Picatinny to remove tons of toxins from lethal rounds

Belts of .50 caliber ammunition await U.S. Soldiers with the 6th Engineer Battalion, 2nd Engineer Brigade, as they prepare to conduct qualifications on the M2 .50 caliber machine gun at a range in Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Aug. 14, 2012. The Pyrotechnics Division of the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center, at Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., is developing an alternate formula for certain armor-piercing incendiary projectiles that is friendlier to the environment than the chemicals currently being used.

Belts of .50 caliber ammunition await U.S. Soldiers with the 6th Engineer Battalion, 2nd Engineer Brigade, as they prepare to conduct qualifications on the M2 .50 caliber machine gun at a range in Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Aug. 14, 2012. Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. (August 22, 2013) — An enemy convoy transporting a supply of fuel rumbles across the desert floor, an ideal target for armor-piercing incendiary projectiles.

These projectiles are most useful for “after-armor effects,” such as an incandescent flash immediately after penetrating a hard target. The resulting plume may be useful for devastating any fuel-storage facilities by igniting the fuel vapors.

The Army uses a formulation called IM-28 that is charged into certain armor-piercing incendiary projectiles, which can be fired from such weapons as the M2, M3, and M85 machine guns.

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