Army, Air Force take bomb disposal to new level with lasers

The Recovery of Airbase Denied by Ordinance, or RADBO, prototype performs during the testing phase in February 2015 at Redstone Test Center, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama (U.S. Army photos)

The Recovery of Airbase Denied by Ordinance, or RADBO, prototype performs during the testing phase in February 2015 at Redstone Test Center, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama (U.S. Army photos)

By Carlotta Maneice, AMRDEC Public Affairs

The U.S. Army and Air Force are working together to develop Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles with laser technology.

Before, when the military wanted to disable a bomb, highly trained bomb disposal specialists wore body armor, protective suits or used robots to render an area safe.

With lasers, operators can negate the threat of improvised explosive devices, makeshift bombs, mines, and other unexploded explosive ordnance from a safe distance.

The U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center Prototype Integration Facility, U.S. Air Force Air Combat Command and the Redstone Test Center developed the technology.

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DOD showcases innovation

Osie David (right), an RDECOM computer scientist, explains new communications and electronics technology to Mary Miller, deputy assistant secretary of the Army for Research and Technology, at the Department of Defense Lab Day at the Pentagon May 14, 2015. (U.S. Army photo by Conrad Johnson)

Osie David (right), an RDECOM computer scientist, explains new communications and electronics technology to Mary Miller, deputy assistant secretary of the Army for Research and Technology, at the Department of Defense Lab Day at the Pentagon May 14, 2015. (U.S. Army photo by Conrad Johnson)

By Dan Lafontaine, RDECOM Public Affairs

Military researchers demonstrated how their scientific and engineering efforts enable technological overmatch for Soldiers during the Department of Defense Lab Day at the Pentagon May 14.

Subject-matter experts from the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s seven centers and labs displayed examples of their latest research to hundreds of uniformed and civilian defense employees in the Pentagon’s Courtyard.

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Designing exoskeletons: Army researcher’s interest in robotics leads to innovative device

Dan Baechle from the U.S. Army Research Laboratory Multifunctional Materials research team has created a laboratory prototype of a device he designed to sense and damp out arm tremors for Army marksmanship training. His concept demonstrates the simple, control scheme has potential to correct involuntary tremors in shooting. Research Assistant Sean Averill, an incoming sophomore at Drexel University who majors in mechanical engineering, has been working with Baechle on the project for the last seven weeks. (U.S. Army photo by Doug LaFon)

Dan Baechle from the U.S. Army Research Laboratory Multifunctional Materials research team has created a laboratory prototype of a device he designed to sense and damp out arm tremors for Army marksmanship training. His concept demonstrates the simple, control scheme has potential to correct involuntary tremors in shooting. Research Assistant Sean Averill, an incoming sophomore at Drexel University who majors in mechanical engineering, has been working with Baechle on the project for the last seven weeks. (U.S. Army photo by Doug LaFon)

By Joyce P. Brayboy, ARL Public Affairs

Dan Baechle had a childhood fascination with robotics and exoskeletons since he first saw Caterpillar’s Power Loader full-body exoskeleton from Aliens. Robotic exoskeletons have been a science fiction theme and an engineering feat since the 1960s.

Practical design techniques that allow a fictional character to be stronger, more powerful or more functional intrigues engineers toward simplicity in futuristic innovation.

At the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, or ARL, Baechle, a mechanical engineer, is testing MAXFAS, a mechatronic arm exoskeleton, which is designed so that it could be used to train new Soldiers to reach shooting proficiency faster.

The near-future vision for the developmental test system is that it would be a training device to help new recruits with novice marksmanship skills and generally help increase combat arms shooting performance on the battlefield.

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Commentary: Model Based Systems Engineering

MBSE Connects the Engineering Dots

MBSE Connects the Engineering Dots

By Thomas Haduch, Director of Systems Engineering, RDECOM

As our systems become more complex, integrated, interoperable and designed to operate in an increasing systems of systems environment, the use of modeling can enhance our ability to analyze and truly understand system performance behaviors and identify developmental risks.

Model Based Systems Engineering is an innovative approach that allows a systems engineer to organically create a methodology to assess and understand the challenges and risks and develop possible solutions associated with the development and implementation of systems.

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Breakthrough in solar cell research results in patent

Research physicists Domenico de Ceglia, Neset Akozbek, Dr. Michael Scalora and Maria Antonietta Vincenti (left to right), assess the solar cell transmission, reflection, absorption properties using a tunable laser source. (U.S. Army photo by Nikki Montgomery)

Research physicists Domenico de Ceglia, Neset Akozbek, Dr. Michael Scalora and Maria Antonietta Vincenti (left to right), assess the solar cell transmission, reflection, absorption properties using a tunable laser source. (U.S. Army photo by Nikki Montgomery)

By Nikki Montgomery, AMRDEC Public Affairs

U.S. Army researchers have developed a tiny photovoltaic solar cell for the conversion of light energy into electrical energy that it resulted in a patent.

The patent reveals a new kind of photovoltaic solar cell with significantly reduced size and cost compared with current solar cells.

Dr. Michael Scalora, a research physicist at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, described the invention as a “breakthrough,” which he hopes will be the basis for further technological progress.

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Commentary: Army science, technology drive innovation

Maj. Gen. John F. Wharton commands the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

Maj. Gen. John F. Wharton commands the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

By Maj. Gen. John F. Wharton, Commanding General, U.S. Army RDECOM

Scientists and engineers from across government, industry and academia are searching for technology solutions to bring empower American warfighters.

Innovation is the fuel for the Army of the future.

Army leaders have described how future Soldiers will “prevent conflict, shape security environments, and win wars while operating as part of our Joint Force and working with multiple partners” in the recently released Army Operating Concept, or AOC.

The AOC is our foundation, and it’s driving our science and technology strategy.

“The AOC is a beginning point for the innovation we need to ensure that our Soldiers, leaders and teams are prepared to win in a complex world,” Army Chief of Staff Gen. Raymond T. Odierno wrote when he introduced the concept.

Innovation is critical for both the operational and institutional Army, he said.

The AOC points out that innovation is the result of “critical and creative thinking and the conversion of new ideas into valued outcomes.”

As the Army’s principle innovators we have worked hard to balance the goals of this mandate by developing strategic partnerships that trigger innovation and aligning the command to be able to capture the spark of new ideas and convert it into the organizational energy that drives the attainment of valued outcomes.

We continually reach out to our industry partners as we seek to maintain the Army’s decisive overmatch because we recognize the Department of Defense is not the sole source of key breakthrough technologies. Many groundbreaking technological innovations in robotics, advanced computing, miniaturization and 3-D printing come from the commercial sector. Collaboration with these innovators will breed new ideas and ensure our technological edge through the next several decades.

Our goal is to capture the benefit of those partnerships and fuse it with our own innovations. To tackle the Army’s most important objectives, we have aligned ourselves across the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command’s Centers of Excellence. RDECOM’s technical staff now works in the same seven portfolio areas defined by the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics and Technology). All this is done under the Army Operating Concept philosophy to ensure our efforts address the Army’s warfighting challenges.

Accomplishing this means investing in our most innovative capabilities, such as our prototype integration facilities. Innovative research and development leads to advanced prototyping, which enables smart design, which leads to lowering sustainment costs. Increased funding in coming years will enable our engineering teams to turn ideas into prototypes and then innovate capabilities informed by that prototyping. It also opens up the opportunity to re-engineer existing technologies to use them in different ways or different contexts to deliver new capabilities to Soldiers.

We recognize there are no “silver bullet” technological solutions. It’s not about the technology or device but about enabling the Soldier. Our efforts incorporate innovative solutions to fill technology gaps and make our Soldiers safer, stronger and more situationally aware of their environments.

Innovation will ensure the United States maintains its technological edge. It counters challenges to our competitive advantages and focuses our investments while creating options for future leaders. The Army needs innovative methods to develop technologies that will optimize the capabilities of smaller units by increasing battlefield intuition, military judgment and decision making.

Across RDECOM, I applaud the research and development innovations that lead to technological advancements. Whether it is new sensors, better batteries, or stronger materials for armor protection, the goal is the same. We innovate because it’s all about supporting our Soldiers with the best possible technologies to help them accomplish their missions.

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This commentary appears in the July/August 2015 issue of Army Technology Magazine, which focuses on innovation. The magazine is available as an electronic download, or print publication. The magazine is an authorized, unofficial publication published under Army Regulation 360-1, for all members of the Department of Defense and the general public.

 

Thinking clearly about the future of warfare

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Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster is the deputy commanding general, Futures, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, and director of the Army Capabilities Integration Center.

By Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, U.S. Army

Anticipating the demands of future armed conflict requires an understanding of continuities in the nature of war as well as an appreciation for changes in the character for armed conflict. —The U.S. Army Operating Concept

Expert knowledge is a pillar of our military profession, and the ability to think clearly about war is fundamental to developing expert knowledge across a career of service. Junior leaders must understand war to explain to their Soldiers how their unit’s actions contribute to the accomplishment of campaign objectives. Senior officers draw on their understanding of war to provide the best military advice to civilian leaders. Every Army leader uses his or her vision of future conflict as a basis for how he or she trains soldiers and units. Every commander understands, visualizes, describes, directs, leads and assesses operations based, in part, on his or her understanding of continuities in the nature of war and of changes in the character of warfare.

A failure to understand war through a consideration of continuity and change risks what nineteenth century Prussian philosopher Carl von Clausewitz warned against: regarding war as “something autonomous” rather than “an instrument of policy,” misunderstanding “the kind of war on which we are embarking,” and trying to turn war into “something that is alien to its nature.”

In recent years, many of the difficulties encountered in strategic decision making, operational planning, training and force development stemmed from neglect of continuities in the nature of war. The best way to guard against the tendency to try to turn war into something alien to its nature is to understand four key continuities in the nature of war and how the U.S. experience in Afghanistan and Iraq validated their importance.

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Sentient data may one day augment Soldier capability

"Sentient data," or information that can feel and perceive things, might one day protect Soldiers and their networks, said a leading scientist at U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command's Mad Scientist Conference at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., April 30, 2015. (Photo by Air Force Staff Sgt. DeNoris A. Mickle)

“Sentient data,” or information that can feel and perceive things, might one day protect Soldiers and their networks, said a leading scientist at U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command’s Mad Scientist Conference at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., April 30, 2015. (Photo by Air Force Staff Sgt. DeNoris A. Mickle)

By David Vergun, Army News Service

“Sentient data” that can feel and perceive things might one day protect Soldiers and their networks, a leading scientist said.

Thomas F. Greco, director of intelligence, G-2, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, spoke during a media roundtable, April 30, about findings from the TRADOC-sponsored 2015 Mad Scientist Conference at Georgetown University, and attended by top scientists, innovators and thinkers throughout academia, industry and government.

The conference addressed how existing technologies will be used in new ways in 2025 and beyond and what new technologies would become game changers then.

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Future Army nanosatellites to empower Soldiers

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By Jason B. Cutshaw USASMDC/ARSTRAT Public Affairs

One Army project is making the future of satellite communications more responsive to Soldiers’ needs.

The U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command’s Nanosatellite Program, or SNaP, will be a small satellite communications, or SATCOM, constellation. This will allow communication across great distances using existing UHF tactical radios.

“SNaP is a technology demonstration with the goal of showing the military utility nanosatellites can provide to the disadvantaged user,” said Thomas E. Webber, director, SMDC Technical Center Space and Strategic Systems Directorate. “The primary uses are beyond line of sight communications and data exfiltration. SNaP is a natural fit for the command since we are the Army proponent for space and also the SATCOM provider.”

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Army researchers explore the future of computing

The May/June 2015 issue of Army Technology Magazine focuses on future computing.

The May/June 2015 issue of Army Technology Magazine focuses on future computing.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (May 1, 2015) — Supercomputers and new kinds of algorithms are making a big difference as Army scientists explore what’s possible with future computing, according to a senior computer researcher.

“It’s enabling us to do things like design new munitions and design new materials from scratch,” said Dr. John Pellegrino, Computational and Information Sciences director at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory. “We’re just beginning to see how to do modeling of materials so we can have control over every stage of the development and therefore come up with totally new classes of ultra-lightweight and ultra-strong materials for armor or new kinds of electronics for example.”

Pellegrino is the featured interview for the May/June 2015 issue of Army Technology Magazine. The magazine is an authorized, unofficial publication published under Army Regulation 360-1, for all members of the Department of Defense and the general public.

“There is almost limitless potential out there,” Pellegrino said. “We’re doing some really fascinating work from modeling and simulation of materials by design from the atom all the way up to the interaction of humans and information and hardware — whether that be robotics or information systems embodied in chips — that will enable the Soldier to be very highly instrumented and capable and have more information and access at their fingertips than ever before.”

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Revolutionizing Soldier communication

Noninvasive electroencephalography based brain-computer interface enables direct brain-computer communication for training. (U.S. Army photo)

Noninvasive electroencephalography based brain-computer interface enables direct brain-computer communication for training. (U.S. Army photo)

By Jenna Brady, ARL Public Affairs

What if you could communicate through your computer or phone without making a sound or moving a single muscle?

Scientists at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory are investigating this very concept, which has the potential to revolutionize both medical applications and the way in which Soldiers communicate on the battlefield.

The science behind this idea is known as Brain-Computer Interface, known as BCI, which aims to create technologies for recording brain activity and establishing computational methods and algorithms to translate the signals into computer executable commands.

BCI has been most commonly used with individuals who are paralyzed and cannot move or communicate verbally due to paralysis of nearly all voluntary muscles in the body, with the exception of their eyes.

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Envisioning the Future of Computing

Maj. Gen. John F. Wharton commands the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

Maj. Gen. John F. Wharton commands the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

By Maj. Gen. John F. Wharton, Commanding General, U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command

As we invest in a future where technology will lighten the load and better protect Soldiers, we look to scientists and engineers from across the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command and ask, “What decisive capabilities will future computing bring for unified land operations to empower the Army, the joint warfighter and our nation?”

With advanced computers, the U.S. Army continues to see improvements and efficiencies. But where will we be in 10 years?

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Virtually Human: Researchers explore powerful medium for experiential learning

In the Army’s Emergent Leader Immersive Training Environment, or ELITE, soldiers hone their basic counseling skills through practice with virtual humans like virtual Staff Sergeant Jessica Chen.

In the Army’s Emergent Leader Immersive Training Environment, or ELITE, soldiers hone their basic counseling skills through practice with virtual humans like virtual Staff Sergeant Jessica Chen.

By Orli Belman, USC Institute for Creative Technologies

New research aims to get robots and humans to speak the same language to improve communication in fast-moving and unpredictable situations.

Scientists from the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the University of Southern California Institute for Creative Technologies are exploring the potential of developing a flexible multi-modal human-robot dialogue that includes natural language, along with text, images and video processing.

“Research and technology are essential for providing the best capabilities to our warfighters,” said Dr. Laurel Allender, director of the ARL Human Research and Engineering Directorate. “This is especially so for the immersive and live-training environments we are developing to achieve squad overmatch and to optimize Soldier performance, both mentally and physically.”

The collaboration between the Army and ICT addresses the needs of current and future Soldiers by enhancing the effectiveness of the immersive training environment through the use of realistic avatars, virtual humans and intelligent agent technologies, she said.

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Unleash the Power: DOD Supercomputing Resource Center achieves four petaflops

By Joyce P. Brayboy, ARL Public Affairs

When Lila Todd Butler graduated from Temple University in 1941 as the only female mathematician in a class of 1,600, she had no idea she would be one of the computer programmers of ENIAC, the first general-purpose electronic digital computer.

Butler retired from the Ballistics Research Laboratory in 1979 after having written the book of routines that ran the ENIAC and having dedicated her life to developing scientific computer languages.

When she and five other women who had worked at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory’s predecessor laboratory, BRL, returned nearly 20 years later for the ribbon-cutting ceremony for what we know today as the U.S. Army Research Laboratory Defense Supercomputing Resource Center in 1996, it marked a new era of high-performance computing at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

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Computers harness language translation

Afghan Army doctors in a clinic adjacent to Forward Operating Base Lightning and outside the city of Gardez in Paktia Province, Afghanistan, received copies of the critical care manual translated during a partnership between doctors who were in the region and U.S. Army Research Laboratory researchers using computer translation technology. (U.S. Army photo)

Afghan Army doctors in a clinic adjacent to Forward Operating Base Lightning and outside the city of Gardez in Paktia Province, Afghanistan, received copies of the critical care manual translated during a partnership between doctors who were in the region and U.S. Army Research Laboratory researchers using computer translation technology. (U.S. Army photo)

By Joyce P. Brayboy, ARL Public Affairs

While leading a medical training team in Kabul, Afghanistan, a U.S. Navy commander became frustrated as he faced the challenge of interpreting complex medical information.

Commander Kurt Henry was seeing cases of intestinal tuberculosis that he knew were treatable, but the regional hospital’s critical care unit did not have medical manuals to provide treatment instruction for newly assigned doctors.

When he scanned the Internet for documentation about treatment options, he only came across information written in English. His team spoke the native language of the Afghan people, Dari, recalled Steve LaRocca, computer scientist and team chief at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory.

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Cognitive science research: Steering Soldiers in the right direction

Dr. Tad Brunyé (right) and Breanne Hawes, U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center Cognitive Science Team, examine brain hemodynamic and electroencephalography results for a study examining the brain signatures of mental workload during virtual navigation research (U.S. Army photo by David Kamm).

Dr. Tad Brunyé (right) and Breanne Hawes, U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center Cognitive Science Team, examine brain hemodynamic and electroencephalography results for a study examining the brain signatures of mental workload during virtual navigation research (U.S. Army photo by David Kamm).

By Jane Benson, NSRDEC Public Affairs

Soldiers face special challenges during navigation. Their jobs are physically demanding. They are often under extreme stress, and they often need to make quick decisions in an ever-changing and sometimes dangerous environment. They may be cold, hot, hungry or tired. All of these factors can affect the ability to make wise navigation decisions.

Army researchers use virtual reality to test to test Soldiers and discover influences on choices people make when choosing a route.

Dr. Tad Brunyé, a member of the Cognitive Science Team at the Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center, investigates spatial and non-spatial influences on Soldier navigation choices.

“This type of knowledge will help optimize Soldier performance,” Brunyé said. “Soldiers also show reliable biases in memory for landmark locations due to the emotional nature of events that transpired at that location.”

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Limitless potential of Future Computing

Interview with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory’s Dr. John Pellegrino

Dr. John Pellegrino is the director of the Computational and Information Sciences Directorate and chief information officer for the U.S. Army Research Laboratory.
He is responsible for basic and applied research and its transition in the areas of network and information sciences, cyber defense, high-performance computing and battlefield environments. His duties include research program development and coordination, technology transition and support to current forces, as well as responsibility for laboratory network operations. He has technical oversight of the state-of-the art-high performance computing assets, computational capabilities, and wide area networking methodologies for the laboratory, Department of the Army, and DOD; as well as oversight of the DOD Major Shared Resource Center at ARL and the Army High-Performance Computing Research Center.Pellegrino earned a bachelor of arts in physics from Gordon College in 1976, a master of science in physics from University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1980 and completed his doctorate from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1981.
He has authored and co-authored more than two dozen technical papers and reports, and is co-editor of the book “Accousto-Optic Signal Processing.”

Army Technology Magazine recently interviewed Dr. Pellegrino.

Question: What is your vision for the future of computing?

Pellegrino: We’ve barely begun to scratch the surface of what’s possible with computing.

We see the future of computing continuing down two paths. One, to be the big iron computing, or the massive computing architectures and machines. It is massively parallel and incorporates new kinds of algorithms. It’s enabling us to do things like design new munitions and design new materials from scratch.

We’re just beginning to see how to do modeling of materials so we can have control over every stage of the development and therefore come up with totally new classes of ultra-lightweight and ultra-strong materials for armor or new kinds of electronics for example.

As we march forward, we’re going to be tackling big problems in networks. What is a composite network? How does the Internet work? How are we going to be able to protect it, and extract information from it? That’s one whole train of research in computing and application of computing that will be going on.

We have only a vague idea at this time how to protect that information. Cyber-defense is a big issue. The communications, even protecting parts of the communication, how information is connected, how to keep communications robust even in the face of heavy adversarial action … it’s a big deal.

On the other side, it’s the embedded computing that will be in just about everything. We see these things going in a trajectory to be more and more powerful, but to be more embedded and integral with things.

One of the futures of computing that many of us see is that extremely interesting space of the intersection with the human and the computer. The human originality, creativity, the spark, will benefit from the augmentation of more mundane things to really enable that creativity and foster and let it grow without having to worry about the ordinary porting around stuff.

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Virtual is Reality: Natick aims to help subject matter experts see big picture

Mary Giacalone, an NSRDEC program analyst (left) and Rick Haddad, co-lead for the Force Protection, Soldier and Small Unit, Science and Technology Objective Demonstration, work on early deliverables on a virtual demonstrator, which is part of a much larger, Army-wide, Soldier System Engineering Architecture effort. (U.S. Army photo by David Kamm)

Mary Giacalone, an NSRDEC program analyst (left) and Rick Haddad, co-lead for the Force Protection, Soldier and Small Unit, Science and Technology Objective Demonstration, work on early deliverables on a virtual demonstrator, which is part of a much larger, Army-wide, Soldier System Engineering Architecture effort. (U.S. Army photo by David Kamm)

By Jane Benson, NSRDEC Public Affairs

Natick researchers are creating a virtual world to provide an accurate, instant and interactive snapshot of the Soldier and his or her equipment.

With optimal performance in mind, Rick Haddad and the Soldier Capabilities Integration Team from the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center are working to ensure the Soldier and equipment work together in concert.

“We developed a likely task scenario environment that a Soldier or squad would be operating in and took every protection project and found where it most likely would have value to the warfighter within the scenario,” Haddad said. “We created a visual where people could see how their project fits in the operational environment and how it works with other products.”

The team created a virtual demonstration of 77 projects. In the long-term, Haddad said he hopes the virtual demonstration will spark the development of a web-based interactive tool that will extend across Army Science and Technology to make products for the Soldier more compatible and enhance Soldier performance.

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Cyber strategy in tactical environments

“We’re highly reliant on distributed communications systems, which are more prone to interception because you are in close proximity to the enemy within radio line of sight range,”  said Giorgio Bertoli, CERDEC Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate, acting chief scientist.

“We’re highly reliant on distributed communications systems, which are more prone to interception because you are in close proximity to the enemy within radio line of sight range,” said Giorgio Bertoli, CERDEC Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate, acting chief scientist.

By Kristen Kushiyama, CERDEC Public Affairs

The U.S. Army is analyzing cyberspace requirements and outlining potential technical investments based on its Cyber Materiel Development Strategy released in February 2015.

Doctrinal, operational, acquisition and research and development communities for Army materiel development worked together for more than two years on the comprehensive strategy, which looks at where Army cyberspace capabilities currently are and what lies ahead.

“The Army must be prepared to operate and fight within the Cyberspace Domain,” said Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology Heidi Shyu. “It is essential … that we use our limited acquisition and science and technology resources to identify and address critical Army specific problem sets and capability gaps. Where possible, we must leverage the best solutions and ideas available through our partnerships and collaboration within the Department of Defense, other government agencies, industry and academia.”

Shyu appointed Henry Muller, director of the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, or CERDEC, as the Army Cyber Task Force lead.

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Miniaturization: Where good ideas and technology meet

Shane Thompson, an electronics engineer with the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, displays a compact processor board, developed by AMRDEC's Image and Signal Processing Function, which performs both target acquisition and tracking. (U.S. Army photo by Nikki Montgomery)

Shane Thompson, an electronics engineer with the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, displays a compact processor board, developed by AMRDEC’s Image and Signal Processing Function, which performs both target acquisition and tracking. (U.S. Army photo by Nikki Montgomery)

AMRDEC Public Affairs

Miniaturization and advances in computing have had an enormous impact on all aspects of life — especially in the realm of digital image and signal processing.

Only a decade or two ago, appreciable computing power required to perform military-grade image and signal processing tasks necessitated large, clunky computers or racks of dedicated processors.

Now, powerful processing speeds and computational capability are common in tablet computers and even smart phones.

The U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center now has advanced computational power capabilities in a package small enough to bring complex image and signal processing technology to small battlefield weapons.

“We are leveraging advances in computer technology to push the Army’s state-of-the-art in a diverse range of military applications,” said Steven Vanstone, AMRDEC Image and Signal Processing Function acting chief.

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