Army illustrator helps researchers

Autumn Kulaga is a biomedical illustrator at ARL. She uses CT scans to create a variety of 2-D and 3-D medical illustrations and animations, other graphic designs, data visualizations and 3-D models. (U.S. Army photo by Conrad Johnson)

ARL Public Affairs

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, MD (October 27, 2015) — An Army artist is making a difference at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory.

Autumn Kulaga is a biomedical illustrator at ARL. She uses CT scans to create a variety of 2-D and 3-D medical illustrations and animations, other graphic designs, data visualizations and 3-D models. All of these are used to clearly and succinctly communicate and visualize the injuries sustained.

Depicting injuries is not always easy using injury photographs and medical imaging, such as computerized tomography, or CT, scans. Scans do not necessarily highlight the injury of interest and, as a result, include unnecessary information such as unaffected body tissue and non-related injuries. They also sometimes reveal personally identifying features. Also, customers served by the ARL Survivability/Lethality Analysis Directorate, known as ARL-SLAD, are often not experts in anatomy, and benefit from illustrations to understand and analyze the injury depicted. ARL develops custom medical art and illustrations to help analysts visualize, archive and communicate pertinent information about injuries.

“I have always gravitated towards art and science,” Kulaga said. “To me these subjects are symbiotic, and therefore medical illustration seemed like a great path forward for my career. Not only does this let me use my creative talents on a daily basis, but I am constantly learning new material as I become involved in different projects.” Continue reading

Army researchers build partnerships through international assignments

Dr. Gordon Videen, a U.S. Army Research Laboratory physicist, participated in the Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program at the Spanish National Institute of Aerospace Technology. (U.S. Army photo by Doug LaFon)

Dr. Gordon Videen, a U.S. Army Research Laboratory physicist, participated in the Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program at the Spanish National Institute of Aerospace Technology. (U.S. Army photo by Doug LaFon)

By Dan Lafontaine, RDECOM Public Affairs

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Aug. 18, 2015) — U.S. Army scientists and engineers combine forces each year with America’s allies to advance the state of military technology.

The Army bolsters its relationship with foreign partners and promotes international research cooperation through the Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program, officials said.

ESEP is a professional-development program that provides career-broadening work assignments for U.S. government employees in foreign defense establishments and vice versa.

Mid-career level Army engineers and scientists in Career Program 16 can apply through ESEP to work with an American ally for a year, with the possibility of an extension. Applicants may arrange for an assignment to one of 17 countries. Nine ESEP participants from the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command returned to the United States in June 2015 after a year abroad.

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Building the human body, one cell at a time

Reginald Gray, Ph.D, MBA is supporting ECBC's Life Sciences division as a postdoctoral fellow from Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE).

Reginald Gray, Ph.D, MBA is supporting ECBC’s Life Sciences division as a postdoctoral fellow from Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education.

 

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Reginald Gray, Ph.D, M.B.A. was always excited about medicine and science. After spending his undergraduate summers doing biomedical research, he graduated from Xavier University of Louisiana and enrolled in graduate school earning his Ph.D in Pharmacology from Case Western Reserve University. He later attended medical school and began working for the United States Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense. Gray is now an Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education postdoctoral fellow working with the in vitro stem cell group at the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center.

Gray is utilizing his graduate studies in pathology, pharmacology and medical school training in cardiology to support Harry Salem, Ph.D, Chief Scientist for Life Sciences, to develop the Human-on-a-Chip project. The Human-on-a-Chip project is currently focused on using in vitro stem cell technologies in predictive human toxicology of four organ systems: heart, lung, liver, and nervous system. The project will help give better data as to how the human body might react to everything from chemical warfare agents to diseases. Recently, Human-on-a-Chip was awarded $24 million by Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, Pacific, on behalf of Defense Threat Reduction Agency to continue research for Human-on-a-Chip along with Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, the University of Michigan, Morgan State University and The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Secretary of the Army visits Picatinny, assesses sequestration impact on R&D

Secretary of the Army John McHugh looks at a technology display during a visit to Picatinny Arsenal, N.J. McHugh visited the New Jersey military installation, which has been designated the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition, Sept. 26, 2013, to assess the effect of sequestration on the installation's efforts in research, development, acquisition and lifecycle management of weapon systems and ammunition. (U.S. Army photo by Erin Usawicz)

Secretary of the Army John McHugh looks at a technology display during a visit to Picatinny Arsenal, N.J. McHugh visited the New Jersey military installation, which has been designated the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition, Sept. 26, 2013, to assess the effect of sequestration on the installation’s efforts in research, development, acquisition and lifecycle management of weapon systems and ammunition. (U.S. Army photo by Erin Usawicz)

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (Sept. 26, 2013) — Secretary of the Army John McHugh was at the Picatinny Arsenal Thursday, to assess the effect of sequestration on the installation’s efforts in research, development, acquisition and lifecycle management of weapon systems and ammunition.

“This is a unique facility with a critically important mission; there really is no other government or industry counterpart to Picatinny,” McHugh said, underscoring the arsenal’s contribution to national security. “The workforce possesses knowledge and expertise that increases the lethality of the joint services warfighter.”

Picatinny Arsenal was designated the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition, providing products and services to all branches of the U.S. military.

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Former “Cheers” actor visits Picatinny to learn military manufacturing techniques

During a tour of Picatinny Sept. 4, James Zunino (right), Picatinny Materials Engineer, shows actor John Ratzenberger a modular tool that can be added onto the Multi-Axis Modular Manufacturing Platform for additive manufacturing. Different tools allow the machine to perform different manufacturing techniques. Photo Credit: Erin Usawicz

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Actor John Ratzenberger, best known for his iconic role as postal worker Cliff Clavin on the TV show “Cheers,” is promoting manufacturing in the U.S.

His interest led him to visit Picatinny Arsenal Sept. 4, where he saw first-hand a number of the advanced manufacturing techniques the installation uses to equip the nation’s warfighters.

Ratzenberger’s interest in manufacturing previously inspired him to produce and host shows like “Made in America,” a Travel Channel TV production highlighting manufacturing companies that produce interesting products across the nation.

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High school graduate gets personal tour of Picatinny labs

This high school graduate (right) impressed us so much with his research on nanotechnology that he got invited for a personal tour of our nanotechnology labs.

This high school graduate (right) impressed us so much with his research on nanotechnology that he got invited for a personal tour of our nanotechnology labs.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — So there was this high school student who just graduated this year who presented a paper at the Monmouth Junior Science Symposium that was so thorough with his independent research on nanotechnology that we just had to get him a personal invite to come and tour our labs. Seriously exciting.

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Former Picatinny employees inducted into Ammunition Hall of Fame

Photo Credit: Todd MozesFrom left: 2013 Ammunition Hall of Fame inductees William DeMassi, Charles Digney, Dr. Joseph Lannon.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Three former Picatinny employees were inducted into the Ammunition Hall of Fame July 25 in honor of their contributions to U.S. military ammunition.

Dr. Joseph Lannon, Charles Digney and William DeMassi served the Department of Defense supporting the development, purchase, and delivery of ammunition to U.S. servicemembers.

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Picatinny cultivates today’s teacher’s, tomorrow’s innovators

So much learning going on here.

So much learning going on here.


PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Why stop at just getting students more interested in science, technology, engineering and mathematics when we can get local teachers involved and excited as well? Well that’s just what we did and we’re quite pleased with the results.

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Picatinny to grant doctoral degrees

Soon we'll have people who have earned their PhD from Picatinny Arsenal.

Soon we’ll have people who have earned their PhD from Picatinny Arsenal.


PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Sure we’re already the Joint Center of Excellence for Armaments and Munitions. Now we’ll also be known as a degree granting institution. Who will be the first to earn their PhD from Picatinny Arsenal?

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Picatinny and NJIT invite middle school girls to get excited about science and technology

Njit_seal

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Picatinny Arsenal and the New Jersey Institute of Technology coordinated a visit here for middle school girls to get them excited about careers in science and technology. How’d it go? You’ll have to find out yourself.

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External validation helps us realize how good we really are

Yessss.

Yessss.

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — The Armament Software Engineering Center at the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center here was recently recognized as one of the top organizations within the federal government by earning a CMMI-DEV Maturity Level 5 distinction. We are the only U.S. Federal Government organization to currently hold that. To find out more about what a big deal that is, click here to read the whole story.

Cut-resistant safety gloves lower risk of onsite injury

Since the 2010 ECBC Industrial Incident Evaluation, the number of hand injuries within the organization have decreased significantly.

Since the 2010 ECBC Industrial Incident Evaluation, the number of hand injuries within the organization have decreased significantly.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (June 5, 2013) — Phil Rice tests and replaces critical filter systems at chemical laboratories at the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s chemical and biological center.

Edgewood Chemical Biological Center has adopted new protective equipment for onsite filter maintenance: cut-resistant safety gloves, which dramatically decrease the number of hand injuries.

Rice, a chemical engineering technician, dresses in personnel protective equipment, or PPE, to carry out his important mission. The impermeable Tyvek coveralls, nitrile and butyl glove, tap boots, and the M40 masks are common items to protect against highly toxic chemical contamination threats; however, this type of PPE does not protect against physical hazards, such as the sharp metal edges around the filter units.

“The sharp edges of the stainless steel filters would cut right through a brand new pair of standard butyl gloves that we were using,” Rice said. “The Applications Integration Branch was looking for ways to avoid hand-cutting accidents and decided to have a trial run with the Kevlar gloves.”

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Picatinny engineers help West Point cadets patent their inventions

This man wants to help you patent your invention.

This man wants to help you patent your invention.

WEST POINT, N.Y. — Two West Point cadets invent something suspiciously similar to Batman’s grappling hook gun. Picatinny engineers rush to help cadets secure patents ahead of Wayne Enterprises.

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Army announces research, development achievement awards

Dr. Betsy Rice, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, is one of 153 Research and Development Achievement awardees. Rice earned an outstanding technical leadership award for her energetic materials project.

Dr. Betsy Rice, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, is one of 153 Research and Development Achievement awardees. Rice earned an outstanding technical leadership award for her energetic materials project.

WASHINGTON (May 9, 2013) — The U.S. Army announced its 2012 Research and Development Awards April 30. The annual recognition highlights the best in Army science and technology.

The Army employs nearly 13,000 civilian scientists, researchers and engineers.

“Just over one percent receives the RDA award,” Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology Mary J. Miller wrote in a memorandum. “These recipients reflect the great diversity of talent and expertise within the Army laboratory system that support the future capabilities of our Soldiers.”

Of the 153 Army scientists and engineers earning this honor, 140 are part of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command. The remaining awardees are assigned to the Engineering Research and Development Center (Corps of Engineers), the Army Research Institute for Behavioral and Social Sciences and the Medical Research and Materiel Command.

“We’re moving the state of the art every day,” RDECOM Director Dale A. Ormond said. “We like to say that our people operate in the space between the state of the art and the art of the possible, where innovation is paramount and focused on addressing needs unique to the Army.”

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Assistant secretary: Work smarter to fill capability gaps

Assistant Secretary for the Army (Acquisition, Logistics & Technology) and Army Acquisition Executive Heidi Shyu arrives at the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center at Detroit Arsenal, Mich. April 9.

Assistant Secretary for the Army (Acquisition, Logistics & Technology) and Army Acquisition Executive Heidi Shyu arrives at the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center at Detroit Arsenal, Mich. April 9.

DETROIT ARSENAL, Mich. — (April 9, 2013) A senior Army leader visited the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s tank and automotive center to meet with workers and outline her vision for the future.

Assistant Secretary for the Army (Acquisition, Logistics & Technology) and Army Acquisition Executive Heidi Shyu spoke with the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center workforce in an April 9 town hall meeting.

The Secretary of the Army’s toughest challenge will be balancing priorities while filling capability gaps in an uncertain fiscal environment, she said.

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Research center co-workers reunite while deployed

Capt. David Hartfield and Domonique Davis of the AMRDEC Security and Intelligence Division saw each other while on deployments to Kuwait.

Capt. David Hartfield and Domonique Davis of the AMRDEC Security and Intelligence Division saw each other while on deployments to Kuwait.

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. — On any given workday, Domonique Davis and David Hartfield can be found in their respective offices in the Security and Intelligence Division of the Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center.

But in February 2012, the Redstone co-workers — Davis, a security specialist, and Hartfield, an intelligence specialist — found each other in an unexpected place: the Middle East.

The two AMRDEC employees took very different paths to this unplanned meeting in the desert. Hartfield was on a military deployment to Iraq from August to December of 2011 because in addition to his civilian career as an intelligence specialist, Hartfield is a captain in the Reserves.

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Engineering director encourages cost-consciousness

James Lackey is the new director of the Engineering Directorate at the Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center. to Credit: Ryan Keith

James Lackey is the new director of the Engineering Directorate at the Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center. to Credit: Ryan Keith

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. — Former Naval Air Systems Command test project engineer James Lackey has joined the Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center as director of the Engineering Directorate.

A native of Maryland, Lackey had a near 25-year career at the Naval Air Systems Command at Patuxent River, Md. He was a strike aircraft flight test project engineer for more than a decade, and between 1999 and 2008 held a variety of program management assignments.

Lackey said he is looking forward to applying his background from the Navy to the Army and multiple-service customers supported by AMRDEC.

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Army aviation engineer has exciting career

Anna Locke, electrical engineer and project manager at AMRDEC's Prototype Integration Facility, describes modifications to the Common Missile Warning System during a 2009 tour of the facility.

Anna Locke, electrical engineer and project manager at AMRDEC’s Prototype Integration Facility, describes modifications to the Common Missile Warning System during a 2009 tour of the facility.

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. — From an early age, Anna Locke wanted to be an engineer.

“Since I was just a child, I remember hearing stories of my father’s efforts to help our Soldiers as an engineer for [the Department of Defense]. I thought he had the most interesting job in the world,” Locke said. “I knew from a young age that I wanted to pursue an exciting career that results in helping those that risk their lives to protect this country.”

Today, Locke is fulfilling that dream as an electrical engineer at the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s aviation and missile center.

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