Army, DOE studies may lead to unique armor technology

Argonne National Laboratory researchers use a six-circle goniometer to hold and rotate a sample being exposed to the Advanced Photon Source X-ray beam. (Department of Energy photo)

Argonne National Laboratory researchers use a six-circle goniometer to hold and rotate a sample being exposed to the Advanced Photon Source X-ray beam. (Department of Energy photo)

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Oct. 20, 2014) — Army Research Laboratory scientists say they may be better able to develop novel armor technologies to improve protection levels for U.S. warfighters based on information from a recent Department of Energy study.

For the first time, American researchers observed and measured the dynamic deflection and failure of material fibers as they deformed under high impact and at high speeds during recent experiments at the Argonne National Laboratory, a national laboratory within the DOE.

“If we know at very high fidelity scales how and why an armor or armor material is failing, we may be able to come up with a new material or material response mechanism to circumvent the failure mode and, in turn, significantly increase the armor performance by eliminating this ‘weakest link’ failure mode,” ARL physicist Dr. Michael Zellner said.

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