Exchange program with Australia focuses on U.S. Army’s chemical protection

Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program participant Steve Carrig and co-worker Julia Freeman operate Chemical Articulated Test Manikin, known as CARTMAN, in the Australian Defense Science and Technology Office's Environmental Test Facility in Melbourne, Australia.

Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program participant Steve Carrig and co-worker Julia Freeman operate Chemical Articulated Test Manikin, known as CARTMAN, in the Australian Defense Science and Technology Office’s Environmental Test Facility in Melbourne, Australia.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Sept. 20, 2013) — Spending two years immersed in the Australian defense science and technology community provided new perspectives for a U.S. Army engineer.

Steve Carrig said his work with the Australian military allowed tremendous access to end users — Soldiers — because of the country’s smaller size.

“Having the chance to work with Soldiers on a more routine basis gives you a sense of who you’re working for,” said Carrig, who participated in the Army’s Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program from July 2011 to June 2013 at the Defense Science and Technology Office. “Having spent two years in a more closely knit environment really drove it home.

“That’s something that I won’t forget. Even if I’m sitting here in an office every day, managing things from afar, it reminds me that’s what I’m doing.”

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