH-60M Black Hawk aircraft for the U.S. Army Military District of Washington.

PIF Government Project Lead Katie Bush said the work included the design and integration of Forward Looking Infrared Radar, a Traffic Avoidance System, an Environmental Control System, and an upgraded cabin seating.

The aircraft will be used by the 12th Aviation Battalion for its VIP missions to carry senior leadership and visiting heads of state in the National Capital Region.

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Picatinny’s new doctorate program stays on course

George Fischer teaches an advanced mathematics course to students enrolled in the doctorate program at the Armament Academy at Picatinny Arsenal.

George Fischer teaches an advanced mathematics course to students enrolled in the doctorate program at the Armament Academy at Picatinny Arsenal.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (Oct. 30, 2013) — The Armament Academy, the first-of-its-kind doctorate degree-granting institution at Picatinny Arsenal, welcomed the first cohort of students, Sept. 6.

Admission into the program was competitive with 17 students admitted out of 25 applications.

The program offers a unique curriculum that is catered to the specific needs of the students drawn from the Armament Research, Development and Engineering workforce.

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NSRDEC deploys energy-efficient tents for testing

A group of shelters were sent to the Southwest Asia Area of Responsibility to be tested by both the Army and Air Force recently as part of the

A group of shelters were sent to the Southwest Asia Area of Responsibility to be tested by both the Army and Air Force recently as part of the “Advanced, Energy-Efficient Shelter Systems for Contingency Basing and Other Applications” program. Tents were outfitted with advanced materials and other technology.

NATICK, Mass. (Oct. 29, 2013) — Wherever Soldiers go, shelters must go, too. These shelter systems must not only protect and provide comfort; they must also be as energy efficient as possible. Every time a base camp needs fuel delivered, that camp and its warfighters are exposed to vulnerabilities.

That’s why a group of shelters were sent to the Southwest Asia Area of Responsibility to be tested by both the Army and Air Force recently as part of the “Advanced, Energy-Efficient Shelter Systems for Contingency Basing and Other Applications” program.

“It’s not until you actually put it in an operational environment where you can really have a good assessment of what will work and what won’t work for the Army,” said Amy Klopotoski, contingency basing science and technology lead at the Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center.

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