Two-for-one device houses right radio at right time

Matthew Johnson, Communications- Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center  engineering technician, uses computer-aided manufacturing machining software program to simulate the universal radio mount build before the actual build. (U.S. Army photo by Kathryn Bailey)

Matthew Johnson, Communications- Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center engineering technician, uses computer-aided manufacturing machining software program to simulate the universal radio mount build before the actual build. (U.S. Army photo by Kathryn Bailey)

By Kathryn Bailey, CERDEC CPI Directorate

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Aug. 12, 2015) — A little innovation can go a long way towards helping U.S. military forces successfully facilitate their missions. Even an apparatus no bigger than a breadbox recently solved a challenge involving two radios and the need to make their transport lighter. 

The U.S. Special Operations Command, or SOCOM, required a solution that would allow its forces to mount AN/PRC 117G and Rover 6 radios to a vehicle, yet still conform to strict size and weight limitations. Both radios performed key functions, yet both were not always needed on each mission. 

“Instead of designing two separate radio mounts, our engineers created a universal two-radio mount design that swivels to expose two separate mounting brackets,” said James Shannon, the project’s lead for the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, or CERDEC. 

The center’s Command, Power and Integration, or CP&I, Directorate led the effort for CERDEC and leveraged its Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance, or C4ISR Prototype Integration Facility, or PIF, to complete the requirements. 

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