DOD collaboration researches munition safety

U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center Chief Scientist for Energetics, Dr. Jamie Neidert presents an overview for the Munitions Area Technology Group II concerning minimum signature rocket propulsion goals. (U.S. Army photo)

By Nikki Montgomery, AMRDEC Public Affairs

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (Oct. 23, 2015) — Government, industry, and academic partners are working together to improve the way munitions function to protect the safety of our future warfighters.

The U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center, or AMRDEC, hosted a Department of Defense collaboration to discuss Insensitive Munitions at the Dynetics Solutions Complex Oct. 20–23.

The Joint Insensitive Munitions Technology Program convenes biannually to exchange research information focused on improving the lethality, reliability, safety, and survivability of munitions and weapon systems, as well as ensuring IM compliance. IMs describe those munitions that will not react to unintentional triggers causing catastrophic damage that impairs warfighting capability.

The Office of the Secretary of Defense directs the approximate $32 million dollar program while it is managed by the U.S. Army Armaments Research, Development and Engineering Center, another U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command organization.

JIMTP Program Manager, Anthony Di Stasio expressed the anticipated improvements gained from the Fall Review.

AMRDEC Military Deputy Director, Maj. (Promotable) John Schmitt provides opening statements at the four day, JIMTP Fall Review. (U.S. Army photo)

“We believe the JIMTP is one of the best opportunities for the DOD technical community to not only exchange information and advance technology but also make the Warfighter safer, which is the end goal of everything that we do,” Di Stasio said. “We’re very proud to say that the amount of lives we save with JIMTP technology grows with every engagement.”

Under the JIMTP, investments are focused on five Munition Area Technology Groups including high performance rocket propulsion, minimum signature rocket propulsion, blast and fragmentation warheads, anti-armor warheads, and gun propulsion.

The program is structured around these five areas with clear cross-cutting tasks. Because the program invests in and demonstrates technologies from a joint service perspective, it can ensure the development of technology with the broadest applicability while avoiding duplication of efforts. The partnership capitalizes maximum return on investment in a time of increasing fiscal constraint.

The review featured subject matter experts nationwide from government organizations and industry partners involved in the JIMTP effort. AMRDEC Chief Scientist for Energetics, Dr. Jamie Neidert presented the overview for the Munitions Area Technology Group II concerning minimum signature rocket propulsion goals.

“This technical program brings together the brightest and most experienced energetics, technologists, propulsion, warheads and design engineers under one technical umbrella for true collaboration,” said Neidert. “It is an honor to be associated with such innovative and capable colleagues.”

Many substantial improvements in munitions safety have been achieved through the combined efforts of the JIMTP and the missile research community. Integrating these developmental technologies requires significant design, analysis, and test and evaluation. The DOD is committed to developing new munitions to meet increased performance requirements and protecting the Warfighter from threatening environments.


Editor’s note: The U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center is part of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, which has the mission to ensure decisive overmatch for unified land operations to empower the Army, the joint warfighter and our nation. RDECOM is a major subordinate command of the U.S. Army Materiel Command.


Originally published at www.army.mil on October 23, 2015.