Cut-resistant safety gloves lower risk of onsite injury

Since the 2010 ECBC Industrial Incident Evaluation, the number of hand injuries within the organization have decreased significantly.

Since the 2010 ECBC Industrial Incident Evaluation, the number of hand injuries within the organization have decreased significantly.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (June 5, 2013) — Phil Rice tests and replaces critical filter systems at chemical laboratories at the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s chemical and biological center.

Edgewood Chemical Biological Center has adopted new protective equipment for onsite filter maintenance: cut-resistant safety gloves, which dramatically decrease the number of hand injuries.

Rice, a chemical engineering technician, dresses in personnel protective equipment, or PPE, to carry out his important mission. The impermeable Tyvek coveralls, nitrile and butyl glove, tap boots, and the M40 masks are common items to protect against highly toxic chemical contamination threats; however, this type of PPE does not protect against physical hazards, such as the sharp metal edges around the filter units.

“The sharp edges of the stainless steel filters would cut right through a brand new pair of standard butyl gloves that we were using,” Rice said. “The Applications Integration Branch was looking for ways to avoid hand-cutting accidents and decided to have a trial run with the Kevlar gloves.”

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